Yep, squirrels are TOUGH

Yep, squirrels are TOUGH

Joined: August 28th, 2011, 4:15 am

December 4th, 2011, 10:32 pm #1

The other day, I put down some bird feed across the yard to try to lure in all the darned European Sparrows that are a blight to the neighborhood.

The first fellow that found it though, was a neighborhood nutter.

I had the .177 Marauder stoked with a Crosman Premier Heavy and standing against the door frame, at the ready. I was surfing The Yellow, and some motion outside the window caught my eye; it was a nutter eating up that bird seed and corn.

I walked out to the balcony door, got the Marauder up, flicked off the safety, and slowly opened the balcony door with a squeak. The nutter was watching me, from about 25 yards away. He was almost prone on the ground, eating that feed.

I braced the Marauder on the door frame and lined up the shot. He was moving his head around, so I lined up the crosshairs on his upper torso, seeking the lung/heart shot. I squeezed the trigger. "TOONG....WOP" The CPH found its home. The squirrel jumped and flipped end-over-end, one and a half times, landing right on his back.

...then, he dashed across the yard. "What the hell?" says I. Now this is not 50 ft-lb. 25 cal. Condor. It is a .177 Marauder, at the factory tune, shooting a CPH at about 16 ft-lbs. and 880 fps. But that should have been plenty to drill this little guy straight through. I expected him to take maybe a couple hops, then die.

I went out and looked for him. Nowhere to be found.

I guess it's possible I grazed him, but that was a solid 'WOP' when the pellet hit him.

Now please, don't tell me: "Shoulda bought a .22" Because if this 10.5 gr. .177 didn't have the power to penetrate him at ~880 fps, (18 FPE) then I don't think a .22 would have either, with its slower MV and wider pellet.

I guess I have to admit that it was not a prime shot. (sigh)

Anyone else have a story about a seemingly pellet-proof squirrel?
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Joined: April 25th, 2008, 12:25 am

December 5th, 2011, 3:07 am #2

yup

you should have used a .22

(just yankin your chain !)

FYI - my local So Cal Squirrels wear Kevlar covered in squirrel fur - so I feel you pain ...
the squirrel you shot ... not so much .. LOL


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Joined: June 25th, 2010, 6:49 pm

December 5th, 2011, 6:28 pm #3

The other day, I put down some bird feed across the yard to try to lure in all the darned European Sparrows that are a blight to the neighborhood.

The first fellow that found it though, was a neighborhood nutter.

I had the .177 Marauder stoked with a Crosman Premier Heavy and standing against the door frame, at the ready. I was surfing The Yellow, and some motion outside the window caught my eye; it was a nutter eating up that bird seed and corn.

I walked out to the balcony door, got the Marauder up, flicked off the safety, and slowly opened the balcony door with a squeak. The nutter was watching me, from about 25 yards away. He was almost prone on the ground, eating that feed.

I braced the Marauder on the door frame and lined up the shot. He was moving his head around, so I lined up the crosshairs on his upper torso, seeking the lung/heart shot. I squeezed the trigger. "TOONG....WOP" The CPH found its home. The squirrel jumped and flipped end-over-end, one and a half times, landing right on his back.

...then, he dashed across the yard. "What the hell?" says I. Now this is not 50 ft-lb. 25 cal. Condor. It is a .177 Marauder, at the factory tune, shooting a CPH at about 16 ft-lbs. and 880 fps. But that should have been plenty to drill this little guy straight through. I expected him to take maybe a couple hops, then die.

I went out and looked for him. Nowhere to be found.

I guess it's possible I grazed him, but that was a solid 'WOP' when the pellet hit him.

Now please, don't tell me: "Shoulda bought a .22" Because if this 10.5 gr. .177 didn't have the power to penetrate him at ~880 fps, (18 FPE) then I don't think a .22 would have either, with its slower MV and wider pellet.

I guess I have to admit that it was not a prime shot. (sigh)

Anyone else have a story about a seemingly pellet-proof squirrel?
more than once. Fortunately, I was able to do follow up shots to finish them. I agree with the ".177 for feathers, .22 for fur" comment. It's not just about penetration, it's about delivering energy for shock. When you're talking body shots on a squirrel, which are tough animals, a larger heavier pellet helps with a margin for error on less than precise shots and delivers more energy into the body causing more damage. I think the problem with my 350 was that the pellet was moving so fast, it would just punch a small hole and exit without dumping it's energy into the intended target. Priority one is shot placement, no doubt. Way too many guys on this forum are very successful with a .177, but I prefer a .22 for fur. Having hunted with both, I have my own personal preferences. You asked if it had happened to anyone else, and it has.

Mark
OneShirt
One Shirt Forge
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Joined: October 5th, 2004, 8:09 am

December 6th, 2011, 6:45 pm #4

The other day, I put down some bird feed across the yard to try to lure in all the darned European Sparrows that are a blight to the neighborhood.

