What's the closest tolerance you guys can consistently hold?.....

What's the closest tolerance you guys can consistently hold?.....

Joined: December 3rd, 2010, 5:56 pm

May 1st, 2012, 3:18 pm #1

Just curious what you guys aim for in general for ferrous/non-ferrous. I understand it'll depend on the particular part, material size, etc. In my case, I shoot for .001 with lathe or mill. Sometimes I get lucky too and somehow get .0005 once in a great while for a micro-second.

Dave
Last edited by AKSevenDave on May 1st, 2012, 3:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 21st, 2001, 3:36 am

May 1st, 2012, 4:49 pm #2

I can get +/- .003 without trying, .0015 when I work at it, .001 with obsession and sandpaper.

With experience and equipment tweaking, I doubt .001 should be a problem. So far though, most of my projects have been plastics and soft metals, as I start to work with more steel it may get harder.

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Joined: December 3rd, 2010, 5:56 pm

May 1st, 2012, 5:38 pm #3

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Joined: March 6th, 2002, 3:54 am

May 1st, 2012, 8:14 pm #4

Just curious what you guys aim for in general for ferrous/non-ferrous. I understand it'll depend on the particular part, material size, etc. In my case, I shoot for .001 with lathe or mill. Sometimes I get lucky too and somehow get .0005 once in a great while for a micro-second.

Dave
I can do +,- .0005 on manual machine if I need to on a part but I wouldn't worry about that kind of tollerance for most items. Typical three place decimal tolerance is +,- .005. Some parts need to be held at extremely tight tolerances and others don't, so I machine it accordingly.

Shoot Safe,

Bryan
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Joined: January 31st, 2010, 8:47 am

May 2nd, 2012, 4:15 pm #5

Just curious what you guys aim for in general for ferrous/non-ferrous. I understand it'll depend on the particular part, material size, etc. In my case, I shoot for .001 with lathe or mill. Sometimes I get lucky too and somehow get .0005 once in a great while for a micro-second.

Dave
I can achieve a 0.0005" (half ten-thousandth) tolerance for a single operation using a little creativity with my benchtop machines if I need to.
For many hobby projects +/- 0.050" is usually OK. Very few hobby tasks will require better than +/- 0.010" accuracy.
For Gunsmith work, 0.001" tolerance is usually fine for the most critical operations.

Machinists are expected to make parts to a 0.001" accuracy standard and working to this standard usually requires 4 or more years of experience/training (8000 hours). Before you say this is easy consider a part with several bored holes, a turned radius and several machined pockets with a trapezoidal profile. Most students can't make a 1" square block to a 0.001" tolerance standard in one hour until they receive 3 or more full semesters of training. Fortunately, most parts fall within this 0.001" accuracy standard.

Tool and die makers are frequently expected to work within a 0.0001" accuracy standard and very few tool and die makers have less than 15-20 years experience as a machinist.

Tolerance is machine related as well... grinding machines easily work within a 0.0001" tolerance and better. To achieve high standards of accuracy requires a sound equipment foundation and machines with considerable mass to dampen and/or eliminate harmonic vibration. Very few benchtop machines can compete accuracy wise with machines that easily have 10 times the mass of the benchtop machines usually found in a home workshop.



Airguns are a gas

Boomer
Last edited by Boomer_Mikey on May 8th, 2012, 8:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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