List of pellet head/skirt dimensions?

List of pellet head/skirt dimensions?

Joined: April 21st, 2001, 7:46 pm

January 4th, 2018, 8:30 pm #1

Would anyone know where I can find a listing of head and skirt dimensions for various .22 pellets? I need some .22 pellets that are particularly narrow, as the feeding mechanism in my vintage gas pistol is a casting that is known to break under pressure. The loading trough does not permit the use of a pellet probe to start the pellets into the rifling. I have to rely on the bolt probe and it's a somewhat delicate design. Thanks.
Reply
Share

Joined: June 4th, 2013, 4:42 am

January 4th, 2018, 9:55 pm #2

...probably the answer you need

For your particular concern, I suggest the JSB RS 13.4gr for several reasons:

1. The heads of JSB pellets seldom measure larger than 5.51mm.
2. JSB uses soft lead.
3. Skirts are always a few thousandths larger than the heads, and the thin skirt of the 13.4gr pellets combined with the soft lead will ease chambering.
4. It’s a lightweight pellet which is usually desirable for the low velocity of pistols.
5. JSB makes the best pellets in the business.

Regarding a table which has dimensions of various pellets, I am not aware of any such resource. You will find variations from batch to batch amongst every brand and type of pellet so even if there were such a thing, the numbers would have to expressed as a range and would only be valid for the particular batch on hand at the time.
Reply
Share

Joined: August 22nd, 2003, 11:16 pm

January 4th, 2018, 10:29 pm #3

Would anyone know where I can find a listing of head and skirt dimensions for various .22 pellets? I need some .22 pellets that are particularly narrow, as the feeding mechanism in my vintage gas pistol is a casting that is known to break under pressure. The loading trough does not permit the use of a pellet probe to start the pellets into the rifling. I have to rely on the bolt probe and it's a somewhat delicate design. Thanks.
Crosman pellets, points/domes/WCs run to the smaller dimensions (heads and skirts).

The reference is "American Air Rifles" James House, pg 55. Older reference, and manufacturing tolerances can always change. For what it's worth
Reply
Share

Joined: June 4th, 2013, 4:42 am

January 4th, 2018, 10:44 pm #4

Because I’ve kept records of measured head sizes since 2012 and Crosman pellets (mostly CPHP and CPUM in .177 and .22 cal) have trended large in recent years. A lot of variability and frequently out-of-round but trending large on average. Pretty common to see 4.52 – 4.55mm in .177 cal, and 5.52 – 5.56mm in .22 cal, taking care not to measure across the mold parting line.
Reply
Share

Joined: September 15th, 2000, 7:59 pm

January 4th, 2018, 10:46 pm #5

Would anyone know where I can find a listing of head and skirt dimensions for various .22 pellets? I need some .22 pellets that are particularly narrow, as the feeding mechanism in my vintage gas pistol is a casting that is known to break under pressure. The loading trough does not permit the use of a pellet probe to start the pellets into the rifling. I have to rely on the bolt probe and it's a somewhat delicate design. Thanks.
Hard Air Magazine has done some evaluations on a few pellets, and quite often we see head sizes off a bit from manufacturers claims. There is also a distribution of head sizes, larger on some types of pellets than others. We haven't even attempted to measure skirt sizes, because they always get swaged down when chambering. If you're worried about skirt sizes, you could always make up, or have made, a sizing die.
Reply
Share

Joined: April 21st, 2001, 7:46 pm

January 4th, 2018, 11:48 pm #6

...probably the answer you need

For your particular concern, I suggest the JSB RS 13.4gr for several reasons:

1. The heads of JSB pellets seldom measure larger than 5.51mm.
2. JSB uses soft lead.
3. Skirts are always a few thousandths larger than the heads, and the thin skirt of the 13.4gr pellets combined with the soft lead will ease chambering.
4. It’s a lightweight pellet which is usually desirable for the low velocity of pistols.
5. JSB makes the best pellets in the business.

Regarding a table which has dimensions of various pellets, I am not aware of any such resource. You will find variations from batch to batch amongst every brand and type of pellet so even if there were such a thing, the numbers would have to expressed as a range and would only be valid for the particular batch on hand at the time.
Reply
Share

Joined: April 21st, 2001, 7:46 pm

January 4th, 2018, 11:56 pm #7

Hard Air Magazine has done some evaluations on a few pellets, and quite often we see head sizes off a bit from manufacturers claims. There is also a distribution of head sizes, larger on some types of pellets than others. We haven't even attempted to measure skirt sizes, because they always get swaged down when chambering. If you're worried about skirt sizes, you could always make up, or have made, a sizing die.
Reply
Share

Joined: April 21st, 2001, 7:46 pm

January 4th, 2018, 11:58 pm #8

Crosman pellets, points/domes/WCs run to the smaller dimensions (heads and skirts).

The reference is "American Air Rifles" James House, pg 55. Older reference, and manufacturing tolerances can always change. For what it's worth
Reply
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2004, 12:07 am

January 5th, 2018, 1:59 am #9

Would anyone know where I can find a listing of head and skirt dimensions for various .22 pellets? I need some .22 pellets that are particularly narrow, as the feeding mechanism in my vintage gas pistol is a casting that is known to break under pressure. The loading trough does not permit the use of a pellet probe to start the pellets into the rifling. I have to rely on the bolt probe and it's a somewhat delicate design. Thanks.
nt
Reply
Share

Joined: May 24th, 2013, 11:28 am

January 5th, 2018, 2:58 am #10

Would anyone know where I can find a listing of head and skirt dimensions for various .22 pellets? I need some .22 pellets that are particularly narrow, as the feeding mechanism in my vintage gas pistol is a casting that is known to break under pressure. The loading trough does not permit the use of a pellet probe to start the pellets into the rifling. I have to rely on the bolt probe and it's a somewhat delicate design. Thanks.
has a chart with all the info you are looking for , it has been around for a very long time.Doug
Reply
Share