How to apply waterlox to a gunstock

How to apply waterlox to a gunstock

Joined: December 5th, 2002, 11:21 pm

July 30th, 2006, 10:57 pm #1

How to apply waterlox to a gunstock

Waterlox is in my opinion the best of the oil finishes. It is easy to apply, waterproof, good looking and easy to repair. It is a tung oil/phenic resin mix that gives you the traditional oil look with superb water resistance that oils such as linseed oil, basic tung oil, RLO, and most other oils do not. It is even being used on the floors of the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC.


After prep sanding your stock (also can be applied over other oil finishes) brush on the Waterlox keeping the wood moist so that it soaks into the wood (Waterlox had the deepest penetration off all the wiping finishes as tested by Fine Woodworking). After about 5 min. wipe the oil off of the wood with a no lint cotton cloth wiping with the grain. On the first coat keep an eye out for "bleed out" which is when finish that was absorbed into the wood pores bleeds back out leaving little fisheyes around each pore. One reason for this can be putting the stock in sunlight or heat which expands air trapped in the wood and forces undried finish back out in front of it. It is also not recommended to "force" dry finishes by adding heat, UV light etc. If you do get some bleed out wipe them off with a cotton cloth dampened with some Waterlox oil. Let sit over night.

Next day you will find that it has dried and is ready for a little prep work
1. if there is fisheye bleed out steel wool them off with some 0000 steelwool.
2. give the entire piece a light steelwooling to get rid of any dust nibs or surface oddities
3. wipe it with a no lint cotton rag to get rid of any dust

Second coat can be applied the same as the first with a brush, let it sit on the stock for about 5 min. (moisten any dry spots that are drawing in finish) and then wipe off with a moistened (with Waterlox) cotton cloth. Let sit over night.

Prep if needed taking off any dust nibs with some steel wool.

For the 3rd coat you can wet sand with some 600grt. or better if you want during the application of the coat of oil and skim wipe it just as you would with other oils to fill the pores but in this write up it will not be covered/only the basic coating will.

Continue with other coats but instead of brushing it on, just wipe it on with a moistened cloth (moistened with Waterlox) till it has a "SHINE" look. This way a thin layer will be evenly applied without leaving lap marks. Say every 3 coats give a light steelwooling if needed.

I like to use the gloss even when a satin finish is wanted. to get the satin finish on a gloss steelwool (after waiting 7 days for full hardness) the stock with the grain with some good 0000 steelwool. I do not like the synthetic pads which are impregnated with grit and give a diff. look. If you want a semi satin finish rub the steelwool pad in some Kiwi Shoe wax of matching color to the stock and then rub out. The wax lubes the steelwood and reduces it's cutting action giving a semi satin finish.


It is an easy finish that gives great results. Here is there web site and a few pictures of some harsh uses of waterlox.

https://www.waterlox.com/default.aspx


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Joined: February 14th, 2005, 1:56 am

July 31st, 2006, 1:19 am #2

nt
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Joined: December 11th, 2004, 8:29 pm

July 31st, 2006, 1:24 am #3

How to apply waterlox to a gunstock

Waterlox is in my opinion the best of the oil finishes. It is easy to apply, waterproof, good looking and easy to repair. It is a tung oil/phenic resin mix that gives you the traditional oil look with superb water resistance that oils such as linseed oil, basic tung oil, RLO, and most other oils do not. It is even being used on the floors of the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC.


After prep sanding your stock (also can be applied over other oil finishes) brush on the Waterlox keeping the wood moist so that it soaks into the wood (Waterlox had the deepest penetration off all the wiping finishes as tested by Fine Woodworking). After about 5 min. wipe the oil off of the wood with a no lint cotton cloth wiping with the grain. On the first coat keep an eye out for "bleed out" which is when finish that was absorbed into the wood pores bleeds back out leaving little fisheyes around each pore. One reason for this can be putting the stock in sunlight or heat which expands air trapped in the wood and forces undried finish back out in front of it. It is also not recommended to "force" dry finishes by adding heat, UV light etc. If you do get some bleed out wipe them off with a cotton cloth dampened with some Waterlox oil. Let sit over night.

