Question for our scope Guru's!

Question for our scope Guru's!

Joined: October 19th, 2005, 12:48 am

May 8th, 2012, 8:33 pm #1

What would you expect to happen when you have a rifle zeroed in with high mounts then install low mounts to the same setup?
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Joined: October 28th, 2003, 9:58 pm

May 8th, 2012, 8:36 pm #2

.
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Joined: September 2nd, 2009, 3:21 am

May 8th, 2012, 9:01 pm #3

What would you expect to happen when you have a rifle zeroed in with high mounts then install low mounts to the same setup?
...lowering the scope helps will give you less chance of canting the air rifle & also hopefully your cheek rest can be lowered to accomodate your new lower hold. Of course you trajectory would flat-line at the closer distances and I think your scope needs to just have enough clearance to clear the barrel.Bill,your question is complex but I feel lowering is Better and the Best.TKZ, Hector Alfaro
Last edited by H.Alfaro on May 8th, 2012, 9:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 6th, 2002, 8:59 pm

May 8th, 2012, 9:10 pm #4

What would you expect to happen when you have a rifle zeroed in with high mounts then install low mounts to the same setup?
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lhd
Joined: January 9th, 2002, 2:30 am

May 8th, 2012, 10:09 pm #5

...lowering the scope helps will give you less chance of canting the air rifle & also hopefully your cheek rest can be lowered to accomodate your new lower hold. Of course you trajectory would flat-line at the closer distances and I think your scope needs to just have enough clearance to clear the barrel.Bill,your question is complex but I feel lowering is Better and the Best.TKZ, Hector Alfaro
It actually EASIER to detect the gun being canted when the scope is high. But I use a spirit level, so its a moot point.

When shooting Hunter class, which I have been doing for awhile, its for sure an advantage to have your scope just as low as it can be on a practical level, since it reduces the huge amount of elevation correction normally required for the really short range targets by up to 50%, while the impact on long range ones seems pretty minor in comparison unless your gun is really wimp level.
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Joined: October 19th, 2005, 12:48 am

May 8th, 2012, 10:35 pm #6

What would you expect to happen when you have a rifle zeroed in with high mounts then install low mounts to the same setup?
was not working well without raising the cheek piece. In the hunter class that is not allowed so I opted to buy low mounts for my centerpoint. Low mounts in 30mm with 9-11mm rail dovetail are not that plentiful. I received the mounts today and was surprised to discover that with the new setup my poi was only about 3" low. Once I got it zeroed in at 20 yards I found that at 30 yards I did not have to change a thing where with my previous setup I had to aim at the bottom of a 1" spot to hit the center. Seems I went from double zeros at 20 and 40 yards to zeros at 20 and 30 yards with poi at 40 yards only about 1/2" low. It is raining so maybe that had a little influence on my new sight pattern.
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Joined: October 6th, 2008, 2:03 pm

May 9th, 2012, 10:42 am #7

...lowering the scope helps will give you less chance of canting the air rifle & also hopefully your cheek rest can be lowered to accomodate your new lower hold. Of course you trajectory would flat-line at the closer distances and I think your scope needs to just have enough clearance to clear the barrel.Bill,your question is complex but I feel lowering is Better and the Best.TKZ, Hector Alfaro
For what it's worth, I recently found a fascinating, experimental article (the author shot his rifle in orientations from vertical to upside down with two drastically different scope heights) by Hungarian shooter Andras Fekete Moro about assumptions of scope height mounting:

http://www.szottesfold.co.uk/2012/03/hi ... cient.html

His summary: "In spite of the ancient myth, the height of the rifle scope doesn't mean more sensitivity for canting errors. In most instances it's totally indifferent while with a particular aiming method it can be worse or even better than the low mounted scope."

It's worth a good read.

All the best,

Matt B.
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Joined: September 28th, 2000, 12:50 am

May 9th, 2012, 2:45 pm #8

Though I do think that lower mounting heights are preferable for those of us that do NOT click.

A different aspect is how prone the shooter is to cant with a high, or a low mount. Note that I am talking about the shooter, not the system's sensitivity to cant, but the shooter's propensity to it. Of course it all comes down to stock fit and cheek weld, where allowed by the powerplant.

Europeans favour a straight up head position, whereas Americans and British, typically shoot with a more craned neck. IMHO, that is more important than the systemic aspects.
I've noted that lower head positions make you note easier if you are canting the rifle or not. It's all in the peripheral vision of the action and it's relation to the world. Higher head positions lead to a "vaccuum" where the eye looses contact with the outside world and concentrates on the sight picture alone. This may be good for some, and not so good for others. It's all in our own peculiar and individual style.

Because we cannot trust the terrain around us to be flat and level in some venues, even holding our peripheral vision open and in contact with the land there is still a chance to cant while "thinking" or "feeling" that we are level, especially in strongly inclined shots. That stresses the importance of having a level on the rifle, and of using it.

Good read, thanks again!





Un Abrazo!




H�ctor
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Joined: August 14th, 2004, 2:44 am

May 12th, 2012, 10:09 pm #9

It actually EASIER to detect the gun being canted when the scope is high. But I use a spirit level, so its a moot point.

When shooting Hunter class, which I have been doing for awhile, its for sure an advantage to have your scope just as low as it can be on a practical level, since it reduces the huge amount of elevation correction normally required for the really short range targets by up to 50%, while the impact on long range ones seems pretty minor in comparison unless your gun is really wimp level.
In open class, I find higher works best for me. With a 30 yard zero, I don't click at all from 22-38 yards. Only a few clicks out to 55 & rangefinding errors at that end aren't as critical.

You're right that at the short end things get busy in a hurry.... but it's a LOT easier to rangefind at 10 yards than 55. And I can shoot the whole course on one round of the turret.


BS
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