I wish Ruger would chamber the No.1 in 35 remington,.....

I wish Ruger would chamber the No.1 in 35 remington,.....

Joined: August 3rd, 2006, 4:53 am

May 11th, 2012, 1:00 am #1

Custom job would run around 2 grand yikes!

From time to time Everyone should squish some mudd between their toe's!!!!!!
Last edited by bigwhack416remingtonmagnum on May 11th, 2012, 1:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 10th, 2003, 5:24 am

May 11th, 2012, 3:30 am #2

I've seen two of them. If I had about $2600 to throw around, the last one would have been mine.

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Joined: August 3rd, 2006, 4:53 am

May 11th, 2012, 2:53 pm #3

But I agree if I had the cash and a 45-70 Tropical chamber No.1 showed up it would be going home. When I called a couple of noted No.1 smiths and asked how much for a 35 rem with med sporter barrel: they just laughed. N0o.1 are hard to work with. First a whole new ejector has to be made and then the barrel shank has to be fitted to the ejector and then chambered. I wanted to get a longer throat for lead casties over 230 grs. the one willing said he'd start at 2 grand and go from there. OUCH!

From time to time Everyone should squish some mudd between their toe's!!!!!!
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

May 11th, 2012, 4:12 pm #4


I never fired the 100.

The .45-100 throws a considerably more massive slug than the 70.

He (and his wife) are also into .50 BMG long-range bench-rest shooting.

A woman who fires a .50 BMG rifle is not very feminine in my opinion...she should stop at a .460 Weatherby Magnum.

Halliburton


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Joined: August 3rd, 2006, 4:53 am

May 11th, 2012, 6:13 pm #5



From time to time Everyone should squish some mudd between their toe's!!!!!!
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Joined: December 21st, 2008, 9:14 pm

May 11th, 2012, 8:50 pm #6

I've seen two of them. If I had about $2600 to throw around, the last one would have been mine.
An original Alexander Henry Tiger Gun in .450 Black Powder Express, rougly equalvalent to our .45-120 Sharps chambering
a fine late 19th century sporting rifle built for the India trade
Unless one is going with all out magnum handloads I have never seen reason to own modern .45 single shots where an original High Wall, Rolling Block or Henry will do the same job and likely only grow in value
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

May 11th, 2012, 10:29 pm #7


From time to time Everyone should squish some mudd between their toe's!!!!!!
In my day, (1930's & 1940's) Men's laughter was a resounding "HAR HAR", instead of today's watered-down snickers.

Today we don't even use robust laughs at all, and anyone who belts out a real manly laugh is looked upon with scorn!

Are we becoming emasculated? I sure as hell ain't!

Howl
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Joined: September 19th, 2010, 11:38 pm

May 12th, 2012, 12:13 am #8

Custom job would run around 2 grand yikes!

From time to time Everyone should squish some mudd between their toe's!!!!!!
I hunted it for a couple of years, and killed a spike and a cow elk with it, actually I found it a little light for the caliber with very hot loads.

I have also had two 45-100s or 45 2.6's. I had my own reamer for 45 2.6 and rechambered the 45-70's with the reamer and a "T" handle wrench, the differenct in chambers is only 1/2 inch so that you can get 20 grains or so more black powder in. I only used black powder in them and wanted the extra capasity to send 550 grain Hocke nose pour bullets to 1000 yards.

I hunted with them and competed in 1000 yard gong shooting. One was a Montana Shilo Sharps # 1 Sporting rifle that I won the SASS 1000 yard title at Horse Ridge outside of Bend Oregon with in either 1999 or 2000 and the other was this engraved Sharps Borschardt that I had made from a Military rifle by the masters of the day.

I had 5 K just in the rifle and the scope was another grand. I killed elk with both of those rifles and then gave the Borschardt to my son when he returned from Iraq.

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Last edited by unrepentantsinner on May 12th, 2012, 12:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 3rd, 2006, 4:53 am

May 12th, 2012, 3:08 am #9

An original Alexander Henry Tiger Gun in .450 Black Powder Express, rougly equalvalent to our .45-120 Sharps chambering
a fine late 19th century sporting rifle built for the India trade
Unless one is going with all out magnum handloads I have never seen reason to own modern .45 single shots where an original High Wall, Rolling Block or Henry will do the same job and likely only grow in value
what a rifle. Though time and funds and chance smiled upon you to allow you to get it. Not something that comes down the usual firearms trade routes these days. For many the No.1 fills marginally that desire for many to have a Classic-ish express, falling block rifle harkening back to the golden era of hunting the Tall grass.

From time to time Everyone should squish some mudd between their toe's!!!!!!
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Joined: December 21st, 2008, 9:14 pm

May 12th, 2012, 4:16 am #10

kinda one of my things
Double Rifles, Falling Blocks, even a few Lee Speeds
Henrys are usually awful expensive, lucked into this example just a shade over 3K...usual money on a Henry is the better part of 10K, usually more.

way I see it such things are a better investment than sticking that money in an IRA, muchless one of my money market accounts and I have the pleasure of ownersip.
same principle with most of my Air Gun investments
and neither are federally regulated items!
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