How I would have saved Titanic's Passengers and Crew, and possibly the ship too!

How I would have saved Titanic's Passengers and Crew, and possibly the ship too!

Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

April 15th, 2012, 7:11 pm #1


First off, lookout Frederick Fleet, up in the crow's nest of Titanic's foremast, was not issued binoculars! It was a dark, moonless night, and the sea was as calm as glass, with no telltale waves breaking along the base of the Iceberg. Fleet was the "eyes" of the ship, as this was way before radar came along!

This made it hard to detect the berg until Titanic was only about 500 yards away.

A pair of 7X50 Marine binoculars would have detected the berg 7 times father away at about 2 miles, and the binocular's greater light-gathering ability would have made the image much more visible, thereby enabling Titanic to casually make a slight course correction, with no need to reduce her speed of 22.5 knots, and certainly no need to reverse her engines!

Now, a ship's rudder works most efficiently when there is an unobstructed flow of water running rapidly over its surfaces.

First Officer Murdoch, upon receiving Fleet's telephone warning of "Iceberg Right Ahead", did what he was trained to do in the event of an imminent collision: He closed the watertight doors throughout the ship's 16 compartments, ordered the helm "hard over", and
ordered the engines reversed.

So what happens when a ship is travelling at nearly its top speed and the engines are suddenly reversed?

TURBULENCE!

The rudder's smooth flow is interrupted, killing its effectiveness and reducing its ability to react to Murdoch's
"hard over" command!

This is why Fleet didn't see Titanic begin to turn until it was almost on the iceberg, which was then too late!

So much for "hard over" and "reverse engines"!

And now about closing the watertight doors:

By closing the watertight doors (which Murdoch was trained to do when a collision was imminent), the inflow of water through Titanic's ruptured hull was forced to flood ONLY the damaged forward one-third of the ship, leaving the other ten compartments dry.

As the forward part of the ship took on more and more water, the bow sank lower and lower to where more openings became available to accelerate the flooding, such as the anchor chain hawseholes, the forward mail hatch, and the spiral staircases leading from the foredeck to the ship's bottom, which was a passage for the stokers.

By leaving the watertight doors OPEN, the flooding would have progressed thoughout Titanic's entire length, allowing her to settle on an even keel, which would have given her 7 to 8 hours to founder, instead of the 2 hours and 40 minutes that she lasted.

This would have given Carpathia plenty of time to reach Titanic, with enough time for 3 trips with the 20 lifeboats between the ships to transfer all 2300 people to safety!

That's how I see it!

Hal




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Joined: December 25th, 2009, 8:47 pm

April 15th, 2012, 8:05 pm #2

this very same subject.
All the binoculars aboard ship were locked up. The ship's officer with the keys, David Blair,
was bumped from the ships crew before it sailed.
Guess the Captain didn't have any spare keys.



Head Gopher and Assistant
Match Director Ashland Air Rifle Range
Ashland OR

Regards,


Mark Gravelle
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

April 15th, 2012, 8:12 pm #3


That wasn't being very considerate to over 1500 persons.

Hal
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Joined: March 17th, 2006, 3:32 pm

April 15th, 2012, 9:30 pm #4

this very same subject.
All the binoculars aboard ship were locked up. The ship's officer with the keys, David Blair,
was bumped from the ships crew before it sailed.
Guess the Captain didn't have any spare keys.



Head Gopher and Assistant
Match Director Ashland Air Rifle Range
Ashland OR

Regards,


Mark Gravelle
That big of a ship and couldn't anyone just break them locks?

Sick 'em Hoff!!!

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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

April 15th, 2012, 9:44 pm #5

First off, lookout Frederick Fleet, up in the crow's nest of Titanic's foremast, was not issued binoculars! It was a dark, moonless night, and the sea was as calm as glass, with no telltale waves breaking along the base of the Iceberg. Fleet was the "eyes" of the ship, as this was way before radar came along!

This made it hard to detect the berg until Titanic was only about 500 yards away.

A pair of 7X50 Marine binoculars would have detected the berg 7 times father away at about 2 miles, and the binocular's greater light-gathering ability would have made the image much more visible, thereby enabling Titanic to casually make a slight course correction, with no need to reduce her speed of 22.5 knots, and certainly no need to reverse her engines!

Now, a ship's rudder works most efficiently when there is an unobstructed flow of water running rapidly over its surfaces.

First Officer Murdoch, upon receiving Fleet's telephone warning of "Iceberg Right Ahead", did what he was trained to do in the event of an imminent collision: He closed the watertight doors throughout the ship's 16 compartments, ordered the helm "hard over", and
ordered the engines reversed.

So what happens when a ship is travelling at nearly its top speed and the engines are suddenly reversed?

TURBULENCE!

The rudder's smooth flow is interrupted, killing its effectiveness and reducing its ability to react to Murdoch's
"hard over" command!

