The German Enigma Machine:

The German Enigma Machine:

Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

March 29th, 2012, 1:25 am #1


This was the most secure encoding/decoding device ever devised, and its capture from German U-boats was the top priority among Allied military intelligence teams in WW2.

The machine's encoding method was unlike any other:

When a key was pressed, the letter would be encoded to another letter, but the next time the SAME key was pressed, the encoding would go to a DIFFERENT letter!

The machine's patchboard would further scramble the encoding, requiring Billions of key strokes to come up with the same letter!

In use, the cipher key would first be transmitted, enabling the U-boat captain or the Kriegsmarine officer to know how to set up the patchboard and the code wheel prior to sending a message.

This device hads no electronics whatever. It consisted of a battery, light bulbs for the alphanumeric characters, three code wheels, and a simple patchboard.

Allied code teams tried unsuccessfully for years to break the code, which was finally broken by Polish cryptographers, with the aid of a captured Enigma Machine.

Hal
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Joined: May 27th, 2009, 11:54 pm

March 29th, 2012, 1:36 am #2

have happened to a better bunch.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enigma_machine

out.
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Joined: December 25th, 2010, 4:18 pm

March 29th, 2012, 3:07 am #3



Life , this one and one more . . . . .
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Joined: October 10th, 2003, 5:24 am

March 29th, 2012, 3:44 am #4

This was the most secure encoding/decoding device ever devised, and its capture from German U-boats was the top priority among Allied military intelligence teams in WW2.

The machine's encoding method was unlike any other:

When a key was pressed, the letter would be encoded to another letter, but the next time the SAME key was pressed, the encoding would go to a DIFFERENT letter!

The machine's patchboard would further scramble the encoding, requiring Billions of key strokes to come up with the same letter!

In use, the cipher key would first be transmitted, enabling the U-boat captain or the Kriegsmarine officer to know how to set up the patchboard and the code wheel prior to sending a message.

This device hads no electronics whatever. It consisted of a battery, light bulbs for the alphanumeric characters, three code wheels, and a simple patchboard.

Allied code teams tried unsuccessfully for years to break the code, which was finally broken by Polish cryptographers, with the aid of a captured Enigma Machine.

Hal
We had the Enigma machine and were able to read all of the communications of the German high command, including the details of Operation Sea Lion, yet we still had a devil of a time defeating them. Makes you think, eh?

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Joined: October 21st, 2000, 9:30 pm

March 29th, 2012, 4:23 am #5

This was the most secure encoding/decoding device ever devised, and its capture from German U-boats was the top priority among Allied military intelligence teams in WW2.

The machine's encoding method was unlike any other:

When a key was pressed, the letter would be encoded to another letter, but the next time the SAME key was pressed, the encoding would go to a DIFFERENT letter!

The machine's patchboard would further scramble the encoding, requiring Billions of key strokes to come up with the same letter!

In use, the cipher key would first be transmitted, enabling the U-boat captain or the Kriegsmarine officer to know how to set up the patchboard and the code wheel prior to sending a message.

This device hads no electronics whatever. It consisted of a battery, light bulbs for the alphanumeric characters, three code wheels, and a simple patchboard.

Allied code teams tried unsuccessfully for years to break the code, which was finally broken by Polish cryptographers, with the aid of a captured Enigma Machine.

Hal
Of a 4th wheel being added at some point.

"The Universe is comprised mainly of two things.. hydrogen and ignorance."
John Dobson
Inventor, astronomer and metaphysical thinker.
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Joined: July 1st, 2004, 3:15 am

March 29th, 2012, 7:07 am #6

This was the most secure encoding/decoding device ever devised, and its capture from German U-boats was the top priority among Allied military intelligence teams in WW2.

The machine's encoding method was unlike any other:

When a key was pressed, the letter would be encoded to another letter, but the next time the SAME key was pressed, the encoding would go to a DIFFERENT letter!

The machine's patchboard would further scramble the encoding, requiring Billions of key strokes to come up with the same letter!

In use, the cipher key would first be transmitted, enabling the U-boat captain or the Kriegsmarine officer to know how to set up the patchboard and the code wheel prior to sending a message.

This device hads no electronics whatever. It consisted of a battery, light bulbs for the alphanumeric characters, three code wheels, and a simple patchboard.

Allied code teams tried unsuccessfully for years to break the code, which was finally broken by Polish cryptographers, with the aid of a captured Enigma Machine.

Hal
but hardly the best ever.. come on now...
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Joined: October 14th, 2003, 4:56 am

March 29th, 2012, 9:10 am #7

Of a 4th wheel being added at some point.

"The Universe is comprised mainly of two things.. hydrogen and ignorance."
John Dobson
Inventor, astronomer and metaphysical thinker.
x
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Joined: October 14th, 2003, 4:56 am

March 29th, 2012, 9:18 am #8

This was the most secure encoding/decoding device ever devised, and its capture from German U-boats was the top priority among Allied military intelligence teams in WW2.

The machine's encoding method was unlike any other:

When a key was pressed, the letter would be encoded to another letter, but the next time the SAME key was pressed, the encoding would go to a DIFFERENT letter!

The machine's patchboard would further scramble the encoding, requiring Billions of key strokes to come up with the same letter!

In use, the cipher key would first be transmitted, enabling the U-boat captain or the Kriegsmarine officer to know how to set up the patchboard and the code wheel prior to sending a message.

This device hads no electronics whatever. It consisted of a battery, light bulbs for the alphanumeric characters, three code wheels, and a simple patchboard.

Allied code teams tried unsuccessfully for years to break the code, which was finally broken by Polish cryptographers, with the aid of a captured Enigma Machine.

Hal
Their Hollerith punch card machines were used in breaking the Enigma code.

Unfortunately, Hollerith machines were also used by the Germans for other things...

http://news.cnet.com/2009-1082-269157.html
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Joined: September 1st, 2001, 6:38 pm

March 29th, 2012, 1:22 pm #9

This was the most secure encoding/decoding device ever devised, and its capture from German U-boats was the top priority among Allied military intelligence teams in WW2.

The machine's encoding method was unlike any other:

When a key was pressed, the letter would be encoded to another letter, but the next time the SAME key was pressed, the encoding would go to a DIFFERENT letter!

The machine's patchboard would further scramble the encoding, requiring Billions of key strokes to come up with the same letter!

In use, the cipher key would first be transmitted, enabling the U-boat captain or the Kriegsmarine officer to know how to set up the patchboard and the code wheel prior to sending a message.

This device hads no electronics whatever. It consisted of a battery, light bulbs for the alphanumeric characters, three code wheels, and a simple patchboard.

Allied code teams tried unsuccessfully for years to break the code, which was finally broken by Polish cryptographers, with the aid of a captured Enigma Machine.

Hal
Fascinating stuff. Ladies with pretty ankles made the best security-leak scanners; what it meant to be "Coventry-ized"; and, war mostly stinks.


Happy Shooting!

Ed, The Airgun Tune-Meister


"We can rebuild the squirrel. Make him stronger, faster...We have the technology"---Skyler M.
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

March 29th, 2012, 2:54 pm #10

We had the Enigma machine and were able to read all of the communications of the German high command, including the details of Operation Sea Lion, yet we still had a devil of a time defeating them. Makes you think, eh?
Hal
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