MiniGTX dimensioned drawing - okay, so it's ugly.

MiniGTX dimensioned drawing - okay, so it's ugly.

Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

September 8th, 2006, 2:02 pm #1

But it also gives a Gamo a ~1 pound 2-stage trigger - and that's kinda' purty.

Tips:

1. Drill the holes before cutting the strip.
2. Polishing and molying the tip of the screw will make the trigger smoother.








Steve
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Joined: August 5th, 2006, 11:55 pm

September 8th, 2006, 3:17 pm #2

I have your real deal GTX-II trigger, but can you explain the theory. Really Neat!

Chris
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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

September 8th, 2006, 4:22 pm #3

During the 1st stage of trigger actuation, the creep adjustment screw of both GTXs provides a multiplied mechanical advantage that brings the sear to the edge of break and discharge. This leaves the stock "Fat" pin to just lightly touch the sear and create the 2nd stage break.

In the "Mini", the adjustment screw load is transfered to the trigger pivot pin by the sheet metal "bump" between holes 3 and 4. Meanwhile the loop between holes 1 and 2 wraps around the trigger spring pin, and positiviely locates the Mini in the blade.

The Mini can be made of thin sheet metal and still be robust, because of the way it's solidly supported by the stock blade pins (pivot and spring).

Steve
Last edited by pneuguy on September 8th, 2006, 4:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

September 8th, 2006, 9:16 pm #4

But it also gives a Gamo a ~1 pound 2-stage trigger - and that's kinda' purty.

Tips:

1. Drill the holes before cutting the strip.
2. Polishing and molying the tip of the screw will make the trigger smoother.








Steve
...that I'd missed. In the best spirit of Shareware (shAIRwAIR?) I've incorporated his observation into the design. Thanks, Walter.

Chinese variants of the Gamo trigger have a different positioning of the pin holes in blade, so that inadequate clearance exists between the pins for the adjustment screw.

The interference less than 1/32", and the pin is 5/32" in diameter. So a quick, simple, and safe fix is to grind a flat on the pin to clear the screw, now added to the drawing, above.

Steve
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Joined: February 4th, 2006, 8:11 pm

September 9th, 2006, 12:39 am #5

But it also gives a Gamo a ~1 pound 2-stage trigger - and that's kinda' purty.

Tips:

1. Drill the holes before cutting the strip.
2. Polishing and molying the tip of the screw will make the trigger smoother.








Steve
-nt
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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

September 9th, 2006, 1:07 am #6



Steve
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Joined: August 5th, 2006, 11:55 pm

September 9th, 2006, 1:30 am #7

.
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Joined: June 4th, 2006, 8:08 pm

September 9th, 2006, 2:41 am #8

But it also gives a Gamo a ~1 pound 2-stage trigger - and that's kinda' purty.

Tips:

1. Drill the holes before cutting the strip.
2. Polishing and molying the tip of the screw will make the trigger smoother.








Steve
nt
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Joined: October 25th, 2002, 3:46 pm

September 9th, 2006, 9:50 pm #9

But it also gives a Gamo a ~1 pound 2-stage trigger - and that's kinda' purty.

Tips:

1. Drill the holes before cutting the strip.
2. Polishing and molying the tip of the screw will make the trigger smoother.








Steve
Steve, made the leap, installed and adjusted, added a trigger spring as wanted a positive return for the trigger. Has a long first stage with crisp very short 2nd stage.
Thank you for sharing your trigger ideas!
Walter....
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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

September 10th, 2006, 5:53 am #10

Would it be convenient for you to share any graphic details?

Steve
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