Upgrading the Remington Field Targets with a spring

Joined: June 22nd, 2001, 8:18 pm

October 30th, 2014, 3:13 am #1

I was surprised to find that the Remington field targets didn't use a spring to apply pressure to the face to keep it engaged and aide in making the target face fall when hit. The Remington targets are basically a copy of the Gamo/Knockover targets that use a spring. So I decided to add a spring to one of my targets to see how it works with the spring and withoug the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm.

I found a torsion spring on the McMaster-Carr website. It is a 0.059" wire diameter with a max rod diameter of 0.335" so it would easily slip over the 0.29" pivot bolt. Here is a link to the spring I bought:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#9271k609/=udblpp




The first thing to do is remove the pivot bolt using 13mm and 14mm wrenches.

Next, cut a slot on the right side of the base front using a hacksaw. The slot should be about 1/8" deep. Make sure to cut the slot far enough left of the right side to clear the pivot ear of the target face.






Use a small round or triangle file to smooth and widen the slot so that the spring leg can fit into the slot.






Now partially reassemble the target but only push the pivot bolt about halfway through and slide the spring onto the pivot bolt. Make sure to slide it all the way over to the right side of the pivot bolt and slide the pivot bolt through the left side of the target. Make sure to rest the front leg of the spring into the slot on the base. Do bother installing the nut just yet.




Bend the front leg of the spring down into the slot. I held the spring in place using some pliers to apply pressure to the rear of the spring so that it was pressed up against the rear of the pivot bolt. Bend the front leg down as far as you can. Remove the spring. Hold the spring on the spring side of the bend with a pair needle nose pliers and bend the front leg down a bit more so that it will lie flush with the target base face. Note that I also used a file to round and smooth the ends of the spring so they aren't sharp. I also cut off about an inch off of the front leg of the spring after it was bent. I also bent the rear leg of the spring just a little bit about 1/4" from the end so that the end of the spring doesn't scrap the target face.

Now reassemble the sping onto the pivot bolt and reassemble the target.




Now bend the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm out of the way so that it no longer touches the paddle arms at any point of it's travel.




Now test the target to make sure a face hit won't trip the target. If it does, you can file a very little amount of the front foot of the paddle arm to increase the trip energy. WARNING: do this very sparingly as only a little material removed can make the target not work properly. A little goes a long way.

This upgrade has improved the lockup of the target and it trips more easily so lower power rifles will take it down easily. I also replace the push on nuts with some from Lowes and they work better. I hammered my down tight and then manually moved the paddle arm forward and back until it loosened up a bit.

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Joined: November 17th, 2013, 3:41 pm

October 30th, 2014, 10:30 am #2

Appreciate you taking the time to share this idea. I have 9 of them and they all worked great with my 20 FPE rifles right out of the box, but I did feel the need for improvement and this is just what the doctor ordered
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Joined: June 8th, 2014, 9:45 pm

October 30th, 2014, 11:30 am #3

I was surprised to find that the Remington field targets didn't use a spring to apply pressure to the face to keep it engaged and aide in making the target face fall when hit. The Remington targets are basically a copy of the Gamo/Knockover targets that use a spring. So I decided to add a spring to one of my targets to see how it works with the spring and withoug the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm.

I found a torsion spring on the McMaster-Carr website. It is a 0.059" wire diameter with a max rod diameter of 0.335" so it would easily slip over the 0.29" pivot bolt. Here is a link to the spring I bought:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#9271k609/=udblpp




The first thing to do is remove the pivot bolt using 13mm and 14mm wrenches.

Next, cut a slot on the right side of the base front using a hacksaw. The slot should be about 1/8" deep. Make sure to cut the slot far enough left of the right side to clear the pivot ear of the target face.






Use a small round or triangle file to smooth and widen the slot so that the spring leg can fit into the slot.






Now partially reassemble the target but only push the pivot bolt about halfway through and slide the spring onto the pivot bolt. Make sure to slide it all the way over to the right side of the pivot bolt and slide the pivot bolt through the left side of the target. Make sure to rest the front leg of the spring into the slot on the base. Do bother installing the nut just yet.




Bend the front leg of the spring down into the slot. I held the spring in place using some pliers to apply pressure to the rear of the spring so that it was pressed up against the rear of the pivot bolt. Bend the front leg down as far as you can. Remove the spring. Hold the spring on the spring side of the bend with a pair needle nose pliers and bend the front leg down a bit more so that it will lie flush with the target base face. Note that I also used a file to round and smooth the ends of the spring so they aren't sharp. I also cut off about an inch off of the front leg of the spring after it was bent. I also bent the rear leg of the spring just a little bit about 1/4" from the end so that the end of the spring doesn't scrap the target face.

Now reassemble the sping onto the pivot bolt and reassemble the target.




Now bend the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm out of the way so that it no longer touches the paddle arms at any point of it's travel.




Now test the target to make sure a face hit won't trip the target. If it does, you can file a very little amount of the front foot of the paddle arm to increase the trip energy. WARNING: do this very sparingly as only a little material removed can make the target not work properly. A little goes a long way.

