While there are a lot of "thumbs down" on combination.............

While there are a lot of "thumbs down" on combination.............

Joined: July 11th, 2001, 7:44 pm

March 7th, 2007, 7:37 pm #1

<P>lathe/milling machines, how about a heavier combo like this Grizzly unit.........</P>
<P><IMG id=ctl01_LargeImage style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 0px; WIDTH: 500px; HEIGHT: 500px; BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 0px" src="http://images.grizzly.com/grizzlycom/pi ... 1.jpg"></P>
<P>It has these specs.........</P>
<P>Specifications:
  • Swing over bed: 12"
  • Swing over cross slide: 6-7/8"
  • Distance between centers: 39"
  • Spindle: Intrinsic 6" back plate
  • Lathe spindle bore: 1-1/2"
  • Spindle nose taper: MT#5
  • Tailstock barrel travel: 3"
  • Cross slide travel: 9"
  • Top slide travel: 3"
  • Spindle to work table: 14-1/4"
  • Spindle travel (drill): 5"
  • Spindle taper (drill): MT#3
  • Number of speeds: 9 lathe / 9 mill/drill
  • Lathe speed range: 345, 470, 560, 655, 825, 915, 1330, 1655, 1960 RPM
  • Mill/drill speed range: 435, 510, 735, 780, 915, 1195, 1663, 2000, 2345 RPM
  • Range of threads (inches): 11 TPI - 40 TPI in 20 Steps (Gear changes required)
  • Range of threads (metric): 14 @ 0.5 - 3.0mm
  • Milling head motor size (Single Phase 220V): 3/4 H.P.
  • Lathe motor size (Single-phase, 220V): 1-1/2 H.P.
  • Approximate shipping weight: 1216 lbs.</LI>
<P>The capacity is there and the cross slide does have a sliding table with t-slots for securing work.</P>
<P>At about $3200, what do y'all think?</P>
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Joined: October 16th, 2005, 10:09 pm

March 7th, 2007, 7:48 pm #2

if absolutely necessary but you will find every quickly having separate machines will come in handy. Combos sound like a good idea but they are cumbersome to use.

Adam in SoCal
A is A
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Joined: January 7th, 2007, 1:03 am

March 7th, 2007, 8:20 pm #3

<P>lathe/milling machines, how about a heavier combo like this Grizzly unit.........</P>
<P><IMG id=ctl01_LargeImage style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 0px; WIDTH: 500px; HEIGHT: 500px; BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 0px" src="http://images.grizzly.com/grizzlycom/pi ... 1.jpg"></P>
<P>It has these specs.........</P>
<P>Specifications:
  • Swing over bed: 12"
  • Swing over cross slide: 6-7/8"
  • Distance between centers: 39"
  • Spindle: Intrinsic 6" back plate
  • Lathe spindle bore: 1-1/2"
  • Spindle nose taper: MT#5
  • Tailstock barrel travel: 3"
  • Cross slide travel: 9"
  • Top slide travel: 3"
  • Spindle to work table: 14-1/4"
  • Spindle travel (drill): 5"
  • Spindle taper (drill): MT#3
  • Number of speeds: 9 lathe / 9 mill/drill
  • Lathe speed range: 345, 470, 560, 655, 825, 915, 1330, 1655, 1960 RPM
  • Mill/drill speed range: 435, 510, 735, 780, 915, 1195, 1663, 2000, 2345 RPM
  • Range of threads (inches): 11 TPI - 40 TPI in 20 Steps (Gear changes required)
  • Range of threads (metric): 14 @ 0.5 - 3.0mm
  • Milling head motor size (Single Phase 220V): 3/4 H.P.
  • Lathe motor size (Single-phase, 220V): 1-1/2 H.P.
  • Approximate shipping weight: 1216 lbs.</LI>
<P>The capacity is there and the cross slide does have a sliding table with t-slots for securing work.</P>
<P>At about $3200, what do y'all think?</P>
everything I have read on these machines is that they are ok in use it is just changing configurations to use as something else that is time consuming. Also people complain of having to support the part they want to cut in the mill config because the spindle will not get down to the table. Your also depending on using the lathes cross slide as your Y axis for the mill and the travel of the lathe here is usually not very far.

Now I have read some people love their 3in1's and they do work but I really think of it more as a machine you might want on a farm for occasional use when you need to do something inparticular but don't want to have 2 machines. Where a brake drum might fit well on the mill table to drill out a broken bolt a small trigger or sear on the same setup would be more difficult to setup.

Read around on them well before you get one.


