Recommendation to fix your Shoebox: You ... and "Tom"

Recommendation to fix your Shoebox: You ... and "Tom"

Joined: November 13th, 2008, 7:09 am

August 9th, 2012, 6:14 pm #1

I own an older 4500 psi Shoebox compressor (#251) that I had to "stand in line" for months to purchase when they first started taking orders for them. Just last week it began showing signs of advancing age (or so I thought) with its automatic shutoff point dropping down to around 3500 psi. I emailed the Shoeboxcompressor.com tech support address asking for details about how to ship the unit to them for repairs, and "Tom" emailed me back the same day, doing everything he could (politely) to talk me out of that. He first pointed me to the really wonderful how-to videos on their Support page, which I watched several times. I am not very mechanically savvy at all, but I gathered up the courage to rebuild one of the cylinders in my unit using some o-rings that came with it, and when that did not do the job (symptoms did not change) Tom patiently talked me thru adjusting the spring that works the shutoff switch--an easy job involving one little grub screw and moving a collar about a quarter of an inch out to the very end of the piston rod (the max adjustment). Immediately after this the compressor regained the ability to go to 4000 psi before shutting off. Tom's final diagnosis: A defective (weak) spring, a replacement for which is now being shipped to me. The cost to me for all this hand-holding (via multiple emails) and one (1) replacement spring: No charge!

What more can I say? I love the fact that my Shoebox was invented in the USA, is American made, and is supported by people who would rather help me fix things myself than profit from doing simple repairs at the factory with me footing the bill for both labor and (due to heavy weight) big shipping charges both ways. I just wanted to share this recent experience of mine with anyone out there who might be thinking of buying a Shoebox but is fearful of maintaining it. I'm a target shooter and a lover but not at all a mechanic; and yet I now think that I can probably handle any future maintenance needs that my Shoebox may develop, and I believe that if I can do it, most of my fellow airgunners can too.
Quote
Share

Joined: September 12th, 2010, 8:18 pm

August 9th, 2012, 6:45 pm #2

Now that's how a customer should be treated! Sounds like a great product and they'll
be in business a long time with that kind of support!
Quote
Share

Joined: April 30th, 2011, 1:41 am

August 9th, 2012, 9:07 pm #3

I own an older 4500 psi Shoebox compressor (#251) that I had to "stand in line" for months to purchase when they first started taking orders for them. Just last week it began showing signs of advancing age (or so I thought) with its automatic shutoff point dropping down to around 3500 psi. I emailed the Shoeboxcompressor.com tech support address asking for details about how to ship the unit to them for repairs, and "Tom" emailed me back the same day, doing everything he could (politely) to talk me out of that. He first pointed me to the really wonderful how-to videos on their Support page, which I watched several times. I am not very mechanically savvy at all, but I gathered up the courage to rebuild one of the cylinders in my unit using some o-rings that came with it, and when that did not do the job (symptoms did not change) Tom patiently talked me thru adjusting the spring that works the shutoff switch--an easy job involving one little grub screw and moving a collar about a quarter of an inch out to the very end of the piston rod (the max adjustment). Immediately after this the compressor regained the ability to go to 4000 psi before shutting off. Tom's final diagnosis: A defective (weak) spring, a replacement for which is now being shipped to me. The cost to me for all this hand-holding (via multiple emails) and one (1) replacement spring: No charge!

What more can I say? I love the fact that my Shoebox was invented in the USA, is American made, and is supported by people who would rather help me fix things myself than profit from doing simple repairs at the factory with me footing the bill for both labor and (due to heavy weight) big shipping charges both ways. I just wanted to share this recent experience of mine with anyone out there who might be thinking of buying a Shoebox but is fearful of maintaining it. I'm a target shooter and a lover but not at all a mechanic; and yet I now think that I can probably handle any future maintenance needs that my Shoebox may develop, and I believe that if I can do it, most of my fellow airgunners can too.
nice to hear a company standing behind and not hasseling a customer. nt
Quote
Share

