Tuning for Maximum Spring Compression - Your Guidance Please

Tuning for Maximum Spring Compression - Your Guidance Please

Joined: May 18th, 2012, 10:50 pm

June 14th, 2012, 1:05 am #1

I have a RWS 34. Between the spring and the guide is a 0.7mm thick washer. Can a thicker washer be used to compress the spring to the max? Is there a method other than trial and error to find the thickness of the needed washer?

Would this have to be a single washer or can I keep adding multiple washers until trigger can no longer be cocked? At this point I remove the last washer. Can the washer(s) be add on top of the spring rather than under the spring?

Your guidance please.
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Joined: December 18th, 2009, 3:35 pm

June 14th, 2012, 1:16 am #2

and may result in a very undesirable shot cycle.

Trial and error with a chrony at a certain point you may find things slow down,develop undesirable recoil and become much harder to cock.

If you are after as much power as possible why not contact one of the experienced kit makers or tuners and use there guidance to achieve what you want. They are the experts, using there experience and trial and error they have already done, they can most likely get you the closest to your goal with the least amount of work.

Talk to TGore at Vortek, I'm sure he can help you out.

Bruce
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Joined: September 1st, 2001, 6:38 pm

June 14th, 2012, 2:31 am #3

I have a RWS 34. Between the spring and the guide is a 0.7mm thick washer. Can a thicker washer be used to compress the spring to the max? Is there a method other than trial and error to find the thickness of the needed washer?

Would this have to be a single washer or can I keep adding multiple washers until trigger can no longer be cocked? At this point I remove the last washer. Can the washer(s) be add on top of the spring rather than under the spring?

Your guidance please.
If you do, the rifle won't cock because there's a very-succinct and limited amount of space between the guide and the bottom of the piston skirt.

Spacers are sometimes used as a tool for added compression in various models of spring rifles and pistols, but they usually have to be placed at the other end of the spring--if there's room for any of them at all.

Happy Shooting!

Ed, The Airgun Tune-Meister


"We can rebuild the squirrel. Make him stronger, faster...We have the technology"---Skyler M.
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Joined: October 21st, 2000, 9:30 pm

June 14th, 2012, 2:53 am #4

I have a RWS 34. Between the spring and the guide is a 0.7mm thick washer. Can a thicker washer be used to compress the spring to the max? Is there a method other than trial and error to find the thickness of the needed washer?

Would this have to be a single washer or can I keep adding multiple washers until trigger can no longer be cocked? At this point I remove the last washer. Can the washer(s) be add on top of the spring rather than under the spring?

Your guidance please.
A search may turn up the posts. As Ed says.. there ain't much space available with Diana's stock springs. If it turns out you only have .100" or less available then its not worth effort. RB

"The Universe is comprised mainly of two things.. hydrogen and ignorance."
John Dobson
Inventor, astronomer and metaphysical thinker.
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Joined: May 18th, 2012, 10:50 pm

June 14th, 2012, 3:37 am #5

Available space is the length of the slot in the piston?
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Joined: October 21st, 2000, 9:30 pm

June 14th, 2012, 3:46 am #6

In fact, that slot length isn't a factor.

"The Universe is comprised mainly of two things.. hydrogen and ignorance."
John Dobson
Inventor, astronomer and metaphysical thinker.
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Joined: May 18th, 2012, 10:50 pm

June 14th, 2012, 1:07 pm #7

How is the space in the piston measured? From bottom of piston to the skirt of the piston? Thanks
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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

June 14th, 2012, 4:57 pm #8

...(usually the flange of the front guide) to whatever surface supports the back end (usually the flange of the rear guide) at the moment of cocking when the latch engages. I doubt there's any way to measure that dimension exactly without first assembling the components involved, especially considering the difficulty of calculating or measuring the matching datum - the "stacked" length of the fully compressed spring.

That is to say: The best way - maybe the only way - is trial and error: Adding spacing until the gun won't cock, then backing off.

So maybe it's fortunate that, as Russ says, the last 0.1" of compression really doesn't make much difference, anyway.

Steve
Last edited by pneuguy on June 14th, 2012, 5:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 21st, 2000, 9:30 pm

June 14th, 2012, 9:37 pm #9

How is the space in the piston measured? From bottom of piston to the skirt of the piston? Thanks
Most steel pocket 6" rulers work quite handily. Obviously the gun needs to be disassembled to take all the needed measurements. A micrometer or decent caliper is needed as well.

"The Universe is comprised mainly of two things.. hydrogen and ignorance."
John Dobson
Inventor, astronomer and metaphysical thinker.
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Joined: May 18th, 2012, 10:50 pm

June 14th, 2012, 11:22 pm #10

Wrong track or right track - here is my proposal.

Insert the guide in the piston (with no spring) until the base of the guide touches the bottom skirt of the piston. Measure the free space between the two ends through the piston slot. In my case this measurement is 4 7/16 inches. Top 1/4" of the spring will not touch the guide liner as that length is smaller than the available space in the piston. An additional 1/16" of the spring will not touch the guide due to the taper of the guide at the top end. Please excuse if I used the wrong terminology.

I solicit your input.
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