South Bend lathe any good?

South Bend lathe any good?

Joined: September 13th, 2005, 8:22 pm

March 18th, 2007, 1:32 pm #1

Hi guys, I have a chance to buy a South Bend lathe 9" but with a 28" opening. It comes with some tools. I know nothing about lathes or how to use them. Would this be a good place to start? It is considered a table top model. It is local and the price is $500. Good deal or not?

Thanks in advance,
Bob in WV

Never get in a hurry, it only slows you down.
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Joined: May 12th, 2005, 1:57 am

March 18th, 2007, 2:08 pm #2

asking is a southbend lathe is good is like asking if a mercedes is a good car. It goes without saying. If the lathe is in good condition and the ways are not all work or beat up it should be a very good lathe. For 500 dollars I don't see how you could go too far wrong. I am sure it will probably take some setup time and possibly some fiddling with it to get it all working as nice as It should but you will have a classic lathe that is better than about anything you might buy today especially in that price range. Maybe you could post some pics so we all can see what it looks like. Someone on here might already have the same lathe and could tell you everything you want to know about it....



Pete Matos
865-363-9218
matospeter@bellsouth.net
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Joined: May 8th, 2001, 4:06 pm

March 18th, 2007, 5:03 pm #3

Hi guys, I have a chance to buy a South Bend lathe 9" but with a 28" opening. It comes with some tools. I know nothing about lathes or how to use them. Would this be a good place to start? It is considered a table top model. It is local and the price is $500. Good deal or not?

Thanks in advance,
Bob in WV

Never get in a hurry, it only slows you down.
One thing to check,is the paint original? If it is, and the paint is in good shape, then its a pretty good sign the machine is not a junker. You have to expect the paint to be worn off on the headstock where the operator leans his arm, and wherever someone can set something down on the machine, but more than that and it could be an indicator of lots of use. If someone painted it, then you have to do some more checking. But for that price, and you know you don't have to offer full price, I'm with Pete, hard to go too far wrong. If it runs, you are probably ok.

One thing about old lathes, is that they often come with lots of tooling. Thats valuable to other people with that same machine, and you might be able to sell off some of it to offset the cost of the machine.

I'm concerned about you having never run a lathe before, you can get frustrated with these old machines. Best if you have some support from someone who knows a little to help thru those rough spots. There is a southbend group on Yahoo.
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Joined: September 13th, 2005, 8:22 pm

March 19th, 2007, 12:26 am #4

Hi guys, I have a chance to buy a South Bend lathe 9" but with a 28" opening. It comes with some tools. I know nothing about lathes or how to use them. Would this be a good place to start? It is considered a table top model. It is local and the price is $500. Good deal or not?

Thanks in advance,
Bob in WV

Never get in a hurry, it only slows you down.
Thanks for the info. I haven't even seen it yet. So far all I have done is talk to the guy on the phone. I will keep your advice in mind when I go to see it.

Bob in WV



Never get in a hurry, it only slows you down.
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Joined: January 7th, 2007, 1:03 am

March 19th, 2007, 5:22 pm #5

Hi guys, I have a chance to buy a South Bend lathe 9" but with a 28" opening. It comes with some tools. I know nothing about lathes or how to use them. Would this be a good place to start? It is considered a table top model. It is local and the price is $500. Good deal or not?

Thanks in advance,
Bob in WV

Never get in a hurry, it only slows you down.
see if you can measure any backlash in the leadscrews. Most machines screws wear over time adding to the backash but South Bends are quality machines. They have many still in use from WWII. For $500 it sounds like it might be a steal of a deal but I would have to see it 1st of course.


Dee

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Walther P22 combo barrels w/Pentax Reflex Red Dot sight
Steyr M9 9mm w/Steyr Trapezoid open sights
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Joined: July 9th, 2003, 7:23 am

March 20th, 2007, 3:36 am #6

One thing to check,is the paint original? If it is, and the paint is in good shape, then its a pretty good sign the machine is not a junker. You have to expect the paint to be worn off on the headstock where the operator leans his arm, and wherever someone can set something down on the machine, but more than that and it could be an indicator of lots of use. If someone painted it, then you have to do some more checking. But for that price, and you know you don't have to offer full price, I'm with Pete, hard to go too far wrong. If it runs, you are probably ok.

One thing about old lathes, is that they often come with lots of tooling. Thats valuable to other people with that same machine, and you might be able to sell off some of it to offset the cost of the machine.

I'm concerned about you having never run a lathe before, you can get frustrated with these old machines. Best if you have some support from someone who knows a little to help thru those rough spots. There is a southbend group on Yahoo.
The S.B. lathes are solid machines and easy to find. The beds wear by the headstock, easy to see as there will be a ridge on the carrage way. If it has a ridge then there is wear, if no ridge then its a low use lathe.
The beds that have ridges on top of the front "V" way were used & not lubricated properly. Also the flat belts werent the best drive system as they can slip easily.
The later years some of the beds were flame hardened and if they were will be so marked, usually on the 10 inch models. South Bend lathes were made in England, France, Korea & Sweeden for years.
I had a new 10 inch "A" model that had the hard bed & was made in Korea.
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