Dee

faee
etetg
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Joined: May 12th, 2005, 1:57 am

March 7th, 2007, 11:21 pm #4

<P>lathe/milling machines, how about a heavier combo like this Grizzly unit.........</P>
<P><IMG id=ctl01_LargeImage style="BORDER-TOP-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-LEFT-WIDTH: 0px; BORDER-BOTTOM-WIDTH: 0px; WIDTH: 500px; HEIGHT: 500px; BORDER-RIGHT-WIDTH: 0px" src="http://images.grizzly.com/grizzlycom/pi ... 1.jpg"></P>
<P>It has these specs.........</P>
<P>Specifications:
  • Swing over bed: 12"
  • Swing over cross slide: 6-7/8"
  • Distance between centers: 39"
  • Spindle: Intrinsic 6" back plate
  • Lathe spindle bore: 1-1/2"
  • Spindle nose taper: MT#5
  • Tailstock barrel travel: 3"
  • Cross slide travel: 9"
  • Top slide travel: 3"
  • Spindle to work table: 14-1/4"
  • Spindle travel (drill): 5"
  • Spindle taper (drill): MT#3
  • Number of speeds: 9 lathe / 9 mill/drill
  • Lathe speed range: 345, 470, 560, 655, 825, 915, 1330, 1655, 1960 RPM
  • Mill/drill speed range: 435, 510, 735, 780, 915, 1195, 1663, 2000, 2345 RPM
  • Range of threads (inches): 11 TPI - 40 TPI in 20 Steps (Gear changes required)
  • Range of threads (metric): 14 @ 0.5 - 3.0mm
  • Milling head motor size (Single Phase 220V): 3/4 H.P.
  • Lathe motor size (Single-phase, 220V): 1-1/2 H.P.
  • Approximate shipping weight: 1216 lbs.</LI>
<P>The capacity is there and the cross slide does have a sliding table with t-slots for securing work.</P>
<P>At about $3200, what do y'all think?</P>
and it was a useful machine for that much money I would definitely get into a 12 inch gear head lathe and a large Mill Drill machine like the Lathemaster mill I have. Dedicated machines are just nice to have and usually a seperate machine is going to be better at what it does than a machine that has to wear two or three hats if you know what I mean. I think that the lathe is around $1500.00 and the Mill is also around $1500.00. If you are space confined then a machine like that might make sense but I would recommend seperate machines if at all possible. You might try to find some nice old american iron as well. I know we have a local classifieds paper and there is always someone selling a lathe or mill. Good luck with whatever you get and don't hesitate to ask any questions....



Pete Matos
865-363-9218
matospeter@bellsouth.net
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Joined: July 11th, 2001, 7:44 pm

March 8th, 2007, 1:07 am #5

I did do a search on Ebay for used lathes but I can get a new 12" import with a 1 1/2" spindle bore for what the used (and perhaps worn out) American iron sold for.

Thanks for the input! I was thinking a larger spindle bore than 3/4" would be useful but I have worked with a precision live center in my tailstock up to now and it does seem to work. In your opinion, what would be the main benefit of a lathe with larger spindle bore other than the fact that it will be heavier, more ridgid and have more power?

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Joined: May 8th, 2001, 4:06 pm

March 8th, 2007, 1:54 am #6

Hi ed. You might try a search on Craigslist, if you don't already. There are machines that come up even here in the black hole of machine tools, and you can limit the search to whats in reasonable proximity;

<a href="http://geo.craigslist.org/iso/us/wv</a" target="_new" rel="nofollow">http://geo.craigslist.org/iso/us/wv</a>

"would be the main benefit of a lathe with larger spindle bore other than the fact that it will be heavier, more ridgid and have more power?"

Isn't that enuf? On size, I'd factor in how much room I have, cost, and how much time I have to set stuff up. Some of us have to work, you know, to support the hobbies. I made some guides on a machine with a 3/4" hole, and didn't know how long and hard I was making it until I got to use a bigger machine with a 1&3/8" hole. You use what you have, but if you have a choice and the $, definitely go for the larger spindle. Its like a quick change v. change gears machine. The one just makes it quicker, simpler and easier to get to the same result.
Last edited by eeler1 on March 8th, 2007, 5:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 12th, 2005, 1:57 am

March 8th, 2007, 1:47 pm #7

I did do a search on Ebay for used lathes but I can get a new 12" import with a 1 1/2" spindle bore for what the used (and perhaps worn out) American iron sold for.

