Seeing it is the slow season for many FT clubs .............

Seeing it is the slow season for many FT clubs .............

Joined: June 8th, 2014, 9:45 pm

January 11th, 2017, 6:19 pm #1

I would like to propose a question that I don't recall being asked before or have missed it if it has. When a important competition takes place like a GP or National, the shooting order for each squad is always that the Hunter class always is requested to shoot first. Does anyone know the motivation for this order? Just something I've always wondered and can't seem to make any sense of it. Years back when I use to play the Bowhuner 3D game we always rotated the squad shooters at each lane so the same shooter wouldn't have to go first on every lane. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with that but just wondering why the Hunter class always is requested to shoot first?
Last edited by dayjd2 on January 11th, 2017, 6:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 22nd, 2012, 7:35 pm

January 11th, 2017, 6:25 pm #2

Hunter has 12x limitation while wft doesn't. And if you are in hunter you can typically take advantage of the markings on WFT scopes to see where they are shooting.
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Joined: April 4th, 2015, 7:52 pm

January 11th, 2017, 6:36 pm #3

I would like to propose a question that I don't recall being asked before or have missed it if it has. When a important competition takes place like a GP or National, the shooting order for each squad is always that the Hunter class always is requested to shoot first. Does anyone know the motivation for this order? Just something I've always wondered and can't seem to make any sense of it. Years back when I use to play the Bowhuner 3D game we always rotated the squad shooters at each lane so the same shooter wouldn't have to go first on every lane. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with that but just wondering why the Hunter class always is requested to shoot first?
Bill,

The reason that certain classes are slated to go first or last lies upon the ranging. Meaning that if an Open shooter or a WFTF shooter (PCP or Springer) are allowed to go first, there might be some inclination for unscrupulous individuals to "peek" at the better ranging capabilities of the above mentioned classes. This is why Hunter class is always first.

Tom Holland
Assistant Match Director
Eastern Suffolk Competitive Airgunners Association
( ESCAA)
Long Island NY
Last edited by xbowsniper on January 11th, 2017, 6:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 2012, 11:50 pm

January 11th, 2017, 6:37 pm #4

I would like to propose a question that I don't recall being asked before or have missed it if it has. When a important competition takes place like a GP or National, the shooting order for each squad is always that the Hunter class always is requested to shoot first. Does anyone know the motivation for this order? Just something I've always wondered and can't seem to make any sense of it. Years back when I use to play the Bowhuner 3D game we always rotated the squad shooters at each lane so the same shooter wouldn't have to go first on every lane. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with that but just wondering why the Hunter class always is requested to shoot first?
I suspect it's to prevent a Hunter Division shooter from gleaning any information by reading a squad mates high power scope wheel.

If so, it's an insulting way to determine order. That said, I don't mind going first, whether shooting Hunter or not.
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Joined: June 8th, 2014, 9:45 pm

January 11th, 2017, 7:15 pm #5

Hunter has 12x limitation while wft doesn't. And if you are in hunter you can typically take advantage of the markings on WFT scopes to see where they are shooting.
many Hunter setups include a 5" or 6" objective wheel. Is it ok for the WFTF or Open shooters to see what the Hunter shooter dials in or is it just natural for hunter shooters to push the envelope? Of course most shooters know that the Hunter shooter can't objectively dial in a good number on 12x over 40 yards so why bother. LOL!
Last edited by dayjd2 on January 11th, 2017, 10:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 8th, 2014, 9:45 pm

January 11th, 2017, 7:21 pm #6

Bill,

The reason that certain classes are slated to go first or last lies upon the ranging. Meaning that if an Open shooter or a WFTF shooter (PCP or Springer) are allowed to go first, there might be some inclination for unscrupulous individuals to "peek" at the better ranging capabilities of the above mentioned classes. This is why Hunter class is always first.