This is why Fleet didn't see Titanic begin to turn until it was almost on the iceberg, which was then too late!

So much for "hard over" and "reverse engines"!

And now about closing the watertight doors:

By closing the watertight doors (which Murdoch was trained to do when a collision was imminent), the inflow of water through Titanic's ruptured hull was forced to flood ONLY the damaged forward one-third of the ship, leaving the other ten compartments dry.

As the forward part of the ship took on more and more water, the bow sank lower and lower to where more openings became available to accelerate the flooding, such as the anchor chain hawseholes, the forward mail hatch, and the spiral staircases leading from the foredeck to the ship's bottom, which was a passage for the stokers.

By leaving the watertight doors OPEN, the flooding would have progressed thoughout Titanic's entire length, allowing her to settle on an even keel, which would have given her 7 to 8 hours to founder, instead of the 2 hours and 40 minutes that she lasted.

This would have given Carpathia plenty of time to reach Titanic, with enough time for 3 trips with the 20 lifeboats between the ships to transfer all 2300 people to safety!

That's how I see it!

Hal



...they certainly could have re-opened them at any time after the extent of the damage and the inevitablility of sinking was known, even though doing so would have probably flooded the remaining boiler and generator rooms, costing the loss of pumps and electricity.

Good plan, Hal. You can sail my ship, anyday!

Steve
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Joined: October 10th, 2003, 5:24 am

April 15th, 2012, 10:05 pm #6

First off, lookout Frederick Fleet, up in the crow's nest of Titanic's foremast, was not issued binoculars! It was a dark, moonless night, and the sea was as calm as glass, with no telltale waves breaking along the base of the Iceberg. Fleet was the "eyes" of the ship, as this was way before radar came along!

This made it hard to detect the berg until Titanic was only about 500 yards away.

A pair of 7X50 Marine binoculars would have detected the berg 7 times father away at about 2 miles, and the binocular's greater light-gathering ability would have made the image much more visible, thereby enabling Titanic to casually make a slight course correction, with no need to reduce her speed of 22.5 knots, and certainly no need to reverse her engines!

Now, a ship's rudder works most efficiently when there is an unobstructed flow of water running rapidly over its surfaces.

First Officer Murdoch, upon receiving Fleet's telephone warning of "Iceberg Right Ahead", did what he was trained to do in the event of an imminent collision: He closed the watertight doors throughout the ship's 16 compartments, ordered the helm "hard over", and
ordered the engines reversed.

So what happens when a ship is travelling at nearly its top speed and the engines are suddenly reversed?

TURBULENCE!

The rudder's smooth flow is interrupted, killing its effectiveness and reducing its ability to react to Murdoch's
"hard over" command!

This is why Fleet didn't see Titanic begin to turn until it was almost on the iceberg, which was then too late!

So much for "hard over" and "reverse engines"!

And now about closing the watertight doors:

By closing the watertight doors (which Murdoch was trained to do when a collision was imminent), the inflow of water through Titanic's ruptured hull was forced to flood ONLY the damaged forward one-third of the ship, leaving the other ten compartments dry.

As the forward part of the ship took on more and more water, the bow sank lower and lower to where more openings became available to accelerate the flooding, such as the anchor chain hawseholes, the forward mail hatch, and the spiral staircases leading from the foredeck to the ship's bottom, which was a passage for the stokers.

By leaving the watertight doors OPEN, the flooding would have progressed thoughout Titanic's entire length, allowing her to settle on an even keel, which would have given her 7 to 8 hours to founder, instead of the 2 hours and 40 minutes that she lasted.

This would have given Carpathia plenty of time to reach Titanic, with enough time for 3 trips with the 20 lifeboats between the ships to transfer all 2300 people to safety!

That's how I see it!

Hal



I did see about that key to the binocular locker which was left ashore. But, c'mon, the ship had only ONE pair of binoculars? Don't blame the loss of a key on this oversight. They surely MUST have had at least ONE other pair somewhere. My bet is it was draped around an officer's neck. Back then glasses were expensive items. Maybe a deck officer was loathe to lend his to the watch?

Regarding closing of the doors and shifting of ballast, you would have to be very well trained and rehearsed in such a maneuver. I'm not sure what kind of communications were available on the Titanic such as sound powered phones and who was detailed as damage control crews. When I was aboard my old sub, we practiced damage control religiously (it being of paramount importance on that kind of vessel). We even had flooding simulators with all kinds of leaks to secure with our equipment. Men were trained to know how to respond, where the damage control kits were located, etc. Try working in flooding compartments where the water temperature is lethal and the lights are out. That would be about like a submarine's situation where there is zero time to spare or ponder solutions.

