"My Name is..." Pitman Shorthand symbol

Janus
Newbie
Janus
Newbie
Joined: August 8th, 2009, 3:42 pm

September 13th, 2016, 6:11 am #1

I am still convinced the Zodiac knew/used Pitman shorthand. I'll write a topic later concerning the telltale signs in his writing, but for now I'd like to put forth a theory about the 'open-ended' figure 8's in the "My name is" cipher.




In Pitman Shorthand, 'dots' stand for vowels (as you can see in the above linked topic). So when you're writing in shorthand and you want to use punctuation (like a full stop) you can't use a dot, because it can be mistaken for a vowel.

Instead you would mark punctuation like this:






Also, if you're writing away and you make a mistake, you never erase it (as shorthand is made for speed writing), nor do you put a cross through it (as it can be mistaken for a word/phrase instead of an error).

So when you make a mistake in Pitman shorthand, you circle it and continue on. When you then transcribe back what you wrote, you just ignore anything in a circle.



I used an image-editing program to make these examples, but I'd reckon if you wrote them freehand (in pen) they wouldn't come out as neatly as mine.

I'm not saying the interpretation of those symbols in the "My name is" cipher means an error, or a period, but I'm just saying that I recognized them immediately when I saw them as Pitman Shorthand. If it's true Zodiac knew/used Pitman, then this would be a very familiar symbol/combination to write.



Online source as proof: http://www.long-live-pitmans-shorthand. ... uation.htm
Quote
Like
Share

gluckman
Old Newbie
gluckman
Old Newbie
Joined: January 17th, 2013, 5:58 am

November 17th, 2016, 8:25 pm #2

Janus, your idea interests me. Putting a series of "errors" in the code would signal that the standard substitution rules don't apply.

For awhile I have been intrigued by the following word:

b e n z o d i a z e p a m

It definitely doesn't work as a standard substitution, but it seems to me it might make sense, say, if this word were some kind of key that provided a hint as to the rules being used in the bigger unsolved ciphers.

Benzodiazepam is a well known drug. Its real name is benzodiazepine, and it was already common in Z's time. There is a related name called diazepam, which sometimes gets confounded with benzodiazepine into benzodiazepam. It is also known as Valium.

One thing I like about this word, is that it almost contains the word zodiac--to the point that it seems to me it might have even been called zodiac in some circles. Yes, this is just wild speculation--I have zero evidence to back this idea up, except that it seems to me the kind of connection other pattern-generating machines (i.e.: people--especially those who like wordplay) would likely make. If, by chance, this were the source of the name Zodiac, the phrase "This is the Zodiac speaking" would be the equivalent of "This is the Valium speaking", much the way we say things like "that was just the booze talking".

Another thing I like is that there is some interesting matching up of letters and characters:
-The 2nd and 3rd letters are an exact match
-The 12th and 13th letters are also an exact match. But, that's not all.
-The zodiac killer's signature symbol starts at position 4, which just happens to be the start of the substring "zodia".

Pareidolia, I suppose, but it jumps out at me every time I look at it.

If the 3 eight-ball symbols are actually Pitman shorthand errors as you suggest, that would give them wildcard status. This would mean the substitution rules are not standard.

Even so, this leaves the problem that there are 2 letters that get decoded in two ways. That is A and M occur twice in the encrypted string. If benzodiazepam is supposed to be the decrypted string, then how would I explain that A decodes to both b and a while M decodes to both a and m. I have no expertise in solving codes, but I can offer an explanation that *might* make sense if we allow that the purpose of the "My name is..." string is to provide a key that gives a clue to how the decrypt the larger ciphers.

You might observe that it is the last 2 letters, in positions 12 and 13 that are being 'repurposed'. I am led to wonder if it could signal that the first 11 letters follow one substitution pattern, then at position 12, a new substitution pattern begins. Thus, we see these letters being reused as the start of a new substitution pattern. Again, this would only make sense if this cipher were intended to be used as a key to understanding the larger unsolved ciphers. In other words, there might be some sort of modulation of the cipher after position 11.

Okay. I realize that I am wildly speculating, so I will stop. I just wanted to throw this word out there to see if anybody else finds it as intriguing as I do, despite its apparent faults.

