Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

9:16 PM - Mar 20, 2007 #11

Douglas also seems to be a bit of a 'yellow book' researcher. He contradicts himself in that book, when throwing guilt on the Lindberg maid he takes inconsistencies in testimony by the maid seriously, but when he's paid by the Ramsey family to establish their innocence, Patsy's confused stories are 'ok'. And, someone correct me if I'm wrong please, he also said the beltway sniper would be a southern white male with little education. (not a fan of his)
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

2:28 PM - Mar 21, 2007 #12

And, someone correct me if I'm wrong please, he also said the beltway sniper would be a southern white male with little education.
It's a bit disingenuous to cherry-pick the times he's been wrong while ignoring the many many more times he's been right. But by all means, go ahead and do it anyway.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

5:11 PM - Mar 21, 2007 #13

marchingAnt is just putting things in perspective. Criminal profiling is more art and intuition than science; if it was as cut-and-dried as chemistry, for instance, then they'd be right 99.9% of the time, yet, they are not. They love to focus on the ones they got right and ignore the ones they got wrong, kinda like psychics who claim to predict the future but ignore all their incorrect prophecies. Jeanne Dixon is a classic example: she claimed she correctly prophesied the JFK murder long before it happened, and her supporters harp on that all the time, yet they choose to ignore the 99% that were dead wrong (makes one wonder if she really was psychic or if she just guessed and got lucky once in a while).It's a bit disingenuous to cherry-pick the times he's been right while ignoring the many many more times he's been wrong (that we never hear about, btw). But by all means, go ahead and do it anyway.
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davidmm
DOJ
Joined: 2:08 AM - Feb 25, 2007

5:46 PM - Mar 21, 2007 #14

I read the book several years ago, and the chapter that fascinated me the most was "Lizzy Borden."I had no idea that the case was so complex and lurid. No wonder it's the stuff of legend.The book's worth reading for that case alone.
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

9:23 PM - Mar 21, 2007 #15

Just like Art Bell and his fave remote viewer, Major Ed Dames. Dames predicted Chandra Levy would be found in the Potomac, and she was found on dry land several miles away. He predicted that Elizabeth Smart was dead, and a few months later she was found alive and well. Finally, he predicted about a month before the Iraq war started that, shortly after it started, North Korea would "invade" South Korea, pull back (obviously just a ruse), and get our troops to follow them over the DMZ, at which point a nuke they buried under the DMZ (which he claims to have remote viewed some time before but didn't know why it was there) would be detonated and kill hundreds, perhaps thousands, of US troops. Needless to say, it never happened either.The conclusion? Ed Dames cannot remote view. Three strikes, and he's out. I'm not saying that remote viewing is not possible, just that Dames can't do it.In like manner, John Douglas' misses should be taken into account to see just how good a profiler he really is, and I bet no one's done that yet. I'd be willing to bet he has more misses than hits, and, if so, that is quite telling.
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Slug
DOJ
Joined: 1:10 AM - Feb 25, 2007

12:36 AM - Mar 22, 2007 #16

I can't get too down on John Douglas because he really nailed Kaczynski back in 1996 when everybody else was droning on and on about Kaczynski's anti-technology rubbish. He hit it right on the head when he observed "Anyone this clearly intelligent who makes such ridiculous demands and has such ridiculous goals isn’t interested in reforming society. He’s got a personal ax to grind based on his own deep problems and inadequacies."
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

5:08 PM - Mar 27, 2007 #17

I am in general a fan of John Douglas and his writings. Some of his ideas on profiling need revising becasue he was one of the inventors of the skill. Just like a Mustang does not look like a Model T because the concept evolved. Profiling is also evolving. I think Douglas has had many more successes than failures.Regarding the book "Cases That Haunt Us" I must say I was very disappointed in the chapter about Zodiac. It is by far the worst chapter in the book. I agree with Tom it is mostly a retelling of the yellowbook. For anyone who likes books on profioling and historical crime I would recommend the book, just skip the chapter on Zodiac!
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juno
Old Newbie
juno
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Joined: 7:17 PM - Feb 28, 2007

7:49 PM - Mar 27, 2007 #18

I'm looking forward to his new BTK book. I found the others rather a let down. Inside the Mind of BTK: The True Story Behind the Thirty-Year Hunt for the Notorious Wichita Serial Killer (Hardcover) by John Douglas (Author), Johnny Dodd (Author) Hardcover: 352 pages Publisher: Jossey-Bass (September 28, 2007)
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Joined: 2:30 PM - Feb 23, 2007

9:42 PM - Apr 01, 2007 #19

Having never once come upon a copy of The Cases That Haunt Us in any bookstore where I live, I'm extremely curious to know exactly what John Douglas may have deduced about Zodiac. Would it be too much to ask if someone posted his findings here, at least in brief...?
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Joined: 12:00 AM - Jan 01, 1970

4:00 AM - Apr 18, 2007 #20

"Profiling" is about as exact as "remote viewing."Surprises abound.
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