Next day you will find that it has dried and is ready for a little prep work
1. if there is fisheye bleed out steel wool them off with some 0000 steelwool.
2. give the entire piece a light steelwooling to get rid of any dust nibs or surface oddities
3. wipe it with a no lint cotton rag to get rid of any dust

Second coat can be applied the same as the first with a brush, let it sit on the stock for about 5 min. (moisten any dry spots that are drawing in finish) and then wipe off with a moistened (with Waterlox) cotton cloth. Let sit over night.

Prep if needed taking off any dust nibs with some steel wool.

For the 3rd coat you can wet sand with some 600grt. or better if you want during the application of the coat of oil and skim wipe it just as you would with other oils to fill the pores but in this write up it will not be covered/only the basic coating will.

Continue with other coats but instead of brushing it on, just wipe it on with a moistened cloth (moistened with Waterlox) till it has a "SHINE" look. This way a thin layer will be evenly applied without leaving lap marks. Say every 3 coats give a light steelwooling if needed.

I like to use the gloss even when a satin finish is wanted. to get the satin finish on a gloss steelwool (after waiting 7 days for full hardness) the stock with the grain with some good 0000 steelwool. I do not like the synthetic pads which are impregnated with grit and give a diff. look. If you want a semi satin finish rub the steelwool pad in some Kiwi Shoe wax of matching color to the stock and then rub out. The wax lubes the steelwood and reduces it's cutting action giving a semi satin finish.


It is an easy finish that gives great results. Here is there web site and a few pictures of some harsh uses of waterlox.

https://www.waterlox.com/default.aspx


I use it for all Clear finish. I can't find it local. I get in TN. when i visit. It's been on the Market many years, used to be the top of the line for Floors.
Doug S.
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 4:25 am

July 31st, 2006, 2:50 am #4


www.woodcraft.com under the oil finishes. My favorite also.
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Joined: December 5th, 2002, 11:21 pm

July 31st, 2006, 3:53 am #5

nt
Ace Hardware carries it as well. You can also order it.

Last yr. you could also get little sample packets of it from the Company, I think that they discontinued the free samples.
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Joined: July 20th, 2005, 1:28 pm

July 31st, 2006, 6:21 pm #6

How to apply waterlox to a gunstock

Waterlox is in my opinion the best of the oil finishes. It is easy to apply, waterproof, good looking and easy to repair. It is a tung oil/phenic resin mix that gives you the traditional oil look with superb water resistance that oils such as linseed oil, basic tung oil, RLO, and most other oils do not. It is even being used on the floors of the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC.


After prep sanding your stock (also can be applied over other oil finishes) brush on the Waterlox keeping the wood moist so that it soaks into the wood (Waterlox had the deepest penetration off all the wiping finishes as tested by Fine Woodworking). After about 5 min. wipe the oil off of the wood with a no lint cotton cloth wiping with the grain. On the first coat keep an eye out for "bleed out" which is when finish that was absorbed into the wood pores bleeds back out leaving little fisheyes around each pore. One reason for this can be putting the stock in sunlight or heat which expands air trapped in the wood and forces undried finish back out in front of it. It is also not recommended to "force" dry finishes by adding heat, UV light etc. If you do get some bleed out wipe them off with a cotton cloth dampened with some Waterlox oil. Let sit over night.

Next day you will find that it has dried and is ready for a little prep work
1. if there is fisheye bleed out steel wool them off with some 0000 steelwool.
2. give the entire piece a light steelwooling to get rid of any dust nibs or surface oddities
3. wipe it with a no lint cotton rag to get rid of any dust

Second coat can be applied the same as the first with a brush, let it sit on the stock for about 5 min. (moisten any dry spots that are drawing in finish) and then wipe off with a moistened (with Waterlox) cotton cloth. Let sit over night.

Prep if needed taking off any dust nibs with some steel wool.

For the 3rd coat you can wet sand with some 600grt. or better if you want during the application of the coat of oil and skim wipe it just as you would with other oils to fill the pores but in this write up it will not be covered/only the basic coating will.

