Resumes

Resumes

Joined: October 14th, 2003, 4:56 am

April 7th, 2012, 3:26 am #1

My company's hiring a few people and I'm going through hundreds of resumes.

I don't understand why people think that writing things like "self starter, team player, detail oriented, fast learner" would make them stand out.

Another thing is "references upon request." I never request them, and if given I never check them. Is anyone going to put someone down as a reference who'll give me a BAD report?

When I get a five page resume that reads like a super-hero novel, It usually goes into the round file by page two. If you're 47, I don't need to know that you were captain of your water polo team in high school.

I don't like bold, (other than headers), underline, italics, fancy fonts, funky watermarks, borders, more than one color print or exclamation points.

I like a high quality paper, but recently got one on card stock (Maybe he thought my shreader couldn't handle thick paper).

One thing I've been seeing recently is a small picture of the applicant on the front page. Some think it's tacky. I think it's a great; I can pick up a resume I've filed for a possible 2nd interview and immediately tie it to the person. I hope it becomes a standard thing.
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Joined: February 24th, 2006, 6:15 pm

April 7th, 2012, 3:33 pm #2

I'm sure a lot of people could benefit if you would expound some more on how a good resume should be written. An example would really help.

Thanks,
Ejwills.

Sometimes silence is golden,sometimes it's not.
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Joined: July 3rd, 2010, 9:15 pm

April 7th, 2012, 10:09 pm #3

I am a headhunter. Been doing it almost 20 years, now. I [re] write peoples' CVs all the time.
I have particular prejudices, and very personal opinions on the subject of CV's, [and i dont care if you agree with them].
I am dedicated in recruiting in a very small niche of a certain skill set, in a very particular profession.
[I seldom use unsolicited CVs. If I want your CV to present to a client, I will research you and contact you and ask for it].
Cvs dont get you a job. If they work, they get you an interview for a job.

I tailor CVs to my clients prejudices. My clients are very senior, very busy and quickly annoyed by time wasters and irrelevant BS.
All the CVs i submit, i edit down to one page. Page and half tops. Anything longer creates the immediate impression without reading it that
the person is too old, [too long a career] a job hopper, or the CV is laden w/ fluff. like the nonsense cliches quoted in the 1st post.
I gut that stuff completely. Sometimes a one paragraph/ half page cover letter written by the candidate, if especially salient or well written will also be included.
The formatting is very plain. Personal particulars are bare bones. As are degrees earned or other professional qualifications. Just the facts, no embellishments.
Jobs are listed in reverse order. latest listed first. dates of service, Company, location, corporate title and functional title.
w/ each A VERY brief description of day to day activities, client/industry sector coverage & and product specialties, and little else.

I believe in and use the CV as a come-on, a sales tool/ teaser designed to secure the 1st interview. Not the job.
My strategy is to create the idea in the potential employer "oh i have to meet this guy, he looks very qualified, but i want to know more about him".
The interview is when a candidate gets to establish a personal rapport [in the 1st 90 seconds of the interview or FAIL] and tell his life story.
[Because you have created an interest in the person doing the interview, to know more].
Busy folks never get to page 2 anyway, except as a fast scan, & in the jobs i fill, nobody has time or interest in 20 yrs prior high school hobbies/heroics.
I only include pictures if the photos show a very good looking person. Otherwise they are a negative.

If I flood the client with 5 pages of irrelevant detail, first of all he's annoyed having to wade through the fluff and worse may think he
doesn't need to meet the person, because he already knows all he needs to know. and Nobody gets hired without an interview.

Establish a real personal rapport in the first 90 seconds of the interview and you will get all the time you need to tell your fascinating life story or impress with your wit & wisdom.
Fail to do that and the interview seldom lasts more than half hour. Less qualified candidates [on paper] are often hired as first choice on the basis
of a having established a good personal rapport in the 1st 90 seconds of the interview, overcoming many deal-breaker type experiential shortcomings,
on the basis of personality alone. [REAL People Skills]. Fail to establish that rapport, and no matter how technically qualified you are, you will never be 1st choice.
And i do check the references, very carefully, of any successful candidate, after they have accepted any offer. Occasionally that blows them up. Better them than me.

