I'm running through every piece of equipment I've bought.

I'm running through every piece of equipment I've bought.

Joined: October 21st, 2001, 3:36 am

April 18th, 2012, 7:54 am #1

V blocks.

As a neophyte I think I have it figured out, and then when I try it the problems and questions start. Drilling a cylinder on TDC was an interesting problem, and then drilling it again at 90 degrees was a challenge. Sounds easy enough unless you want it done accurately. I searched around on the internet and Youtube and didn't find much about drilling on cylinders/tubes.

Got it done. More experience. Man, this thing better be quiet:


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Joined: September 21st, 2007, 12:13 pm

April 18th, 2012, 1:27 pm #2

found that the pair of 5c collet holders (1 hex, 1 square)that can be bought from Enco and others, work great.
Put the block in a vise, find the side, move to center and do whatever, then turn over 180deg's. These things are cheap I think I paid about $35.00 and they work on any size material that you can buy a 5c collet for.
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Joined: June 7th, 2010, 12:14 am

April 18th, 2012, 2:19 pm #3

As long as the part isn't for the a space ship,

After mounting the part as you show, chuck up a small end cutting mill.
Then bring the cutter over the spot you want the hole to be. Bring the cutter to just touch the work. now move away from the work in the in and out direction. This should leave a small flat, the width of the cutter, on the upper radius of the part.

Now for the indexing tip.

Without moving your set up, move the table so the cutter is off the work (to the right in your photo)
Lower the cutter until the cutting flutes are even with the SIDE of the work piece.
Move the table to bring the work up so a light cut can be taken from the horizontal radius at the location you want the second indexed hole. Similar to the flat you put on the top.

After this marking flat is made, raise the spindle, center the spindle over the first flat you had made on the work by whatever means you choose.(eye ball is good enough in most cases if the flat is kept small) Then mount the pilot drill, locate and drill your first hole doing any operations you want, such as final drill size or tapping etc. (ALL ON CENTER!)

Now, loosen the work clamps and rotate the part until the second milled flat is centered under the pilot drill. Repeat the hole forming operations as desired.

my 2 cents

cheers.
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Joined: August 22nd, 2001, 3:27 pm

April 18th, 2012, 2:56 pm #4

V blocks.

As a neophyte I think I have it figured out, and then when I try it the problems and questions start. Drilling a cylinder on TDC was an interesting problem, and then drilling it again at 90 degrees was a challenge. Sounds easy enough unless you want it done accurately. I searched around on the internet and Youtube and didn't find much about drilling on cylinders/tubes.

Got it done. More experience. Man, this thing better be quiet:


I also use the rotary table to lay out holes around the tube. You know about using an edge finder right? what it is and how to use it? Use the edge finder to locate the outer edge of the tube, move the the table an amount equal to the radius of the edge finder, set your zero and move the table in the radius of the tube, now you are over the exact center of the tube. Yeah, you'll get use to thinking about setups and what will clear and what won't, it looks like your moving right along.
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Joined: August 20th, 2006, 5:36 am

April 18th, 2012, 3:36 pm #5

V blocks.

As a neophyte I think I have it figured out, and then when I try it the problems and questions start. Drilling a cylinder on TDC was an interesting problem, and then drilling it again at 90 degrees was a challenge. Sounds easy enough unless you want it done accurately. I searched around on the internet and Youtube and didn't find much about drilling on cylinders/tubes.

Got it done. More experience. Man, this thing better be quiet:


Is what I do. And a nice bonus, they can also be used in the lathe. 5C collets go up to 1 1/8" IIRC, and are also available in square and hex, plus a bunch of other options as well. Edge finders are great, too, although I still have to keep reminding myself that it's .200", NOT .020" . And for those times when good enough is, one of those Y shaped center finders are quick and easy. BTW, I got my collet set and blocks from CDCO, price was considerably less than anywhere else I found, and the shipping was very quick, I think they went out the next business day. Later.

Dave
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Joined: October 21st, 2001, 3:36 am

April 18th, 2012, 4:57 pm #6

V blocks.