The first fellow that found it though, was a neighborhood nutter.

I had the .177 Marauder stoked with a Crosman Premier Heavy and standing against the door frame, at the ready. I was surfing The Yellow, and some motion outside the window caught my eye; it was a nutter eating up that bird seed and corn.

I walked out to the balcony door, got the Marauder up, flicked off the safety, and slowly opened the balcony door with a squeak. The nutter was watching me, from about 25 yards away. He was almost prone on the ground, eating that feed.

I braced the Marauder on the door frame and lined up the shot. He was moving his head around, so I lined up the crosshairs on his upper torso, seeking the lung/heart shot. I squeezed the trigger. "TOONG....WOP" The CPH found its home. The squirrel jumped and flipped end-over-end, one and a half times, landing right on his back.

...then, he dashed across the yard. "What the hell?" says I. Now this is not 50 ft-lb. 25 cal. Condor. It is a .177 Marauder, at the factory tune, shooting a CPH at about 16 ft-lbs. and 880 fps. But that should have been plenty to drill this little guy straight through. I expected him to take maybe a couple hops, then die.

I went out and looked for him. Nowhere to be found.

I guess it's possible I grazed him, but that was a solid 'WOP' when the pellet hit him.

Now please, don't tell me: "Shoulda bought a .22" Because if this 10.5 gr. .177 didn't have the power to penetrate him at ~880 fps, (18 FPE) then I don't think a .22 would have either, with its slower MV and wider pellet.

I guess I have to admit that it was not a prime shot. (sigh)

Anyone else have a story about a seemingly pellet-proof squirrel?
and had them run off after absorbing a 19 ft-lb .22 shock from the HW80K. I think the "off-switch" on squirrels is very small, and if the pellet doesn't trip the switch, they will escape. Once again, the all important factor is placement.
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Joined: August 28th, 2011, 4:15 am

December 7th, 2011, 2:56 pm #5

<p>Seems like the only sure thing with them is a brain or spine shot.</p><p>I posted this story on another forum, and one member replied that he shot a squirrel in the head with his 700 fps .22 CO2 "pistol" and it took off the rear part of the skull and proceeded down the spine and into the body. Ammo used was an RWS Super H-Point. Wow.</p>
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Joined: May 21st, 2009, 5:46 pm

December 8th, 2011, 5:57 pm #6

The other day, I put down some bird feed across the yard to try to lure in all the darned European Sparrows that are a blight to the neighborhood.

The first fellow that found it though, was a neighborhood nutter.

I had the .177 Marauder stoked with a Crosman Premier Heavy and standing against the door frame, at the ready. I was surfing The Yellow, and some motion outside the window caught my eye; it was a nutter eating up that bird seed and corn.

I walked out to the balcony door, got the Marauder up, flicked off the safety, and slowly opened the balcony door with a squeak. The nutter was watching me, from about 25 yards away. He was almost prone on the ground, eating that feed.

I braced the Marauder on the door frame and lined up the shot. He was moving his head around, so I lined up the crosshairs on his upper torso, seeking the lung/heart shot. I squeezed the trigger. "TOONG....WOP" The CPH found its home. The squirrel jumped and flipped end-over-end, one and a half times, landing right on his back.

...then, he dashed across the yard. "What the hell?" says I. Now this is not 50 ft-lb. 25 cal. Condor. It is a .177 Marauder, at the factory tune, shooting a CPH at about 16 ft-lbs. and 880 fps. But that should have been plenty to drill this little guy straight through. I expected him to take maybe a couple hops, then die.

I went out and looked for him. Nowhere to be found.

I guess it's possible I grazed him, but that was a solid 'WOP' when the pellet hit him.

Now please, don't tell me: "Shoulda bought a .22" Because if this 10.5 gr. .177 didn't have the power to penetrate him at ~880 fps, (18 FPE) then I don't think a .22 would have either, with its slower MV and wider pellet.

I guess I have to admit that it was not a prime shot. (sigh)

Anyone else have a story about a seemingly pellet-proof squirrel?
I have shot them with a .22 rifle (Before my airgun hunting days started) and watched them jump up and run away. On the other hand, I have killed a bunch of squirrels with a Benjamin Silver streak (.177) at 40 to 45 yards. I have killed a few with a .177 Disco at 50 yards. Like Jeremy, I think shot placement is the key.
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Joined: January 20th, 2003, 2:52 pm

December 9th, 2011, 3:21 am #7

The other day, I put down some bird feed across the yard to try to lure in all the darned European Sparrows that are a blight to the neighborhood.

The first fellow that found it though, was a neighborhood nutter.