PS, Ladies, before you start nit pickin', Curricula Vitae or perhaps more correctly, Curricula Vitarum is the correct plural form of Curriculum Vitae
Last edited by buzzardslunch on April 7th, 2012, 11:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 21st, 2008, 6:29 am

April 8th, 2012, 12:06 pm #4

I may need your input.

A recruitment agency saw my resume(CV) in a job portal, and called me, told me that he saw me fit for his recruitment search, and he submitted my resume to his client (employer) for shortlisting, for the employer to decide.

The employer did and now, I am called for the final interview.

My question: I am selected for a position which I do not possess previous experience. Should I ask them why they selected me?

How will I answer the employer if he asks me what makes me fit the position?

I have a feeling that this is going to be an awkward interview. And the appointment is set on Wednesday next week.
Last edited by steeldreams007 on April 8th, 2012, 12:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: February 24th, 2006, 6:15 pm

April 8th, 2012, 4:31 pm #5

My company's hiring a few people and I'm going through hundreds of resumes.

I don't understand why people think that writing things like "self starter, team player, detail oriented, fast learner" would make them stand out.

Another thing is "references upon request." I never request them, and if given I never check them. Is anyone going to put someone down as a reference who'll give me a BAD report?

When I get a five page resume that reads like a super-hero novel, It usually goes into the round file by page two. If you're 47, I don't need to know that you were captain of your water polo team in high school.

I don't like bold, (other than headers), underline, italics, fancy fonts, funky watermarks, borders, more than one color print or exclamation points.

I like a high quality paper, but recently got one on card stock (Maybe he thought my shreader couldn't handle thick paper).

One thing I've been seeing recently is a small picture of the applicant on the front page. Some think it's tacky. I think it's a great; I can pick up a resume I've filed for a possible 2nd interview and immediately tie it to the person. I hope it becomes a standard thing.
I think this subject matter can be very important to a lot of people.
Any and all comments and help is appreciated and will go a long way to inlighten job seekers
who sometimes have no clue or limited knowledge as to how to pursue a potential job or position.


Sometimes silence is golden,sometimes it's not.
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Joined: July 3rd, 2010, 9:15 pm

April 8th, 2012, 10:21 pm #6

I may need your input.

A recruitment agency saw my resume(CV) in a job portal, and called me, told me that he saw me fit for his recruitment search, and he submitted my resume to his client (employer) for shortlisting, for the employer to decide.

The employer did and now, I am called for the final interview.

My question: I am selected for a position which I do not possess previous experience. Should I ask them why they selected me?

How will I answer the employer if he asks me what makes me fit the position?

I have a feeling that this is going to be an awkward interview. And the appointment is set on Wednesday next week.
Its hard to guess the answers without knowing more particulars of your skills and the jobs requirements.
Recruiters have a vested interest in somebody getting hired, [often no cure no pay] and the more expensive the candidate, the better.
I even strategize the order in which i let clients interview good candidates. I usually throw in a couple of real promising on paper disappointments before i show the good stuff.
The good candidates are better appreciated that way. I often throw in a straw horse that they would really like to get, but cant hope to close,
either because employer is too cheap or their company is too crap...because it gives them confidence in me, and helps rationalize their decision toward
someone competent but less demanding of the employer.

