zephcat
08/23 #1

I teach online, and can do so from anywhere in the world. Considering moving to Spain for a year, and a little confused about the visa options (I'd love to stay longer than the Schengen visa allows Americans). I've heard of the non-lucrative visa, and wondering if this would be the one I'd try to obtain?

I can show about $60,000 of savings, and a paycheck of $2000 each month. Will this suffice? And is it even possible that I can obtain a long-term visa?

Thanks so much! And feel free to redirect me...I know there have been similar threads.

Also...Is the process similar to that of Italy, or is it a bit easier in Italy to obtain a long-term visa? Or do I have no idea what I'm talking about? :juggle:

kdsb
08/23 #2

I teach online, and can do so from anywhere in the world. Considering moving to Spain for a year, and a little confused about the visa options (I'd love to stay longer than the Schengen visa allows Americans). I've heard of the non-lucrative visa, and wondering if this would be the one I'd try to obtain?

I can show about $60,000 of savings, and a paycheck of $2000 each month. Will this suffice? And is it even possible that I can obtain a long-term visa?

Thanks so much! And feel free to redirect me...I know there have been similar threads.

Also...Is the process similar to that of Italy, or is it a bit easier in Italy to obtain a long-term visa? Or do I have no idea what I'm talking about? :juggle:

We recently got non lucrative visas to live in Spain and it seems like that would be the right fit for you. The consulate we went through (Boston) was far more interested in regular income rather than savings, and my husband is working remotely. I am also teaching grad school classes online but that income is more sporadic so we didn't even mention it. I think 2K per month meets the requirements. We are a family of 6 so the monthly amount was higher.

Feel free to ask any questions about the process, although ideally try to connect with someone who went through the same consulate recently since it can be different everywhere.

lorort
08/24 #3

I plan on retiring to Spain in a couple of years. This is the info I received from the Consulate in Houston when I asked if I would be able to work on a non-lucrative visa.

You are not allowed to work in Spain at all if you are under a non-lucrative visa. If you wish to work in Spain, you will have to apply for a work visa.

lorort
08/24 #4

Forgot to post about the amount of money needed. This is yearly, so about 2,130 euros monthly.

You will have to provide proof that you have €25,560 available on the day of your application. You can provide proof of that with checking accounts, savings accounts, investments, annuities…

kdsb
08/24 #5

It seems different consulates handle this differently, since the Boston one is aware that my husband is working remotely and had no issue with this (in fact, they requested a letter verifying it). Best to check with your consulate directly. It looks like Colorado would go to the LA consulate and I have been following the blog of someone who applied through there with a similar situation to ours and their experience was like ours, and they provided documentation about working remotely. Here a link to the post I found helpful about the non lucrative visa process: Ready, Set, Spain! : Non-Lucrative Spanish Visa Requirements

xabiachica
08/24 #6

I plan on retiring to Spain in a couple of years. This is the info I received from the Consulate in Houston when I asked if I would be able to work on a non-lucrative visa.

You are not allowed to work in Spain at all if you are under a non-lucrative visa. If you wish to work in Spain, you will have to apply for a work visa.

yes, that's how it has always been

However, some consulates do seem to be issuing non-lucrative visas to those working remotely. I personally (as in face to face) know someone who is here with a non-lucrative visa who showed his salary from a US company as proof of income, & that was accepted.

There are also a few members of the forum in the same position