I had the .177 Marauder stoked with a Crosman Premier Heavy and standing against the door frame, at the ready. I was surfing The Yellow, and some motion outside the window caught my eye; it was a nutter eating up that bird seed and corn.

I walked out to the balcony door, got the Marauder up, flicked off the safety, and slowly opened the balcony door with a squeak. The nutter was watching me, from about 25 yards away. He was almost prone on the ground, eating that feed.

I braced the Marauder on the door frame and lined up the shot. He was moving his head around, so I lined up the crosshairs on his upper torso, seeking the lung/heart shot. I squeezed the trigger. "TOONG....WOP" The CPH found its home. The squirrel jumped and flipped end-over-end, one and a half times, landing right on his back.

...then, he dashed across the yard. "What the hell?" says I. Now this is not 50 ft-lb. 25 cal. Condor. It is a .177 Marauder, at the factory tune, shooting a CPH at about 16 ft-lbs. and 880 fps. But that should have been plenty to drill this little guy straight through. I expected him to take maybe a couple hops, then die.

I went out and looked for him. Nowhere to be found.

I guess it's possible I grazed him, but that was a solid 'WOP' when the pellet hit him.

Now please, don't tell me: "Shoulda bought a .22" Because if this 10.5 gr. .177 didn't have the power to penetrate him at ~880 fps, (18 FPE) then I don't think a .22 would have either, with its slower MV and wider pellet.

I guess I have to admit that it was not a prime shot. (sigh)

Anyone else have a story about a seemingly pellet-proof squirrel?
no matter what you're using when you're hunting or just plinking. Yes, I've lost a few squirrels because of where I hit them but it was not because it was in .177 caliber.

I've taken countless squirrels with .177s, whether it was with one of my 10 meter match rifles, the TX200, the HW97, PCPs or whatever I was shooting, I can't blame the rifle/caliber for "my mistake". With a grey squirrel, it's hard for them to walk/crawl away from a shot to the brain, I don't take heart lung shots too often because of the obvious.

For me, a shot to the head means their a-- is dead. When taking a shot at the head, because the kill zone is so much smaller, for me it's a clean miss or a clean kill. Knowing my rifles capability with it's ammo help me dispatch those "touch" critters where they fall. Have I lost them at times, yes but it was not because of the rifle/combination (.177, .20, or .22 caliber), it had to do with my inability to put the shot where it was suppose to be. So. ".177 for feathers and .22 for fur", that has to do with individual preferrence as long as the person does it ethically and the animal does not suffer.

If you notice where the heart is located, it does not leave any margine for a miss.



Just my honest but humble opinion,



Fleming

Shoot straight and only once.
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Joined: August 28th, 2011, 4:15 am

December 9th, 2011, 9:56 pm #8

<p>Not only is it small, but for many shots, it would mean having to shoot through an arm or shoulder AND the ribcage!</p><p>I gained a little respect for these buggers, that's for sure.</p>
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Joined: January 20th, 2003, 2:52 pm

December 10th, 2011, 2:55 am #9


Fleming

Shoot straight and only once.
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Joined: November 5th, 2008, 5:53 pm

December 10th, 2011, 7:03 pm #10

The other day, I put down some bird feed across the yard to try to lure in all the darned European Sparrows that are a blight to the neighborhood.

The first fellow that found it though, was a neighborhood nutter.

I had the .177 Marauder stoked with a Crosman Premier Heavy and standing against the door frame, at the ready. I was surfing The Yellow, and some motion outside the window caught my eye; it was a nutter eating up that bird seed and corn.

I walked out to the balcony door, got the Marauder up, flicked off the safety, and slowly opened the balcony door with a squeak. The nutter was watching me, from about 25 yards away. He was almost prone on the ground, eating that feed.

I braced the Marauder on the door frame and lined up the shot. He was moving his head around, so I lined up the crosshairs on his upper torso, seeking the lung/heart shot. I squeezed the trigger. "TOONG....WOP" The CPH found its home. The squirrel jumped and flipped end-over-end, one and a half times, landing right on his back.

...then, he dashed across the yard. "What the hell?" says I. Now this is not 50 ft-lb. 25 cal. Condor. It is a .177 Marauder, at the factory tune, shooting a CPH at about 16 ft-lbs. and 880 fps. But that should have been plenty to drill this little guy straight through. I expected him to take maybe a couple hops, then die.

I went out and looked for him. Nowhere to be found.

I guess it's possible I grazed him, but that was a solid 'WOP' when the pellet hit him.

Now please, don't tell me: "Shoulda bought a .22" Because if this 10.5 gr. .177 didn't have the power to penetrate him at ~880 fps, (18 FPE) then I don't think a .22 would have either, with its slower MV and wider pellet.

I guess I have to admit that it was not a prime shot. (sigh)

Anyone else have a story about a seemingly pellet-proof squirrel?
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Best Regards,
Sixto
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