Joined: August 3rd, 2009, 5:14 pm

August 9th, 2012, 9:16 pm #4

I own an older 4500 psi Shoebox compressor (#251) that I had to "stand in line" for months to purchase when they first started taking orders for them. Just last week it began showing signs of advancing age (or so I thought) with its automatic shutoff point dropping down to around 3500 psi. I emailed the Shoeboxcompressor.com tech support address asking for details about how to ship the unit to them for repairs, and "Tom" emailed me back the same day, doing everything he could (politely) to talk me out of that. He first pointed me to the really wonderful how-to videos on their Support page, which I watched several times. I am not very mechanically savvy at all, but I gathered up the courage to rebuild one of the cylinders in my unit using some o-rings that came with it, and when that did not do the job (symptoms did not change) Tom patiently talked me thru adjusting the spring that works the shutoff switch--an easy job involving one little grub screw and moving a collar about a quarter of an inch out to the very end of the piston rod (the max adjustment). Immediately after this the compressor regained the ability to go to 4000 psi before shutting off. Tom's final diagnosis: A defective (weak) spring, a replacement for which is now being shipped to me. The cost to me for all this hand-holding (via multiple emails) and one (1) replacement spring: No charge!

What more can I say? I love the fact that my Shoebox was invented in the USA, is American made, and is supported by people who would rather help me fix things myself than profit from doing simple repairs at the factory with me footing the bill for both labor and (due to heavy weight) big shipping charges both ways. I just wanted to share this recent experience of mine with anyone out there who might be thinking of buying a Shoebox but is fearful of maintaining it. I'm a target shooter and a lover but not at all a mechanic; and yet I now think that I can probably handle any future maintenance needs that my Shoebox may develop, and I believe that if I can do it, most of my fellow airgunners can too.
be a gentleman of the utmost caliber. I will be getting one when I get the funds saved up.
Good to see someone not motivated by greed and trying to gouge you for every little thing.
I am so sick of that mentality. Just yesterday had the Dr. office charge me $40.00 for a missed
appointment that I never knew I had and refuse to take it off my bill. Money grubbing, greedy
bastards. Hope they get what they deserve as it seems they do this to alot of people from how the
office lady handled it. Ahhh....ok rant over:)
Quote
Share

Joined: July 8th, 2012, 11:47 am

August 9th, 2012, 9:51 pm #5

I own an older 4500 psi Shoebox compressor (#251) that I had to "stand in line" for months to purchase when they first started taking orders for them. Just last week it began showing signs of advancing age (or so I thought) with its automatic shutoff point dropping down to around 3500 psi. I emailed the Shoeboxcompressor.com tech support address asking for details about how to ship the unit to them for repairs, and "Tom" emailed me back the same day, doing everything he could (politely) to talk me out of that. He first pointed me to the really wonderful how-to videos on their Support page, which I watched several times. I am not very mechanically savvy at all, but I gathered up the courage to rebuild one of the cylinders in my unit using some o-rings that came with it, and when that did not do the job (symptoms did not change) Tom patiently talked me thru adjusting the spring that works the shutoff switch--an easy job involving one little grub screw and moving a collar about a quarter of an inch out to the very end of the piston rod (the max adjustment). Immediately after this the compressor regained the ability to go to 4000 psi before shutting off. Tom's final diagnosis: A defective (weak) spring, a replacement for which is now being shipped to me. The cost to me for all this hand-holding (via multiple emails) and one (1) replacement spring: No charge!

What more can I say? I love the fact that my Shoebox was invented in the USA, is American made, and is supported by people who would rather help me fix things myself than profit from doing simple repairs at the factory with me footing the bill for both labor and (due to heavy weight) big shipping charges both ways. I just wanted to share this recent experience of mine with anyone out there who might be thinking of buying a Shoebox but is fearful of maintaining it. I'm a target shooter and a lover but not at all a mechanic; and yet I now think that I can probably handle any future maintenance needs that my Shoebox may develop, and I believe that if I can do it, most of my fellow airgunners can too.
Great Post! It's wonderful to hear that you were taken care of.
I know now that I will be able to count on them!
Quote
Share