Thanks for the input! I was thinking a larger spindle bore than 3/4" would be useful but I have worked with a precision live center in my tailstock up to now and it does seem to work. In your opinion, what would be the main benefit of a lathe with larger spindle bore other than the fact that it will be heavier, more ridgid and have more power?
besides the ovious advantage of being able to work directly on the end of a piece close to the chuck for more accuracy. Internal threading of a piece in the bore is easier and more rigid. Another advantage is that with a larger spindle bore you are now capable of using a collet chuck or a collet closing type of workholding device. These can be the most accurate kind of workholding available for the lathe and are especially nice for the smaller diameter parts like valves and the like. Still another advantage is that like my machine you can use a spindle taper reducing spacer that allows the use of many different taper centers or lathe dogs. Most things I turn I am able to stick thru the bore and some guys even build bore stops that allow you to do multiple parts and slide them into the bore to the stop for repetitive accuracy on cutting position. I used this feature recently for a bunch of stainless steel cabinet feet I made for a custom application at the University of Tennesse football stadium renovation. Stainless is a pain to machine but the larger machine took care of it with no problems. The southbend lathe posted in another of the recent threads is a nice example of what can be had if you take some time to look around at what is available. I kinda wish I did but I am still very happy with my large asian lathe. It has as I said performed without problem for almost 8 years and I am not easy on it sometimes. Good Luck...

Pete Matos
865-363-9218
matospeter@bellsouth.net
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Joined: July 11th, 2001, 7:44 pm

March 8th, 2007, 3:31 pm #8

<P>how do you use them in a lathe for random size parts (like a homemade R9 piston that's 1.015 OD). </P>
<P>I wasn't pleased with the runout of a piece of drill rod mounted in my cheap (there's that word again) 5" 3 jaw chuck (.003tir)&nbsp;so I've been using my 5" independent 4 jaw chuck. A bit of a pain to setup a R9 piston tube, machine, test fit, remount to within .001tir on my cheap dial indicator, and "so on and so forth" to keep the different cuts relatively concentric. Seems that collets would be an answer to my dilema but I don't know what the "adjustment range" of a collet is, or if there is an "adjustment range". The collets I bought for my mill/drill are sized for 1/2" or 3/8" shank endmills so I'm pretty ignorant concerning collet use.</P>
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Joined: May 8th, 2001, 4:06 pm

March 8th, 2007, 8:17 pm #9

I forgot about collets.

On the smaller spindles, like my 9" Logan, I can use AT collets that can handle a workpiece of up to 3/4". Theres a draw bar you put thru the spindle and the collet is threaded into it, with a nose piece to hold the collet in place. So for small diameter parts, you don't have to fool around with the 4 jaw chuck but should get less runout than with a 3 jaw.

Most machines that have a spindle bore of 1.375"-1.5" will take a 5c collet setup, and can handle a workpiece of up to 1&1/8" diameter.

Collets are another way to spend money, but are pretty handy in saving time if thats important. May be worth it.
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Joined: November 9th, 2005, 1:19 am

March 9th, 2007, 12:08 pm #10

<P>how do you use them in a lathe for random size parts (like a homemade R9 piston that's 1.015 OD). </P>
<P>I wasn't pleased with the runout of a piece of drill rod mounted in my cheap (there's that word again) 5" 3 jaw chuck (.003tir)&nbsp;so I've been using my 5" independent 4 jaw chuck. A bit of a pain to setup a R9 piston tube, machine, test fit, remount to within .001tir on my cheap dial indicator, and "so on and so forth" to keep the different cuts relatively concentric. Seems that collets would be an answer to my dilema but I don't know what the "adjustment range" of a collet is, or if there is an "adjustment range". The collets I bought for my mill/drill are sized for 1/2" or 3/8" shank endmills so I'm pretty ignorant concerning collet use.</P>
be ordered in 1/64 inch increments (1-1/64 equals 1.0156) or you can order any special size you want from a company such as Hardinge Brothers. Metric collets are also available. You can also order step chucks bored to the desired diameter and depth (these will be heat-treated). Provided of course that a closer can be mounted on the spindle nose. Or order emergency collets and step chucks, and bore them to any size. Naturally these will be in the 'soft' state.

If you run off multile pieces that require a secondary operation, and the O.A.L. is critical, then use a dead-length collet for the secondary. Provide the part isn't too long. A standard collet with a stop will give different O.A.L.s depending on how much the O.D. varies on the parts. A dead-length collet will hold O.A.L. dead-on.
Last edited by WobblesAlot on March 9th, 2007, 12:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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