This upgrade has improved the lockup of the target and it trips more easily so lower power rifles will take it down easily. I also replace the push on nuts with some from Lowes and they work better. I hammered my down tight and then manually moved the paddle arm forward and back until it loosened up a bit.
Brad, Thanks for the mod info it .......nt
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Joined: December 10th, 2012, 1:53 pm

October 30th, 2014, 1:18 pm #4

I was surprised to find that the Remington field targets didn't use a spring to apply pressure to the face to keep it engaged and aide in making the target face fall when hit. The Remington targets are basically a copy of the Gamo/Knockover targets that use a spring. So I decided to add a spring to one of my targets to see how it works with the spring and withoug the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm.

I found a torsion spring on the McMaster-Carr website. It is a 0.059" wire diameter with a max rod diameter of 0.335" so it would easily slip over the 0.29" pivot bolt. Here is a link to the spring I bought:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#9271k609/=udblpp




The first thing to do is remove the pivot bolt using 13mm and 14mm wrenches.

Next, cut a slot on the right side of the base front using a hacksaw. The slot should be about 1/8" deep. Make sure to cut the slot far enough left of the right side to clear the pivot ear of the target face.






Use a small round or triangle file to smooth and widen the slot so that the spring leg can fit into the slot.






Now partially reassemble the target but only push the pivot bolt about halfway through and slide the spring onto the pivot bolt. Make sure to slide it all the way over to the right side of the pivot bolt and slide the pivot bolt through the left side of the target. Make sure to rest the front leg of the spring into the slot on the base. Do bother installing the nut just yet.




Bend the front leg of the spring down into the slot. I held the spring in place using some pliers to apply pressure to the rear of the spring so that it was pressed up against the rear of the pivot bolt. Bend the front leg down as far as you can. Remove the spring. Hold the spring on the spring side of the bend with a pair needle nose pliers and bend the front leg down a bit more so that it will lie flush with the target base face. Note that I also used a file to round and smooth the ends of the spring so they aren't sharp. I also cut off about an inch off of the front leg of the spring after it was bent. I also bent the rear leg of the spring just a little bit about 1/4" from the end so that the end of the spring doesn't scrap the target face.

Now reassemble the sping onto the pivot bolt and reassemble the target.




Now bend the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm out of the way so that it no longer touches the paddle arms at any point of it's travel.




Now test the target to make sure a face hit won't trip the target. If it does, you can file a very little amount of the front foot of the paddle arm to increase the trip energy. WARNING: do this very sparingly as only a little material removed can make the target not work properly. A little goes a long way.

This upgrade has improved the lockup of the target and it trips more easily so lower power rifles will take it down easily. I also replace the push on nuts with some from Lowes and they work better. I hammered my down tight and then manually moved the paddle arm forward and back until it loosened up a bit.
procrastinated another couple days...

I used same dimensions for spring but with .045 wire (lower force). Didn't seem like quite enough assist so ended up with two per target. I'll call it redundancy Also drilled the reducer bolt for front mounting:



Tweaked and aligned everything as mentioned in previous posts and targets seem to work well.

Amazon is another source for springs, decent price for 10 packs if you're Prime member and get free shipping:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006UIMG8K/ref=biss_dp_sa1


Danny
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lhd
Joined: January 9th, 2002, 2:30 am

October 30th, 2014, 4:49 pm #5

I was surprised to find that the Remington field targets didn't use a spring to apply pressure to the face to keep it engaged and aide in making the target face fall when hit. The Remington targets are basically a copy of the Gamo/Knockover targets that use a spring. So I decided to add a spring to one of my targets to see how it works with the spring and withoug the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm.

I found a torsion spring on the McMaster-Carr website. It is a 0.059" wire diameter with a max rod diameter of 0.335" so it would easily slip over the 0.29" pivot bolt. Here is a link to the spring I bought:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#9271k609/=udblpp




The first thing to do is remove the pivot bolt using 13mm and 14mm wrenches.

Next, cut a slot on the right side of the base front using a hacksaw. The slot should be about 1/8" deep. Make sure to cut the slot far enough left of the right side to clear the pivot ear of the target face.






Use a small round or triangle file to smooth and widen the slot so that the spring leg can fit into the slot.






Now partially reassemble the target but only push the pivot bolt about halfway through and slide the spring onto the pivot bolt. Make sure to slide it all the way over to the right side of the pivot bolt and slide the pivot bolt through the left side of the target. Make sure to rest the front leg of the spring into the slot on the base. Do bother installing the nut just yet.




Bend the front leg of the spring down into the slot. I held the spring in place using some pliers to apply pressure to the rear of the spring so that it was pressed up against the rear of the pivot bolt. Bend the front leg down as far as you can. Remove the spring. Hold the spring on the spring side of the bend with a pair needle nose pliers and bend the front leg down a bit more so that it will lie flush with the target base face. Note that I also used a file to round and smooth the ends of the spring so they aren't sharp. I also cut off about an inch off of the front leg of the spring after it was bent. I also bent the rear leg of the spring just a little bit about 1/4" from the end so that the end of the spring doesn't scrap the target face.

