What about lead poisoning the birds?

What about lead poisoning the birds?

Joined: July 3rd, 2010, 9:15 pm

April 14th, 2012, 12:59 am #1

There are now close to 20K rounds off my pcps, 99% at spinners and traps, but they spatter.
My land is rife w/ ground foraging RG Turkeys, Francolin, Kalij, Barred Doves, lacenecks,
and lots of smaller finch and sparrow, that eat seed if i lay it.
Now i am ruminating about these birds foraging across my shooting range, a daily occurrence.
They are so stupid they might well start a habit of picking up pellet spatter and bits...

somebody tell me i'm wrong pls.


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Joined: November 27th, 2009, 1:08 am

April 14th, 2012, 1:08 am #2

If they DO eat some, they will die.
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Joined: February 25th, 2009, 1:05 pm

April 14th, 2012, 1:11 am #3

There are now close to 20K rounds off my pcps, 99% at spinners and traps, but they spatter.
My land is rife w/ ground foraging RG Turkeys, Francolin, Kalij, Barred Doves, lacenecks,
and lots of smaller finch and sparrow, that eat seed if i lay it.
Now i am ruminating about these birds foraging across my shooting range, a daily occurrence.
They are so stupid they might well start a habit of picking up pellet spatter and bits...

somebody tell me i'm wrong pls.


If you do your part cleaning after yourself. I contain my lead in a duct seal box, when full..I melt and use it for fishing weight. I might be doing LEAD POISONING THE FISH when I snag my line and deposit the lead underwater.
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Joined: October 15th, 2002, 6:54 pm

April 14th, 2012, 1:13 am #4

There are now close to 20K rounds off my pcps, 99% at spinners and traps, but they spatter.
My land is rife w/ ground foraging RG Turkeys, Francolin, Kalij, Barred Doves, lacenecks,
and lots of smaller finch and sparrow, that eat seed if i lay it.
Now i am ruminating about these birds foraging across my shooting range, a daily occurrence.
They are so stupid they might well start a habit of picking up pellet spatter and bits...

somebody tell me i'm wrong pls.


You're wrong. Birds that eat bugs won't eat anything that doesn't move, and birds that eat seeds will quickly spit it out if they can't crack it. Birds, despite being birdbrained, are actually pretty smart about what the put in thier mouths. They actually have it all over us in this regard. A young human will put just about anything it finds in its mouth.

Your birds are safe on your range, as long as you keep the crosshairs off them.

I think we're all Bozos on this bus.
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Joined: April 1st, 2009, 3:18 am

April 14th, 2012, 1:15 am #5

There are now close to 20K rounds off my pcps, 99% at spinners and traps, but they spatter.
My land is rife w/ ground foraging RG Turkeys, Francolin, Kalij, Barred Doves, lacenecks,
and lots of smaller finch and sparrow, that eat seed if i lay it.
Now i am ruminating about these birds foraging across my shooting range, a daily occurrence.
They are so stupid they might well start a habit of picking up pellet spatter and bits...

somebody tell me i'm wrong pls.


Good practice is to clean your range. If the EPA did a sweep of the property, you may be in trouble. One thing I have always done is shoot into a backstop that allows me to gather all the lead. Once a coffee can has been filled, it is melted then turned in for a few bucks. Last price for lead I got was .48 a pound. Turned in a little over 10lbs.

Yeah, birds will gobble up the lead. Not good.

"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
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Joined: April 1st, 2009, 3:18 am

April 14th, 2012, 1:20 am #6

You're wrong. Birds that eat bugs won't eat anything that doesn't move, and birds that eat seeds will quickly spit it out if they can't crack it. Birds, despite being birdbrained, are actually pretty smart about what the put in thier mouths. They actually have it all over us in this regard. A young human will put just about anything it finds in its mouth.

Your birds are safe on your range, as long as you keep the crosshairs off them.

I think we're all Bozos on this bus.
Birds that have/use a gizzard will in fact ingest the pellets. Many peer review journals on such topic. Not to mention I have seen birds pick up my pellets.

"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
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Joined: September 21st, 2011, 10:19 pm

April 14th, 2012, 2:35 am #7

There are now close to 20K rounds off my pcps, 99% at spinners and traps, but they spatter.
My land is rife w/ ground foraging RG Turkeys, Francolin, Kalij, Barred Doves, lacenecks,
and lots of smaller finch and sparrow, that eat seed if i lay it.
Now i am ruminating about these birds foraging across my shooting range, a daily occurrence.
They are so stupid they might well start a habit of picking up pellet spatter and bits...

somebody tell me i'm wrong pls.


As one of the "new kids on the block" I initially allowed the lead to escape into the environment. I quickly realized that I was going to pollute my yard so I built a pellet trap. It's little more than a plywood box on legs. Inside the box is a piece of 1/4" steel plate sloped downward onto which the pellets impact and splatter to the bottom of the box hitting another piece of metal. Targets are taped to a piece of corrugated plastic sign board on the front of the box. I suspect this thing would stop a .22LR with out problem and it cost me all of around $20 to build. Now the only lead that escapes are squirrel pass-throughs or misses. Why not make several such traps and place them behind your regular targets with one deep enough to house the spinners. Then get out there with the shopvac and clean up the loose lead.
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Joined: March 19th, 2011, 2:50 am

April 14th, 2012, 3:05 am #8

There are now close to 20K rounds off my pcps, 99% at spinners and traps, but they spatter.
My land is rife w/ ground foraging RG Turkeys, Francolin, Kalij, Barred Doves, lacenecks,
and lots of smaller finch and sparrow, that eat seed if i lay it.
Now i am ruminating about these birds foraging across my shooting range, a daily occurrence.
They are so stupid they might well start a habit of picking up pellet spatter and bits...

somebody tell me i'm wrong pls.


http://news.yahoo.com/bald-eagle-crossh ... 01272.html

Article is talking about powder burners used in hunting and scavengers consuming gut piles, etc., but thought it might be of interest.
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Joined: July 17th, 2011, 8:44 pm

April 14th, 2012, 5:43 am #9

As one of the "new kids on the block" I initially allowed the lead to escape into the environment. I quickly realized that I was going to pollute my yard so I built a pellet trap. It's little more than a plywood box on legs. Inside the box is a piece of 1/4" steel plate sloped downward onto which the pellets impact and splatter to the bottom of the box hitting another piece of metal. Targets are taped to a piece of corrugated plastic sign board on the front of the box. I suspect this thing would stop a .22LR with out problem and it cost me all of around $20 to build. Now the only lead that escapes are squirrel pass-throughs or misses. Why not make several such traps and place them behind your regular targets with one deep enough to house the spinners. Then get out there with the shopvac and clean up the loose lead.
unless it's HEPA filtered, otherwise your filling the air with lead dust.
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Joined: February 9th, 2006, 10:35 pm

April 14th, 2012, 12:12 pm #10

http://news.yahoo.com/bald-eagle-crossh ... 01272.html

Article is talking about powder burners used in hunting and scavengers consuming gut piles, etc., but thought it might be of interest.
Scavengers consuming gut piles are always interesting. lol

I plink, therefore I am.
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