Joined: June 17th, 2009, 3:55 am

August 10th, 2012, 1:02 am #6

I own an older 4500 psi Shoebox compressor (#251) that I had to "stand in line" for months to purchase when they first started taking orders for them. Just last week it began showing signs of advancing age (or so I thought) with its automatic shutoff point dropping down to around 3500 psi. I emailed the Shoeboxcompressor.com tech support address asking for details about how to ship the unit to them for repairs, and "Tom" emailed me back the same day, doing everything he could (politely) to talk me out of that. He first pointed me to the really wonderful how-to videos on their Support page, which I watched several times. I am not very mechanically savvy at all, but I gathered up the courage to rebuild one of the cylinders in my unit using some o-rings that came with it, and when that did not do the job (symptoms did not change) Tom patiently talked me thru adjusting the spring that works the shutoff switch--an easy job involving one little grub screw and moving a collar about a quarter of an inch out to the very end of the piston rod (the max adjustment). Immediately after this the compressor regained the ability to go to 4000 psi before shutting off. Tom's final diagnosis: A defective (weak) spring, a replacement for which is now being shipped to me. The cost to me for all this hand-holding (via multiple emails) and one (1) replacement spring: No charge!

What more can I say? I love the fact that my Shoebox was invented in the USA, is American made, and is supported by people who would rather help me fix things myself than profit from doing simple repairs at the factory with me footing the bill for both labor and (due to heavy weight) big shipping charges both ways. I just wanted to share this recent experience of mine with anyone out there who might be thinking of buying a Shoebox but is fearful of maintaining it. I'm a target shooter and a lover but not at all a mechanic; and yet I now think that I can probably handle any future maintenance needs that my Shoebox may develop, and I believe that if I can do it, most of my fellow airgunners can too.
I have emailed Tom on a few occasions to ask him some questions about the shoebox, he and his wife Carol can't be beat for customer service! they go out of there way to help you and to figure out what is going on if you do run into a problem. It makes owning one a breeze! I went through a rebuild once in the two years I have owned mine! bought the belt drive and figured that was a good time to change out the orings! It didn't really need it but orings are cheap!
Last edited by eddieirvine on August 10th, 2012, 1:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joined: October 14th, 2010, 4:05 am

August 10th, 2012, 1:16 am #7

I own an older 4500 psi Shoebox compressor (#251) that I had to "stand in line" for months to purchase when they first started taking orders for them. Just last week it began showing signs of advancing age (or so I thought) with its automatic shutoff point dropping down to around 3500 psi. I emailed the Shoeboxcompressor.com tech support address asking for details about how to ship the unit to them for repairs, and "Tom" emailed me back the same day, doing everything he could (politely) to talk me out of that. He first pointed me to the really wonderful how-to videos on their Support page, which I watched several times. I am not very mechanically savvy at all, but I gathered up the courage to rebuild one of the cylinders in my unit using some o-rings that came with it, and when that did not do the job (symptoms did not change) Tom patiently talked me thru adjusting the spring that works the shutoff switch--an easy job involving one little grub screw and moving a collar about a quarter of an inch out to the very end of the piston rod (the max adjustment). Immediately after this the compressor regained the ability to go to 4000 psi before shutting off. Tom's final diagnosis: A defective (weak) spring, a replacement for which is now being shipped to me. The cost to me for all this hand-holding (via multiple emails) and one (1) replacement spring: No charge!

What more can I say? I love the fact that my Shoebox was invented in the USA, is American made, and is supported by people who would rather help me fix things myself than profit from doing simple repairs at the factory with me footing the bill for both labor and (due to heavy weight) big shipping charges both ways. I just wanted to share this recent experience of mine with anyone out there who might be thinking of buying a Shoebox but is fearful of maintaining it. I'm a target shooter and a lover but not at all a mechanic; and yet I now think that I can probably handle any future maintenance needs that my Shoebox may develop, and I believe that if I can do it, most of my fellow airgunners can too.
Thanks for the nice compliments. I designed the compressor for it to be worked on by the user. That is always the best way because it's the shortest road to happiness when there is a problem.

