My FWB124D walnut stock project is done☺ long with pics

My FWB124D walnut stock project is done☺ long with pics

Joined: May 16th, 2006, 8:30 pm

December 2nd, 2017, 12:59 am #1

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.

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Joined: February 16th, 2014, 1:17 pm

December 2nd, 2017, 1:06 am #2

Beautiful. A left hand version will be fine for my 124.
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Joined: October 23rd, 2011, 7:34 am

December 2nd, 2017, 1:15 am #3

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.
looks good randy, a lot going on with the grain made a nice stock Nt
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Joined: October 23rd, 2011, 7:34 am

December 2nd, 2017, 1:15 am #4

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.
looks good randy, a lot going on with the grain made a nice stock Nt
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Joined: August 10th, 2007, 5:51 am

December 2nd, 2017, 3:00 am #5

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.
I like it a lot. You should be proud of that.
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Joined: September 10th, 2005, 8:31 pm

December 2nd, 2017, 3:30 am #6

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.
Looks great for the first stock project you did good!!!!
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Joined: January 2nd, 2001, 4:27 am

December 2nd, 2017, 3:51 am #7

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.
Where their's a well their's a way,awesome""
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Joined: July 12th, 2016, 11:40 pm

December 2nd, 2017, 4:20 am #8

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.
Outstanding Job!! nft.
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Joined: April 20th, 2001, 3:49 am

December 2nd, 2017, 5:30 am #9

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.
I drooled on my keyboard. Beautiful rifle! Thanks for posting.
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Joined: July 19th, 2003, 12:46 pm

December 2nd, 2017, 8:59 am #10

I finally had some time to get started on my FWB stock project . I made a few mistakes along the way but for my First stock I think it turned out pretty good. It’s definatley not perfect but it’s better than a broken one.
This stock started life as a factory second for a Weatherby rifle from Calico Hardwoods in CA. It cost me $37.00 shipped . The only reason I see it was a second was the knot hole in the toe of the stock. Otherwise it is a great piece of wood.

















First up as getting a jig made and mounting the stock in it to cut the receiver channel. After getting it mounted up I needed to come up with a bit for the router. My uncle suggested making one out of a 1" wood bit and I knew I had one or two laying around so I dug one out and went to grinding on it. Problem was that the shank was 5/16" in dia and I needed 1/4" to fit the router. So I chucked it up in my lathe and turned it down. Worked out perfectly and did the job for me.









The barrel channel is larger than 1" and I sanded it to size with a dowel rod wrapped with sandpaper. The receiver fitting was a chore and that is where I made some mistakes. I thought long and hard about how to get the front screw holes drilled at the correct angle. I came up with the idea of making a receiver tube jig out of a heavy piece of pic pipe which was the right dia. I taped it in the old stock and drilled it from the screw side out the other side so I would have my hole pattern. I then taped it in my new stock and drilled from the top side out. Worked perfectly!



I’m limited on wood working tools, in fact I borrowed the router and some forstner bits from my uncle. Cutting the slot for the cocking linkage was harder than it seems. Every step of the way I was thinking about how I could screw this up. And I almost did a few times but I finally got it done.
I did screw up and take too much off where the trigger guard sits so I made an escutcheon to bring it back to the right height.





I did a final test fit and shot it a few times to make sure it all worked then took it apart and started the final sanding. I finished it with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Now I have a nice FWB 124 with a walnut stock that I am proud to own.
















Thanks all for looking.
This was a fun and rewarding project and I'm already looking forward to my next one.
with a piece of epoxied ebony and sand it in to where it should be?
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