Recruiters that get paid, irrespective anybody getting hired are even worse.
They often will submit a range of CVs from over to under-qualified. The recruiter may have several qualified people, including his most favorite and best qualified candidate
and wants to fill out the casting call with chaff [nothing personal] to make sure the client thinks he's getting his money's worth, and to make the qualified stand out better.
Its like a casting cattle call where the casting director knows there are only 3 people out of the multitudes called up that are qualified, have any real chance.
But the client isnt happy if he only sees 3 qualified people... [he wants to see all the girls undressed, whether he's gonna hire them or not.]
I wonder if your recruiter fits this category. Ask him if he is 'on retainer' or 'on contingency'. It tells you a lot about how serious the employer is, how urgent the hire.
I am already suspect of a headhunter who is trolling resume sites. That is not what i call legitimate market research.
The best candidates invariably are sitting in similar jobs, usually at the most successful competitor's shops, and they are not looking for work.
They have to be courted and flattered just to come out for an interview. They are at the top of their niche, generally recognized as such and well known.
Headhunters are paid to hunt those guys, and persuade them to move, not troll the jobs wanted ads.
That is where headhunters really add value. You get the job filled and screw your biggest competitor at the same time. Zero sum win. Makes my fees more palatable.
Everybody on the job portals is out of work, or disgruntled and looking. No zero sum win.

Under-qualified people can overcome skill set & lack of experience defects with good interpersonal skills in the interview.
Inexperienced people with the right skills and background have a BIG advantage in that they are MUCH CHEAPER than experienced ones.
Entry level is the cheapest, & juniors are more pliable, easier to indoctrinate, less of a loss if they don't work out, or leave.

If the interview is going well, and you have some personal rapport, you might ask [why me?]
Or if its going really badly, and they are essentially wasting your time and theirs, what could it hurt?
the middle ground is harder to call...
If they ask you why you think you fit, tell them you are not sure that you do, [but the company has such a great name you couldn't pass up the chance]
and the headhunter ignored your disclaimers and insisted you interview, and blame it all on him. [Totally Fair, and often a great way to build rapport,
as most clients think Headhunters are worse SCUM than lawyers, and trashing them is good sport].
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Joined: November 21st, 2008, 6:29 am

April 8th, 2012, 10:39 pm #7

and personal interview with the direct principal and employer. It is a good guess that it will be a Go - No Go stage.

I think you are right on the skill set and background. Let me add, perhaps potential. I will be zeroed for the rapport then, no mildot correction on that one. Wish me luck on this one, it came up of the blue really.

Thanks for the tips.
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Joined: July 3rd, 2010, 9:15 pm

April 8th, 2012, 10:59 pm #8

Headhunter screening doesn't count as a job interview. He was just covering his ***, that you don't have face tattoos & and a nose piercing.
And a job interview doesnt mean you will get an offer.
If you do well, it is the first interview. If they bring other employees to meet you, during the 1st interview, it is a very good sign.

Depending on the seniority or importance of the job, and the size of the company [unless its a mom & pop or a base entry level position],
it is very unlikely that a single person interviewing can [or will want the sole responsibility] to make the call.

Good Luck any way!
Last edited by buzzardslunch on April 8th, 2012, 11:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 21st, 2008, 6:29 am

April 8th, 2012, 11:40 pm #9

I will find that out by Wednesday soon.

I will give it a good shot then, taking your tips and hints. Thanks.
Last edited by steeldreams007 on April 8th, 2012, 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 3rd, 2010, 9:15 pm

April 9th, 2012, 12:15 am #10

These folks have been interviewing to fill the position for a while. Especially if it is a mom & pop they have tried to fill the position w/out paying recruiters to help.
Sometimes they are miffed by how much $ folks they weren't much impressed w/ been asking for pay, before they seek recruiters help.

Often somebody's boss says "Surely some bright kid can do that job, and a heck of a lot cheaper!"
And this observation may or may not be true.
And sometimes good kids get setup to fail cause they cant handle, and sometimes they make the stretch and score, &/or get taken advantage of.
And sometimes recruiters send kids in to prove to the boss he IS gonna have to pay that much, or pay peanuts expect monkeys.

i got no idea of course, just wild speculation as you gave me zilch detail...
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