Shooting at high and low targets.

Shooting at high and low targets.

Joined: December 13th, 2007, 1:01 am

August 29th, 2012, 1:59 am #1

How do you adjust the aimpoint to compensate for high and low targets?
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Joined: August 14th, 2004, 2:44 am

August 29th, 2012, 2:20 am #2

you don't compensate. The rules from the firearms world don't translate well to the airgun world.... not enough time of flight/distance.

Now stand by while everyone tells you to hold under.

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Joined: May 31st, 2011, 9:43 pm

August 29th, 2012, 2:29 am #3

away and 15 yards up. The idea as I've heard it is, that the target would range at around 35 - 40 yards, but you would range at the base of the tree and use that distance for your clicking or holdover.

Now the wizards will tell you the real facts:-)

Wayne
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Joined: September 7th, 2001, 3:52 am

August 29th, 2012, 4:24 am #4

Shoot the horizontal distance to the target. However the firing dynamics and point of impact of an airgun changes with how it's held, which might also affect where you aim (especially on steep angles and most especially with recoilling springers). Don't ask me to explain those intracies, 'cause I'm allergic to puzzles!
Last edited by compressive on August 29th, 2012, 4:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
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lhd
Joined: January 9th, 2002, 2:30 am

August 29th, 2012, 5:13 am #5

away and 15 yards up. The idea as I've heard it is, that the target would range at around 35 - 40 yards, but you would range at the base of the tree and use that distance for your clicking or holdover.

Now the wizards will tell you the real facts:-)

Wayne
Many facts, unless they are in riddle form. Even then, not for free.
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Joined: July 24th, 2010, 1:44 am

August 29th, 2012, 11:54 am #6

How do you adjust the aimpoint to compensate for high and low targets?
is a pretty complicated combination of distance (pellet trajectory), zero distance, and shooting angle.

When a 30 yard zero is used with a 14fpe CPL the pellet (all I know) is actually flying from the bore about 1 1/2" below the line of sight (or whatever), it rises about 1/8" above the line of sight at mid range, then fall down to the zero point due to gravity. If the shot were taken with the barrel vertical, gravity has little to do with the pellet trajectory. The pellet crosses the line of sight 1 1/2" above the bore, however the pellet doesn't get "pulled down" by gravity and it continues "on a straight path". This is complicated by the fact that the "gravity induced trajectory" becomes greater the shooting angle becomes "more horizontal". The same process applies to down hill shots.

With actual tree squirrel hunting using CPLs in a 14fpe R9 and a 30 yard zero I've actually had shooting angle/distance combinations where I was aiming "point blank" on a squirrel at 40 yards and hit the exact spot aimed at. For a while my brother took a rangefinder on a squirrel hunt and found it pretty useless for steep angled shots because the ole "measure the tree trunk distance and use that holdover" didn't work very well for the loopy flight of a pellet.

To get a handle on how low to aim at "steep angled squirrels" my brother and I put in hours hiking through the woods (when I lived in WV), picking out back lit steep angled leaves or small pine cones at random, then see who could hit the target first. Really good practice for getting a handle on how low to aim, however those shooting angles were MUCH greater than those at the FT club I attend. At Difta we usually have a "target on a tree" or two, but I haven't noticed that they're at a enough of an "angle x distance" to need much compensation since the KXs aren't really tiny. Perhaps they're an issue for the "road kill position" shooters but I haven't had much of an issue with them sitting on a bucket using cross sticks.
Last edited by nced1 on August 29th, 2012, 12:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 19th, 2005, 12:48 am

August 29th, 2012, 12:22 pm #7

away and 15 yards up. The idea as I've heard it is, that the target would range at around 35 - 40 yards, but you would range at the base of the tree and use that distance for your clicking or holdover.

Now the wizards will tell you the real facts:-)

Wayne
Like the shot on the lower forty at Ross's place would you still judge the distance from the base of the tree????
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Joined: March 8th, 2009, 4:24 pm

August 29th, 2012, 12:31 pm #8

Shoot the horizontal distance to the target. However the firing dynamics and point of impact of an airgun changes with how it's held, which might also affect where you aim (especially on steep angles and most especially with recoilling springers). Don't ask me to explain those intracies, 'cause I'm allergic to puzzles!
and i do know that my springer recoil causes it to dive, but i end up hitting way high so have to aim about 14" below the kill zone. strange.
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Joined: March 8th, 2009, 4:24 pm

August 29th, 2012, 12:34 pm #9

Like the shot on the lower forty at Ross's place would you still judge the distance from the base of the tree????
of the angle in order to know the equivalent of a distance to the base. Having said that it still won't translate well to air guns. I have just gotten in the habit of aiming at the bottom edge of the kill zone.
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Joined: October 27th, 2010, 4:43 am

August 29th, 2012, 2:59 pm #10

I use the bottom or top of kill zone ,depending the angle and distance. Also like Ed says practice, that way you know where your gun's poi.
And like Biker said ,it is going to open a can of worms,,we all have different styles (ways) of shooting.
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