Why does Crosman use brass barrel on 39x?

Why does Crosman use brass barrel on 39x?

Joined: March 17th, 2006, 4:20 am

March 19th, 2017, 8:34 pm #1

Is it because it's easier to rifle the barrel thus cheaper? I would imagine brass is more expensive than steel. Also brass rifling probably doesn't last as long as steel rifling either. What's their reason for going with brass barrel?
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Joined: July 24th, 2005, 2:05 pm

March 19th, 2017, 9:23 pm #2

It's my understanding that Crosman, and for decades before, Benjamin and Sheridan, used brass for barrels and compression tubes (main body of rifle) because pumping and firing could generate moisture, which would quickly rust a steel barrel (even though Crosman had lots of pumpers with all-steel construction). Brass was impervious to corrosion from moisture. Plus brass is easy to machine, is easy on factory tooling, and can be soldered together into subassemblies.
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Joined: March 28th, 2002, 6:54 pm

March 19th, 2017, 10:07 pm #3

Is it because it's easier to rifle the barrel thus cheaper? I would imagine brass is more expensive than steel. Also brass rifling probably doesn't last as long as steel rifling either. What's their reason for going with brass barrel?
mirror bores after decades of use. Many times the stock is rotted, the pivots shot, and the seals toast after decades as a heavily used barn gun, but a rebuild and new wood will yield a gun more accurate than a brand new one.

Lead on brass is a low friction combination, and brass is easier to rifle than steel, so the slight difference in cost is more than compensated for, even without considering the corrosion resistance advantage.

Short of abuse, a brass bore will last as long as a steel one under airgun conditions.
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

March 19th, 2017, 10:08 pm #4

Is it because it's easier to rifle the barrel thus cheaper? I would imagine brass is more expensive than steel. Also brass rifling probably doesn't last as long as steel rifling either. What's their reason for going with brass barrel?
was cost.. Back when a lot of these guns were being developed, american pipe ( gauge measured pipe) was really cheap and locally available.( before the china CNC era). So , as opposed to needing a ton of manual machinists simply making sub assemblies, It was easier to use Known pipe gauges.. Thats my understanding.. and im sure the barrel decision was also based on the available materials ( locally
Last edited by robnewyork on March 19th, 2017, 10:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 31st, 2005, 5:24 am

March 20th, 2017, 5:43 am #5

Is it because it's easier to rifle the barrel thus cheaper? I would imagine brass is more expensive than steel. Also brass rifling probably doesn't last as long as steel rifling either. What's their reason for going with brass barrel?
I had a Benji 317 as a kid. I would guesstimate at least 100,000 shots fired thru it. Took many a rabbit and squirrel with it. I rebuilt it several times and it had been pumped so much there was probably easily 50 to 75 thousands clearance between the pump tube and the pump rod assembly. I scoped it with a weaver .22 scope and the best ammo back then was the benji in the green can. Never ever cleaned the barrel and it was mirror bright after all that shooting and was just as accurate as when it was brand new. Bronze is not as hard as steel but has amazing wear characteristics, and without abuse such as shooting steel BB's, or cleaning it from the muzzle with a steel rod and wire brush I don't think you will ever wear the barrel out. I am certain I can go get it out now, pump it up, and it will shoot just as hard and accurate as ever.
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Joined: September 26th, 2003, 12:11 am

March 21st, 2017, 2:52 am #6

were phosphor bronze.
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Joined: January 28th, 2005, 1:48 pm

March 30th, 2017, 4:28 pm #7

Is it because it's easier to rifle the barrel thus cheaper? I would imagine brass is more expensive than steel. Also brass rifling probably doesn't last as long as steel rifling either. What's their reason for going with brass barrel?
As Tom noted, the expansion of compressed air causes condensation to form in the barrel, and a steel barrel would have to be regularly oiled. Brass is a little more xpensove than steel, but you don't need much, as the pressures are very low compared to a firearm, and it's much easier to work than steel.
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