Now reassemble the sping onto the pivot bolt and reassemble the target.




Now bend the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm out of the way so that it no longer touches the paddle arms at any point of it's travel.




Now test the target to make sure a face hit won't trip the target. If it does, you can file a very little amount of the front foot of the paddle arm to increase the trip energy. WARNING: do this very sparingly as only a little material removed can make the target not work properly. A little goes a long way.

This upgrade has improved the lockup of the target and it trips more easily so lower power rifles will take it down easily. I also replace the push on nuts with some from Lowes and they work better. I hammered my down tight and then manually moved the paddle arm forward and back until it loosened up a bit.
Now just move the reducer to the front of the faceplate and you are good to go.
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Joined: June 2nd, 2014, 10:56 pm

October 30th, 2014, 6:07 pm #6

procrastinated another couple days...

I used same dimensions for spring but with .045 wire (lower force). Didn't seem like quite enough assist so ended up with two per target. I'll call it redundancy Also drilled the reducer bolt for front mounting:



Tweaked and aligned everything as mentioned in previous posts and targets seem to work well.

Amazon is another source for springs, decent price for 10 packs if you're Prime member and get free shipping:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B006UIMG8K/ref=biss_dp_sa1


Danny
Did you just saw off the threaded stud flush with faceplate then drill hole through faceplate for bolt?
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Joined: December 10th, 2012, 1:53 pm

October 30th, 2014, 7:31 pm #7

I drilled from the front of the faceplate with 1/4" bit, roughly aligned with the welded post. When I was mostly thru, I stopped and twisted off the post with channel lock pliers.

Danny
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Joined: June 22nd, 2001, 8:18 pm

October 30th, 2014, 7:54 pm #8

Now just move the reducer to the front of the faceplate and you are good to go.
that is what I am going to do with mine.
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Joined: June 2nd, 2014, 10:56 pm

October 30th, 2014, 8:52 pm #9

I drilled from the front of the faceplate with 1/4" bit, roughly aligned with the welded post. When I was mostly thru, I stopped and twisted off the post with channel lock pliers.

Danny
Thanks. Saves a step from my scenario
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Joined: April 25th, 2008, 12:25 am

October 30th, 2014, 11:40 pm #10

I was surprised to find that the Remington field targets didn't use a spring to apply pressure to the face to keep it engaged and aide in making the target face fall when hit. The Remington targets are basically a copy of the Gamo/Knockover targets that use a spring. So I decided to add a spring to one of my targets to see how it works with the spring and withoug the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm.

I found a torsion spring on the McMaster-Carr website. It is a 0.059" wire diameter with a max rod diameter of 0.335" so it would easily slip over the 0.29" pivot bolt. Here is a link to the spring I bought:

http://www.mcmaster.com/#9271k609/=udblpp




The first thing to do is remove the pivot bolt using 13mm and 14mm wrenches.

Next, cut a slot on the right side of the base front using a hacksaw. The slot should be about 1/8" deep. Make sure to cut the slot far enough left of the right side to clear the pivot ear of the target face.






Use a small round or triangle file to smooth and widen the slot so that the spring leg can fit into the slot.






Now partially reassemble the target but only push the pivot bolt about halfway through and slide the spring onto the pivot bolt. Make sure to slide it all the way over to the right side of the pivot bolt and slide the pivot bolt through the left side of the target. Make sure to rest the front leg of the spring into the slot on the base. Do bother installing the nut just yet.




Bend the front leg of the spring down into the slot. I held the spring in place using some pliers to apply pressure to the rear of the spring so that it was pressed up against the rear of the pivot bolt. Bend the front leg down as far as you can. Remove the spring. Hold the spring on the spring side of the bend with a pair needle nose pliers and bend the front leg down a bit more so that it will lie flush with the target base face. Note that I also used a file to round and smooth the ends of the spring so they aren't sharp. I also cut off about an inch off of the front leg of the spring after it was bent. I also bent the rear leg of the spring just a little bit about 1/4" from the end so that the end of the spring doesn't scrap the target face.

Now reassemble the sping onto the pivot bolt and reassemble the target.




Now bend the retaining clip at the base of the paddle arm out of the way so that it no longer touches the paddle arms at any point of it's travel.




Now test the target to make sure a face hit won't trip the target. If it does, you can file a very little amount of the front foot of the paddle arm to increase the trip energy. WARNING: do this very sparingly as only a little material removed can make the target not work properly. A little goes a long way.

This upgrade has improved the lockup of the target and it trips more easily so lower power rifles will take it down easily. I also replace the push on nuts with some from Lowes and they work better. I hammered my down tight and then manually moved the paddle arm forward and back until it loosened up a bit.
I just did the same modification on my 18 Remingtons !

However I found a MUCH cheaper source for springs ..

My local .99c store has a pack of large plastic spring clamp clothes peg / pins 10 for a dollar and the springs are pretty much perfect if you dismantle them ... they pull part very easily ...

they look pretty much identical to yours ....

thanx for the post and pics .. saved me from doing the same thing !

cheers

JB



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