Tom Holland
Assistant Match Director
Eastern Suffolk Competitive Airgunners Association
( ESCAA)
Long Island NY
But if you have a three man squad with one hunter shooter going first what is preventing the other two from peeking at each other. Of course only the shooter that shoots last would have the "peeker" advantage available to them.
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Joined: April 28th, 2012, 10:47 pm

January 11th, 2017, 7:24 pm #7

I would like to propose a question that I don't recall being asked before or have missed it if it has. When a important competition takes place like a GP or National, the shooting order for each squad is always that the Hunter class always is requested to shoot first. Does anyone know the motivation for this order? Just something I've always wondered and can't seem to make any sense of it. Years back when I use to play the Bowhuner 3D game we always rotated the squad shooters at each lane so the same shooter wouldn't have to go first on every lane. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with that but just wondering why the Hunter class always is requested to shoot first?
What I personally like to do when squad mates open minded ... 2 man squads only
Is play the round doing LEAP FROG ( What i call it anyways )

Match starts and someone shoots first ( Don't matter who )
Then the second in squad shoots as is typical ... But
Starts the next lane basically creating a situation where the shooter once in his MOJO gets to shoot 2 lanes in sequence.

Being the squad mate shoots second after this ... he now go's first on the next lane getting his 2 lanes in a row got my MOJO rollin too chance.

The entire match squad mates do this jump until match is finished.


No one is alway under pressure of shooting first the whole match, BOTH get longer rest between shooting each lane.

Always felt the Ying / Yang evened out the mental advantage / disadvantage of the game.

Done this at Club and GP matches time to time and never heard of if being against any AAFTA rules.

Scott S
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Joined: June 8th, 2014, 9:45 pm

January 11th, 2017, 7:35 pm #8

I suspect it's to prevent a Hunter Division shooter from gleaning any information by reading a squad mates high power scope wheel.

If so, it's an insulting way to determine order. That said, I don't mind going first, whether shooting Hunter or not.
But it seems if we rotated the hunter shooter(s) might not feel like we are shooting first because others think we might cheat. It isn't exactly good shooter etiquette to be standing close enough to see the opponents wheel anyway.
Last edited by dayjd2 on January 11th, 2017, 10:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 8th, 2014, 9:45 pm

January 11th, 2017, 10:52 pm #9

What I personally like to do when squad mates open minded ... 2 man squads only
Is play the round doing LEAP FROG ( What i call it anyways )

Match starts and someone shoots first ( Don't matter who )
Then the second in squad shoots as is typical ... But
Starts the next lane basically creating a situation where the shooter once in his MOJO gets to shoot 2 lanes in sequence.

Being the squad mate shoots second after this ... he now go's first on the next lane getting his 2 lanes in a row got my MOJO rollin too chance.

The entire match squad mates do this jump until match is finished.


No one is alway under pressure of shooting first the whole match, BOTH get longer rest between shooting each lane.

Always felt the Ying / Yang evened out the mental advantage / disadvantage of the game.

Done this at Club and GP matches time to time and never heard of if being against any AAFTA rules.

Scott S
Duh! When I have gone first on occasion I have shot the wrong targets first and lost 4 points very quickly. I have also witnessed other shooters do the same thing. One shooter who has won several Nationals lost two Nationals by doing a similar stunt. The last time was last fall in paw paw which he shot kneeling targets sitting on his bucket. I didn't witness that time but word got around. So unless you stay real focused and on top of your game going first can put a hurt on you. I'm thinking wftf and open shooters already know this so that's why they don't go first. ;>)
Last edited by dayjd2 on January 11th, 2017, 11:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 27th, 2010, 9:48 pm

January 12th, 2017, 1:01 am #10

And usually have nothing to do with shooting order. I think I can speak for everyone in saying we have all had them. Whether it's forgetting to dial your turret for a shot, getting out a revolution on your elevation, or shooting a target out of order. I've done all three of the above, only the first two are unique to open/wftf. But in all instances, it didn't matter what order I was shooting in. I just lost my concentration, simple as that.

To say that someone lost shots because they went first is an excuse for not paying attention/concentrating...simple as that.
Has nothing to do with class, experience level, shooting ability. It all comes down to being focused and in the moment.


I don't really mind going first in any instance. The only real disadvantage it poses is that on a course where there is some walking involved, you may come to the next lane and have to take a few seconds to calm the heart rate. Then again, you can always walk your stuff down to the next lane after you shoot and go back to score your fellow squad mates, that way you save some physical stress right before you shoot.
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