Tom Kaye
Quote
Share

Joined: January 2nd, 2001, 4:27 am

August 10th, 2012, 1:30 am #8

I own an older 4500 psi Shoebox compressor (#251) that I had to "stand in line" for months to purchase when they first started taking orders for them. Just last week it began showing signs of advancing age (or so I thought) with its automatic shutoff point dropping down to around 3500 psi. I emailed the Shoeboxcompressor.com tech support address asking for details about how to ship the unit to them for repairs, and "Tom" emailed me back the same day, doing everything he could (politely) to talk me out of that. He first pointed me to the really wonderful how-to videos on their Support page, which I watched several times. I am not very mechanically savvy at all, but I gathered up the courage to rebuild one of the cylinders in my unit using some o-rings that came with it, and when that did not do the job (symptoms did not change) Tom patiently talked me thru adjusting the spring that works the shutoff switch--an easy job involving one little grub screw and moving a collar about a quarter of an inch out to the very end of the piston rod (the max adjustment). Immediately after this the compressor regained the ability to go to 4000 psi before shutting off. Tom's final diagnosis: A defective (weak) spring, a replacement for which is now being shipped to me. The cost to me for all this hand-holding (via multiple emails) and one (1) replacement spring: No charge!

What more can I say? I love the fact that my Shoebox was invented in the USA, is American made, and is supported by people who would rather help me fix things myself than profit from doing simple repairs at the factory with me footing the bill for both labor and (due to heavy weight) big shipping charges both ways. I just wanted to share this recent experience of mine with anyone out there who might be thinking of buying a Shoebox but is fearful of maintaining it. I'm a target shooter and a lover but not at all a mechanic; and yet I now think that I can probably handle any future maintenance needs that my Shoebox may develop, and I believe that if I can do it, most of my fellow airgunners can too.
Vortex ,it some problems I'm have with a gun?i think their sending it for free?

system overloaded
Quote
Share

Joined: October 22nd, 2009, 6:06 am

August 10th, 2012, 3:04 am #9

Tom is a great guy.

My shoebox was one of last chain driven models so it's been vetted well. It has been a good piece of equipment and works very well. The shoebox is highly recommended.
Quote
Share

Joined: June 14th, 2012, 8:59 pm

August 10th, 2012, 4:19 am #10

I own an older 4500 psi Shoebox compressor (#251) that I had to "stand in line" for months to purchase when they first started taking orders for them. Just last week it began showing signs of advancing age (or so I thought) with its automatic shutoff point dropping down to around 3500 psi. I emailed the Shoeboxcompressor.com tech support address asking for details about how to ship the unit to them for repairs, and "Tom" emailed me back the same day, doing everything he could (politely) to talk me out of that. He first pointed me to the really wonderful how-to videos on their Support page, which I watched several times. I am not very mechanically savvy at all, but I gathered up the courage to rebuild one of the cylinders in my unit using some o-rings that came with it, and when that did not do the job (symptoms did not change) Tom patiently talked me thru adjusting the spring that works the shutoff switch--an easy job involving one little grub screw and moving a collar about a quarter of an inch out to the very end of the piston rod (the max adjustment). Immediately after this the compressor regained the ability to go to 4000 psi before shutting off. Tom's final diagnosis: A defective (weak) spring, a replacement for which is now being shipped to me. The cost to me for all this hand-holding (via multiple emails) and one (1) replacement spring: No charge!

What more can I say? I love the fact that my Shoebox was invented in the USA, is American made, and is supported by people who would rather help me fix things myself than profit from doing simple repairs at the factory with me footing the bill for both labor and (due to heavy weight) big shipping charges both ways. I just wanted to share this recent experience of mine with anyone out there who might be thinking of buying a Shoebox but is fearful of maintaining it. I'm a target shooter and a lover but not at all a mechanic; and yet I now think that I can probably handle any future maintenance needs that my Shoebox may develop, and I believe that if I can do it, most of my fellow airgunners can too.
He definitely goes the extra mile with a great product and excellent service.

--------------
If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got.
Quote
Share