Continue with other coats but instead of brushing it on, just wipe it on with a moistened cloth (moistened with Waterlox) till it has a "SHINE" look. This way a thin layer will be evenly applied without leaving lap marks. Say every 3 coats give a light steelwooling if needed.

I like to use the gloss even when a satin finish is wanted. to get the satin finish on a gloss steelwool (after waiting 7 days for full hardness) the stock with the grain with some good 0000 steelwool. I do not like the synthetic pads which are impregnated with grit and give a diff. look. If you want a semi satin finish rub the steelwool pad in some Kiwi Shoe wax of matching color to the stock and then rub out. The wax lubes the steelwood and reduces it's cutting action giving a semi satin finish.


It is an easy finish that gives great results. Here is there web site and a few pictures of some harsh uses of waterlox.

https://www.waterlox.com/default.aspx


Live in a 200+ yr old house on the NHR and used waterlox on all the floors. Great product. Recommended by the professional restorers who did the work.
Agree entirely with your refinishing methods. The real secret with any finish is to let it dry completely between coats. I wait until the smell of the carriers goes away. At least 48 hours. The wait is worth it.
FYI - there is also a Marine grade of waterlox for exterior or hard use applications.
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Joined: March 28th, 2002, 6:54 pm

April 12th, 2009, 4:44 am #7

How to apply waterlox to a gunstock

Waterlox is in my opinion the best of the oil finishes. It is easy to apply, waterproof, good looking and easy to repair. It is a tung oil/phenic resin mix that gives you the traditional oil look with superb water resistance that oils such as linseed oil, basic tung oil, RLO, and most other oils do not. It is even being used on the floors of the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC.


After prep sanding your stock (also can be applied over other oil finishes) brush on the Waterlox keeping the wood moist so that it soaks into the wood (Waterlox had the deepest penetration off all the wiping finishes as tested by Fine Woodworking). After about 5 min. wipe the oil off of the wood with a no lint cotton cloth wiping with the grain. On the first coat keep an eye out for "bleed out" which is when finish that was absorbed into the wood pores bleeds back out leaving little fisheyes around each pore. One reason for this can be putting the stock in sunlight or heat which expands air trapped in the wood and forces undried finish back out in front of it. It is also not recommended to "force" dry finishes by adding heat, UV light etc. If you do get some bleed out wipe them off with a cotton cloth dampened with some Waterlox oil. Let sit over night.

Next day you will find that it has dried and is ready for a little prep work
1. if there is fisheye bleed out steel wool them off with some 0000 steelwool.
2. give the entire piece a light steelwooling to get rid of any dust nibs or surface oddities
3. wipe it with a no lint cotton rag to get rid of any dust

Second coat can be applied the same as the first with a brush, let it sit on the stock for about 5 min. (moisten any dry spots that are drawing in finish) and then wipe off with a moistened (with Waterlox) cotton cloth. Let sit over night.

Prep if needed taking off any dust nibs with some steel wool.

For the 3rd coat you can wet sand with some 600grt. or better if you want during the application of the coat of oil and skim wipe it just as you would with other oils to fill the pores but in this write up it will not be covered/only the basic coating will.

Continue with other coats but instead of brushing it on, just wipe it on with a moistened cloth (moistened with Waterlox) till it has a "SHINE" look. This way a thin layer will be evenly applied without leaving lap marks. Say every 3 coats give a light steelwooling if needed.

I like to use the gloss even when a satin finish is wanted. to get the satin finish on a gloss steelwool (after waiting 7 days for full hardness) the stock with the grain with some good 0000 steelwool. I do not like the synthetic pads which are impregnated with grit and give a diff. look. If you want a semi satin finish rub the steelwool pad in some Kiwi Shoe wax of matching color to the stock and then rub out. The wax lubes the steelwood and reduces it's cutting action giving a semi satin finish.


It is an easy finish that gives great results. Here is there web site and a few pictures of some harsh uses of waterlox.

https://www.waterlox.com/default.aspx


between coats.Grey scotchbrite doesn't shed,and has a more consistent cut.I'd wet sand using the oil of your choice during the first few coats,using a padded block and 320-400 paper.Nothing ruins a great finish like pores and ripples.
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