Surprising discovery...

Surprising discovery...

Joined: August 20th, 2006, 5:36 am

May 21st, 2012, 5:32 pm #1

And I'm not talking about the Crosman PCP . Was working on my QB yesterday, and had planned to do some work on lightening up the hammer. Decided to start by cutting off the extension on the back end, so I chucked it up in my lathe and went at it with a parting tool. Barely scratched the surface! Checked it out with a file, looks like it's hardened steel, or at least, case hardened. Is this typical, or is mine an odd ball? Looks like my only options are grinding, or saving the stock hammer as a template, and turning my own, although I think I'll stick with steel instead of brass. Later.

Dave
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Joined: September 21st, 2007, 12:13 pm

May 21st, 2012, 6:53 pm #2

are hardened, along with the Crosmans, and Sheridans.
The method that I use to lighten any of the strikers is to chuck them in the lathe and bore the I.D. using a U.S. made center cutting carbide end mill. After reducing to the desired weight I turn a Delrin insert to bring the I.D and depth back to OEM
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Joined: April 28th, 2008, 6:45 am

May 21st, 2012, 7:02 pm #3

And I'm not talking about the Crosman PCP . Was working on my QB yesterday, and had planned to do some work on lightening up the hammer. Decided to start by cutting off the extension on the back end, so I chucked it up in my lathe and went at it with a parting tool. Barely scratched the surface! Checked it out with a file, looks like it's hardened steel, or at least, case hardened. Is this typical, or is mine an odd ball? Looks like my only options are grinding, or saving the stock hammer as a template, and turning my own, although I think I'll stick with steel instead of brass. Later.

Dave
Have tinkered with qb strikers a little...top is stock, second down came out of a "parts" rifle, I made the bottom two from 1045, hardened the last one and am using it now.

[/IMG]

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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 12:14 am

May 21st, 2012, 8:45 pm #4

Grinds just fine
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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

May 21st, 2012, 9:42 pm #5

And I'm not talking about the Crosman PCP . Was working on my QB yesterday, and had planned to do some work on lightening up the hammer. Decided to start by cutting off the extension on the back end, so I chucked it up in my lathe and went at it with a parting tool. Barely scratched the surface! Checked it out with a file, looks like it's hardened steel, or at least, case hardened. Is this typical, or is mine an odd ball? Looks like my only options are grinding, or saving the stock hammer as a template, and turning my own, although I think I'll stick with steel instead of brass. Later.

Dave
..lathe it...then reharden it or get TC bits.

Found I could cut the surface hardening with a TC bit, switch to a high speed bit after the outer layer was lathed off. As you don't lathe off the impact face or the sear engagement, don't have to reharden.

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Joined: March 28th, 2002, 6:54 pm

May 22nd, 2012, 4:45 am #6

And I'm not talking about the Crosman PCP . Was working on my QB yesterday, and had planned to do some work on lightening up the hammer. Decided to start by cutting off the extension on the back end, so I chucked it up in my lathe and went at it with a parting tool. Barely scratched the surface! Checked it out with a file, looks like it's hardened steel, or at least, case hardened. Is this typical, or is mine an odd ball? Looks like my only options are grinding, or saving the stock hammer as a template, and turning my own, although I think I'll stick with steel instead of brass. Later.

Dave
I use grinders on the outside and cobalt drills and/or carbide mills on the inside. I don't bother to sleeve them....just put a top hat guide in the front.
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Joined: August 20th, 2006, 5:36 am

May 22nd, 2012, 4:24 pm #7

And I'm not talking about the Crosman PCP . Was working on my QB yesterday, and had planned to do some work on lightening up the hammer. Decided to start by cutting off the extension on the back end, so I chucked it up in my lathe and went at it with a parting tool. Barely scratched the surface! Checked it out with a file, looks like it's hardened steel, or at least, case hardened. Is this typical, or is mine an odd ball? Looks like my only options are grinding, or saving the stock hammer as a template, and turning my own, although I think I'll stick with steel instead of brass. Later.

Dave
So does it really NEED to be hardened, or can I get away with using something like 4130 and skip the heat treat? Seems like it would take a lot of hammering of that valve stem to cause much more than dimpling, or is the heat treat intended more for a bearing surface treatment? Thanks, guys, seems the more I learn about these QB's, the more there is to learn . Later.

Dave
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Joined: September 21st, 2007, 12:13 pm

May 22nd, 2012, 5:05 pm #8

And I'm not talking about the Crosman PCP . Was working on my QB yesterday, and had planned to do some work on lightening up the hammer. Decided to start by cutting off the extension on the back end, so I chucked it up in my lathe and went at it with a parting tool. Barely scratched the surface! Checked it out with a file, looks like it's hardened steel, or at least, case hardened. Is this typical, or is mine an odd ball? Looks like my only options are grinding, or saving the stock hammer as a template, and turning my own, although I think I'll stick with steel instead of brass. Later.

Dave
that the hardening is aimed more in the direction of keeping the sear engagement part of the striker consistent to avoid unwanted accidental discharges, rather than the stem pin wearing the face.
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 12:14 am

May 22nd, 2012, 6:20 pm #9

So does it really NEED to be hardened, or can I get away with using something like 4130 and skip the heat treat? Seems like it would take a lot of hammering of that valve stem to cause much more than dimpling, or is the heat treat intended more for a bearing surface treatment? Thanks, guys, seems the more I learn about these QB's, the more there is to learn . Later.

Dave
Hard on hard would be ideal, soft steel on steel without lubrication often feels grabby.

The tube might pick up a bit of work hardness in the forming process, (not much).

Consistent hammer strikes would do well with hardened rubbing surfaces. The striker catch and striking surface can only benefit from being hard on the surface. I think the "Industry Brand" did a good job on that striker!

Dis similar metals like brass would be a good choice for replacement strikers. (heavy) or buttons, or dri slide, dry moly lubes etc.
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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

May 22nd, 2012, 11:56 pm #10

And I'm not talking about the Crosman PCP . Was working on my QB yesterday, and had planned to do some work on lightening up the hammer. Decided to start by cutting off the extension on the back end, so I chucked it up in my lathe and went at it with a parting tool. Barely scratched the surface! Checked it out with a file, looks like it's hardened steel, or at least, case hardened. Is this typical, or is mine an odd ball? Looks like my only options are grinding, or saving the stock hammer as a template, and turning my own, although I think I'll stick with steel instead of brass. Later.

Dave
I just lathe the centrap body and the BACK of the "head", which leaves the contact points (including the sear bearing area) surface hardened. May not be as light as you want to go, but is enough lighter to really notice the difference.
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