As a neophyte I think I have it figured out, and then when I try it the problems and questions start. Drilling a cylinder on TDC was an interesting problem, and then drilling it again at 90 degrees was a challenge. Sounds easy enough unless you want it done accurately. I searched around on the internet and Youtube and didn't find much about drilling on cylinders/tubes.

Got it done. More experience. Man, this thing better be quiet:


I used a combination square that has a cylinder center finder. I marked a centerline, rotated 90 degrees, using the marks on the square to verify location, then marked another set. I clamped it loosely in the v blocks and used a machinist square to verify the marks were perpendicular to the mill table. I used a dial indicator to find TDC, then divided the range of table movement that didn't move the dial indicator, in half. Rotate the tube 90 degrees and repeat.

The small mill didn't give me the range of table movement necessary to drill each end of the tube without unclamping and setting everything back up. It took a lot of time for such a minor operation. Crushing the tube when clamping is a concern too.



Last edited by bigbore on April 18th, 2012, 6:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 21st, 2001, 3:36 am

April 18th, 2012, 5:00 pm #7

As long as the part isn't for the a space ship,

After mounting the part as you show, chuck up a small end cutting mill.
Then bring the cutter over the spot you want the hole to be. Bring the cutter to just touch the work. now move away from the work in the in and out direction. This should leave a small flat, the width of the cutter, on the upper radius of the part.

Now for the indexing tip.

Without moving your set up, move the table so the cutter is off the work (to the right in your photo)
Lower the cutter until the cutting flutes are even with the SIDE of the work piece.
Move the table to bring the work up so a light cut can be taken from the horizontal radius at the location you want the second indexed hole. Similar to the flat you put on the top.

After this marking flat is made, raise the spindle, center the spindle over the first flat you had made on the work by whatever means you choose.(eye ball is good enough in most cases if the flat is kept small) Then mount the pilot drill, locate and drill your first hole doing any operations you want, such as final drill size or tapping etc. (ALL ON CENTER!)

Now, loosen the work clamps and rotate the part until the second milled flat is centered under the pilot drill. Repeat the hole forming operations as desired.

my 2 cents

cheers.
I'll probably try a version of this metthod eventually. Then, buy more tooling.

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Joined: October 21st, 2001, 3:36 am

April 18th, 2012, 5:06 pm #8

found that the pair of 5c collet holders (1 hex, 1 square)that can be bought from Enco and others, work great.
Put the block in a vise, find the side, move to center and do whatever, then turn over 180deg's. These things are cheap I think I paid about $35.00 and they work on any size material that you can buy a 5c collet for.
IIRC Pete aquired a lathe that used just collets for holding work. Too expensive for now although guns do use cylindrical stock predominantly. I'll have to buy another set of collets to give me the range up to just over 1".

Last edited by bigbore on April 18th, 2012, 5:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 21st, 2001, 3:36 am

April 18th, 2012, 5:16 pm #9

I also use the rotary table to lay out holes around the tube. You know about using an edge finder right? what it is and how to use it? Use the edge finder to locate the outer edge of the tube, move the the table an amount equal to the radius of the edge finder, set your zero and move the table in the radius of the tube, now you are over the exact center of the tube. Yeah, you'll get use to thinking about setups and what will clear and what won't, it looks like your moving right along.
and could have but the mill table is too short.

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Joined: October 21st, 2001, 3:36 am

April 18th, 2012, 6:12 pm #10

Is what I do. And a nice bonus, they can also be used in the lathe. 5C collets go up to 1 1/8" IIRC, and are also available in square and hex, plus a bunch of other options as well. Edge finders are great, too, although I still have to keep reminding myself that it's .200", NOT .020" . And for those times when good enough is, one of those Y shaped center finders are quick and easy. BTW, I got my collet set and blocks from CDCO, price was considerably less than anywhere else I found, and the shipping was very quick, I think they went out the next business day. Later.

Dave
2 blocks & 16 piece collet set up to 1 1/8".

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