Would a larger side wheel help on my 12x scope?

Would a larger side wheel help on my 12x scope?

Joined: November 8th, 2008, 11:52 pm

April 15th, 2012, 1:57 am #1

I've got a leapers 4-16x56 on my marauder and was spending some time practicing ranging with it. I have a 4 inch side wheel. Past 40 yards it's really hard to distinguish between 5 yard increments as we all know at 12x. On top of this problem the spacing is really close on the side wheel at these ranges? Would a larger side wheel, say 6 inches help? Anyone have experience with a 6 inch side wheel in this situation? If it helps anyone have a suggestion as to where I can get a larger side wheel?
Thanks
Jerry L.
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Joined: February 13th, 2007, 8:47 pm

April 15th, 2012, 2:40 am #2

It will definitely give you larger spaces between your 5 yard increments but I don't know if you can distinguish the differences (focus in 5 yard increments beyond 40 yards) at 12X.
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-bp
Joined: June 5th, 2009, 4:21 pm

April 15th, 2012, 4:45 am #3

I've got a leapers 4-16x56 on my marauder and was spending some time practicing ranging with it. I have a 4 inch side wheel. Past 40 yards it's really hard to distinguish between 5 yard increments as we all know at 12x. On top of this problem the spacing is really close on the side wheel at these ranges? Would a larger side wheel, say 6 inches help? Anyone have experience with a 6 inch side wheel in this situation? If it helps anyone have a suggestion as to where I can get a larger side wheel?
Thanks
Jerry L.
hi jerry

i have that scope, and had the 4" wheel. i honestly don't think so, or i would have put one on mine.

problem is that even with a 56mm objective, which gives the shallowest depth of field which we can afford, 12x is the limiting factor.

shallowness of field is what you want. you can only achieve it two ways: large objective and high power.

i have spent many hours trying to differentiate between distances beyond 35-40 yards. it just doesn't happen

if you can stand blurry crosshairs, there's one thing you can do

if you throw the crosshairs out of focus in one direction (can't remember which) you will increase the spread of the numbers on your wheel. of course, you'll have to recalibrate the wheel, but after doing so, you'll notice that the numbers are farther apart. you throw the crosshairs out of focus by moving the occular/eyepiece to one extreme, as far as you can tolerae the blurry crosshairs.

it's an ineresting experiment, however i didn't find it very useful, and you probably won't either

another experiment would be to tape a large cardboard wheel onto your 4" wheel and try that. it's very hard for the human eye to recognize any change at the longer distances. one way is to close the eye and re-open it after a 3-5 second pause, and look at the image quickly before your eye 'helps' you focus. even that doesn't yield much help.

i shot today without using the scope to estimate distance at all. just estimating with my eye. i did about as well as i did with any scope (hunter, 12x) except at the 10-20 yard ranges, where the scopes do a pretty good job.

stay well,

-bp
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Joined: October 28th, 2003, 9:58 pm

April 15th, 2012, 11:24 am #4

I've got a leapers 4-16x56 on my marauder and was spending some time practicing ranging with it. I have a 4 inch side wheel. Past 40 yards it's really hard to distinguish between 5 yard increments as we all know at 12x. On top of this problem the spacing is really close on the side wheel at these ranges? Would a larger side wheel, say 6 inches help? Anyone have experience with a 6 inch side wheel in this situation? If it helps anyone have a suggestion as to where I can get a larger side wheel?
Thanks
Jerry L.
.....but if you scope can't resolve accurately you're wasting your time.

In other words, let's say we take 10 ranging samples at 53 yards and mark each one on a paper tape on the wheel. Then we look at how many yards those marks cover on the wheel, and they cover from 51 to 55 yards, then it doesn't matter how big that wheel gets. You're still going to have a ranging sample between 51 and 55 yards with the big wheel. However, your marks on the big wheel will be farther apart. So maybe you'll feel like you're really getting accurate, but you're kidding yourself.

I'm learning that ranging is an art. It takes me a lot of work and I can mess it up in a heartbeat.

K
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Joined: October 19th, 2005, 12:48 am

April 15th, 2012, 11:36 am #5

hi jerry

i have that scope, and had the 4" wheel. i honestly don't think so, or i would have put one on mine.

problem is that even with a 56mm objective, which gives the shallowest depth of field which we can afford, 12x is the limiting factor.

shallowness of field is what you want. you can only achieve it two ways: large objective and high power.

i have spent many hours trying to differentiate between distances beyond 35-40 yards. it just doesn't happen

if you can stand blurry crosshairs, there's one thing you can do

if you throw the crosshairs out of focus in one direction (can't remember which) you will increase the spread of the numbers on your wheel. of course, you'll have to recalibrate the wheel, but after doing so, you'll notice that the numbers are farther apart. you throw the crosshairs out of focus by moving the occular/eyepiece to one extreme, as far as you can tolerae the blurry crosshairs.

it's an ineresting experiment, however i didn't find it very useful, and you probably won't either

another experiment would be to tape a large cardboard wheel onto your 4" wheel and try that. it's very hard for the human eye to recognize any change at the longer distances. one way is to close the eye and re-open it after a 3-5 second pause, and look at the image quickly before your eye 'helps' you focus. even that doesn't yield much help.

i shot today without using the scope to estimate distance at all. just estimating with my eye. i did about as well as i did with any scope (hunter, 12x) except at the 10-20 yard ranges, where the scopes do a pretty good job.

stay well,

-bp
Bill, That was a very good perspective! nt
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Joined: November 8th, 2008, 11:52 pm

April 15th, 2012, 1:37 pm #6

.....but if you scope can't resolve accurately you're wasting your time.

In other words, let's say we take 10 ranging samples at 53 yards and mark each one on a paper tape on the wheel. Then we look at how many yards those marks cover on the wheel, and they cover from 51 to 55 yards, then it doesn't matter how big that wheel gets. You're still going to have a ranging sample between 51 and 55 yards with the big wheel. However, your marks on the big wheel will be farther apart. So maybe you'll feel like you're really getting accurate, but you're kidding yourself.

I'm learning that ranging is an art. It takes me a lot of work and I can mess it up in a heartbeat.

K
Appreciate the info. I am understanding more the short coming and problems with lower magnification. I guess there is no substitution for my "secret weapon" .....practice.

thanks again
Jerry L.
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Joined: February 12th, 2009, 3:46 am

April 16th, 2012, 1:58 am #7

I've got a leapers 4-16x56 on my marauder and was spending some time practicing ranging with it. I have a 4 inch side wheel. Past 40 yards it's really hard to distinguish between 5 yard increments as we all know at 12x. On top of this problem the spacing is really close on the side wheel at these ranges? Would a larger side wheel, say 6 inches help? Anyone have experience with a 6 inch side wheel in this situation? If it helps anyone have a suggestion as to where I can get a larger side wheel?
Thanks
Jerry L.
Have you checked your drop off at 40-50 yards? my guess is you're shooting say cpls or JSB over 900 fps and trajectory might be relatively flat at that distance anyway? I tried HFT and for the life of me I'm so wobbly I couldn't tell what dot I was on anyway! LOL. So for me at least it was a crap shoot!



Andy Wong aka larspawn@ameritech.net
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