Thanks
Quote
Like
Share

Mary O
Old Newbie
Mary O
Old Newbie
Joined: February 2nd, 2014, 1:22 am

November 22nd, 2016, 3:53 pm #3

b e n z o d i a z e p a m
lol... that sounds like the name of a medication or something!!!
Quote
Like
Share

drew
DOJ
Joined: March 9th, 2007, 9:09 pm

November 25th, 2016, 12:59 am #4

Very interesting, Janus. I looked up a website on Pitman shorthand, and it says that it "[font='TIMES NEW ROMAN', 'ADOBE-TIMES', TIMES]was learned by a wide audience of writers, office secretaries and newspaper, court and governmental reporters." [/font]
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: February 23rd, 2007, 11:25 pm

August 27th, 2017, 2:39 am #5

Janus I agree with drew, that is very interesting indeed. I was able to get "R. Hernandez" out of the cypher. That is not by making the symbols into what I needed , as some have done.

what I did do was to reverse the / for the letter K, I reversed it to \ ,(as we know zodiac has done ), which makes it a R instead of a K. The rest fell right into place.

I used the solved 3 part cypher as my Rosetta Stone.
Quote
Like
Share

gluckman
Old Newbie
gluckman
Old Newbie
Joined: January 17th, 2013, 5:58 am

November 12th, 2017, 3:32 am #6

Referring back to my comment from 17 Nov 2016, another thing I like about the word benzodiazepam is its connection to the related chemical structures called diazepines, which combine with the benzene structure to form benzodiazepines.

To me, the word suggests 'through the pines". (Note that dia- is a prefix of greek origin meaning 'through'.). If we assume Z was into wordplay, the curious phrase "peek through the pines" could thereby be a suggestion to take a peek through the various diazepines. What happens if we do just that?

Well, according to Wikipedia, there are (at least) 3 types of diazepines:

Here is an excerpt from the Wikipedia page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diazepine):

"...Diazepine is a seven-membered heterocyclic compound with two nitrogen atoms (e.g., in ring positions 1 and 2).
Types include:
  • 1,2-diazepine
  • 1,3-diazepine
  • 1,4-diazepine
When combined with a benzene ring, it is the basis of the benzodiazepine family of compounds. In these compounds the nitrogen atoms are at the 1 and 5 positions as, for example, in clobazam (depending on the position of the fused benzene ring, the nitrogen atoms are also given numbers 1 and 4).[citation needed]..."
If we then check out  the link (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1,4-Diazepine) to 1,4-diazepine, we find the following excerpt:
"...1,4-Diazepine is a diazepine. It is a core element in the structure of benzodiazepines and thienodiazepines..."
Not sure how you enunciate the number that specifies its type. One-comma-four? If you ignored the comma, you might be tempted to call it 14. Or maybe "4-teen", like on the Halloween Card. :D

G
Last edited by gluckman on November 12th, 2017, 7:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

gluckman
Old Newbie
gluckman
Old Newbie
Joined: January 17th, 2013, 5:58 am

November 12th, 2017, 6:54 am #7

At this point, my tongue-in-cheek allusion to 4-teen reference from Halloween Card led me to a crazy new connection. (Please forgive me, I'm letting my imagination completely off its leash here.)

Suppose for a second that my earlier conjecture is right and 'benzodiazepam' is the key to the 13-digit 'my name is' cipher. In that case, he would clearly be making a reference to benzodiazepine in general and diazepam (aka Valium) in particular. That go me wondering what a skeletal formula diagram for diazepam would look like.

Here is a link to the skeletal formula diagram for diazepam, from Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diazepam# ... ucture.svg

Not sure if this is going anywhere, but I am now curious what we might get if we superimpose it over the Mt Diablo map puzzle. There is an 'O' in the diazepam skeletal formula diagram and the Mt Diablo map puzzle says the 'O' is to be set to Mag N. Maybe that indicates how we could try to orient the skeletal structure over Mt Diablo. We would still need to figure out how to manage the distance scale. 

I am not currently set up with the tools to overlay these images and play with them, so I am trying to do this in my head. Problem is, my visualization is not good enough to see if superimposing these images in this way would, say, point suggestively to a number of locations of interest to the Zodiac case. Sigh! 

Time to go to bed.

G

PS. Here is a link to a page on how to understand skeletal formula diagrams: http://www.ivyroses.com/Chemistry/Organ ... ecules.php
Quote
Like
Share

gluckman
Old Newbie
gluckman
Old Newbie
Joined: January 17th, 2013, 5:58 am

November 12th, 2017, 7:11 am #8

Here is the skeletal diagram for diazepam (a benzodiazepine) as an inline image: Diazepam_structure.svg.png
Quote
Like
Share

ZodiacLK
Newbie
ZodiacLK
Newbie
Joined: November 26th, 2017, 4:27 pm

November 26th, 2017, 4:30 pm #9

My Name Is....Zodiac Cipher.jpg
Quote
Like
Share

louy57
Newbie
louy57
Newbie
Joined: September 9th, 2015, 1:10 am

December 31st, 2017, 1:47 am #10

Airplanepilot
Quote
Like
Share