Leupold?

Leupold?

Joined: November 20th, 2008, 2:47 pm

October 26th, 2010, 11:32 pm #1

I am not going to be getting a Leupold any time soon I am happy with the Busy and I do not have the money right now. However, I was wondering why do most folks shoot the 35 and not the 40 or even 45? Also where do you get side wheels for the Leupold?


Every Blessing
Alan
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Joined: July 6th, 2002, 8:59 pm

October 27th, 2010, 12:07 am #2

1) 35x seems plenty for range-finding
2) On a fixed power scope, more than 35x makes it tougher to find targets up-front, and shooting offhand.

I chose a 40x (prefer it on the long shots), and overtime have gotten used to it; but, 35x is by far the most popular choice.

HookEm

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Joined: March 30th, 2007, 4:56 am

October 27th, 2010, 12:18 am #3

I am not going to be getting a Leupold any time soon I am happy with the Busy and I do not have the money right now. However, I was wondering why do most folks shoot the 35 and not the 40 or even 45? Also where do you get side wheels for the Leupold?


Every Blessing
Alan
... over the 35x for range finding. I found the 35x isn't as easy to range find with the 40x.

I'm now using a new gen Nikko, and I only take it off 50x for the standing shots.. I've never found target acquisition a problem.

Tom
CAFTA Governor
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Joined: February 1st, 2006, 1:12 am

October 27th, 2010, 12:37 am #4

I am not going to be getting a Leupold any time soon I am happy with the Busy and I do not have the money right now. However, I was wondering why do most folks shoot the 35 and not the 40 or even 45? Also where do you get side wheels for the Leupold?


Every Blessing
Alan
Alan,

I prefer the Leupold 35x for several reasons. Besides the obvious, it having wonderful optics, mine range finds great at 35x. 35x seems to be the best magnification to me overall since it also works well for offhand shots. I found a long time ago that when I went up in magnification to 50x, my scores came down. I think it's an unconcious over compensation that happens when I am trying to focus with on a target, but perceive more movement in my scope due to the higher magnification. As is with my 35x, the reticle tends to appear pretty steady on the distant targets.

I would encourage anyone that's planning to drop the change on a scope like the Leupold Comp series to personally check a few out first. Try one at 35x then compare it to one at 40x and see for yourself.

See you Saturday?

Harold
Harold Rushton
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Joined: November 20th, 2008, 2:47 pm

October 27th, 2010, 12:58 am #5

My busy at 32 is moving pretty good lol I bet it would be a blur at 40 lol
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Joined: December 27th, 2008, 8:55 am

October 27th, 2010, 1:14 am #6

I am not going to be getting a Leupold any time soon I am happy with the Busy and I do not have the money right now. However, I was wondering why do most folks shoot the 35 and not the 40 or even 45? Also where do you get side wheels for the Leupold?


Every Blessing
Alan
Side wheel by Rick Lake

CONTACT
http://www.lakepm.com/



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Matthew Saenz
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Joined: October 27th, 2003, 11:32 pm

October 27th, 2010, 1:15 am #7

1) 35x seems plenty for range-finding
2) On a fixed power scope, more than 35x makes it tougher to find targets up-front, and shooting offhand.

I chose a 40x (prefer it on the long shots), and overtime have gotten used to it; but, 35x is by far the most popular choice.

HookEm






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Joined: November 20th, 2008, 2:47 pm

October 27th, 2010, 1:39 am #8

Side wheel by Rick Lake

CONTACT
http://www.lakepm.com/



[/IMG]

Matthew Saenz
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Joined: December 16th, 2002, 9:38 pm

October 27th, 2010, 11:32 am #9

I am not going to be getting a Leupold any time soon I am happy with the Busy and I do not have the money right now. However, I was wondering why do most folks shoot the 35 and not the 40 or even 45? Also where do you get side wheels for the Leupold?


Every Blessing
Alan
One thing not mentioned above is that for any given objective diameter, one gets more light through the scope at lower powers (up to a point, but that is at pretty low powers). A brighter image is worth a lot when shooting dark targets on dark lanes!

The Leupold also is the only scope I know of that somehow expands the scale for ranging at longer distances. On a Nikko and similar scopes, the distance on even a large wheel for 45 to 55 yards is often about 1/4" -- for my 35X the distance on my 5" or so wheel (Rick Lake) is about 1" or so. This makes for far easier focusing at long distances. People criticize the scope for not "snapping" into focus -- in actuality this is a side-effect of the magnified scale; if the scale were not expanded, the scope would "snap" but ranging ability would drop (IMHO).

Scope power is vastly over-rated IMHO. I also shoot service rifle with 1X iron sights. While I am somewhat challenged by age and eyesight, I can still shoot quite well -- the "trick" is being able to see the target. Paper targets have a large bullseye for aiming -- the only advantage of greater magnification for actually shooting is being able to see the target. I once tried shooting with a zoom scope (I now have a 35X Comp) and tried shooting the IFP target at 40X down to 8X -- only when I got to 8X did my scores start dropping (and this was before I started shooting service rifle). It requires more concentration on aiming as the magnification drops, but accuracy is largely unaffected.

Finally, focusing is largely a function of objective diameter (same as light gathering ability). Larger diameter objectives will have a shorter depth of field (camera lens term) and focusing ability is probably like aiming -- if you can see the target clearly at a given magnification, then magnification beyond that probably does not improve on ranging. If the magnification starts reducing image brightness significantly, I suspect ranging becomes very "iffy."

Best,



[url=mailto:joem5636@gmail.com?subject=2010%20AAFTA%20Nationals]Joe McDaniel[/url]
DIFTA Match Director
AAFTA Webmaster and Chair
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Joined: March 14th, 2009, 9:32 pm

October 27th, 2010, 12:17 pm #10

Joe mentioned that "focusing is largely a function of objective diameter (same as light gathering ability)". If light gathering is a function of objective size then why does my Nikko with such a large objective and set at 35X seem to appear so much darker then a Leu 35X? DOes the point that the Nikko is a zoom scope degrade it's light gathering as compared to the fixed 35x leup or is that the nikko glass is inferior to the leup? I looked thru Al Otters S&Bender zoom and his was much brighter then my nikko.

I own the newer Nikko and I find it range finds very well and does "snap into" focus but I am not happy with the brightness or the clarity of the scope as compared to the leup. I tried the 35X leup and although the range distance is much greater from 50-55 on the wheel then the nikko I found it difficult to repeat the distance. People have told me it's a longer learning curve using the leup and with so many great shooters using the leup I tend to beleive that. Do owners of the 35x leup find it difficult to range a target at say 54 yards multiple times and repeatly come up with 54 yds? Or do you find it varies and if so by how much? How long did it take you to get consistancy? If it's 1 yd then it may be the same result as the nikko because the distance is so small on the nikko wheel thus I would go with the brighter and clearer leup.

I really have to spend some time looking thru a leup 35X for a couple days because I really want a clearer and brighter alternative then I currently have. With so many individuals praising the 35x leup I really have to get off my a$$ and do it. I just have to find a shooter with one close to my area. spending 10 minutes with one at a shoot is just not enough time.
Last edited by deer16pt on October 27th, 2010, 12:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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