As to helm control, the main idea of emergency astern is to slow the progress of the ship. If she had been given a lighter order for less reverse thrust, Titanic might still have lacked sufficient time to perform a course correction since she would have been closing the gap faster. The main issue seems to be the long gash down her hull which buckled and popped plates. It has been speculated that Titanic would have been better off ramming head on but that's an opinion given from the arm chair and not the captain's seat. The biggest issue remains the life boats. Had she been outfitted with a decent number, I doubt too many lives would have been lost.
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

April 15th, 2012, 10:44 pm #7

...they certainly could have re-opened them at any time after the extent of the damage and the inevitablility of sinking was known, even though doing so would have probably flooded the remaining boiler and generator rooms, costing the loss of pumps and electricity.

Good plan, Hal. You can sail my ship, anyday!

Steve
...the ship's 4 main 400KW generators, located aft of the 2 engine rooms in compartment 13, killing the power for all auxiliaries, but it would have (theoretically) kept Titanic afloat for 7 to 8 hours.

As long as the ship was being allowed to flood throughout on an even keel, pumps would not have been necessary, and the 2300 souls on board would just have to wait in the dark for Carpathia to arrive to save their lives.

Incidentally, Titanic's power was 100 volts DC at 16,000 amps...no alternating current was generated.

Hal
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

April 15th, 2012, 11:14 pm #8

I did see about that key to the binocular locker which was left ashore. But, c'mon, the ship had only ONE pair of binoculars? Don't blame the loss of a key on this oversight. They surely MUST have had at least ONE other pair somewhere. My bet is it was draped around an officer's neck. Back then glasses were expensive items. Maybe a deck officer was loathe to lend his to the watch?

Regarding closing of the doors and shifting of ballast, you would have to be very well trained and rehearsed in such a maneuver. I'm not sure what kind of communications were available on the Titanic such as sound powered phones and who was detailed as damage control crews. When I was aboard my old sub, we practiced damage control religiously (it being of paramount importance on that kind of vessel). We even had flooding simulators with all kinds of leaks to secure with our equipment. Men were trained to know how to respond, where the damage control kits were located, etc. Try working in flooding compartments where the water temperature is lethal and the lights are out. That would be about like a submarine's situation where there is zero time to spare or ponder solutions.

As to helm control, the main idea of emergency astern is to slow the progress of the ship. If she had been given a lighter order for less reverse thrust, Titanic might still have lacked sufficient time to perform a course correction since she would have been closing the gap faster. The main issue seems to be the long gash down her hull which buckled and popped plates. It has been speculated that Titanic would have been better off ramming head on but that's an opinion given from the arm chair and not the captain's seat. The biggest issue remains the life boats. Had she been outfitted with a decent number, I doubt too many lives would have been lost.
.....1st Officer Murdoch didn't have the time or the luxury of considering alternatives regarding the "best" way to handle the situation...he had to act...NOW!

It's easy for me, 100 years later, to critique the decisions made on that night, because I wasn't there and under that pressure.

Murdoch did what he was trained to do in such an emergency, and I certainly can't fault his actions! Captain Smith or 2nd Officer Lightoller would have made the same decisions.

Even builder Thomas Andrews assured Captain Smith that Titanic was doomed, since so much water had entered the ship's forward section. Re-Opening the watertight doors wouldn't have caused the ship to settle on an even keel...it was just too late for that!

I must admire the courage of Bandmaster Wallace Hartley, while he and his musicians were playing "Nearer My God To Thee" as Titanic was beginnng her final death throes. The band perished among the 1500 others.

Hal


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Joined: December 3rd, 2005, 3:06 pm

April 16th, 2012, 12:55 am #9

First off, lookout Frederick Fleet, up in the crow's nest of Titanic's foremast, was not issued binoculars! It was a dark, moonless night, and the sea was as calm as glass, with no telltale waves breaking along the base of the Iceberg. Fleet was the "eyes" of the ship, as this was way before radar came along!

This made it hard to detect the berg until Titanic was only about 500 yards away.

A pair of 7X50 Marine binoculars would have detected the berg 7 times father away at about 2 miles, and the binocular's greater light-gathering ability would have made the image much more visible, thereby enabling Titanic to casually make a slight course correction, with no need to reduce her speed of 22.5 knots, and certainly no need to reverse her engines!

Now, a ship's rudder works most efficiently when there is an unobstructed flow of water running rapidly over its surfaces.

First Officer Murdoch, upon receiving Fleet's telephone warning of "Iceberg Right Ahead", did what he was trained to do in the event of an imminent collision: He closed the watertight doors throughout the ship's 16 compartments, ordered the helm "hard over", and
ordered the engines reversed.

So what happens when a ship is travelling at nearly its top speed and the engines are suddenly reversed?

TURBULENCE!

The rudder's smooth flow is interrupted, killing its effectiveness and reducing its ability to react to Murdoch's
"hard over" command!

This is why Fleet didn't see Titanic begin to turn until it was almost on the iceberg, which was then too late!

So much for "hard over" and "reverse engines"!

And now about closing the watertight doors:

By closing the watertight doors (which Murdoch was trained to do when a collision was imminent), the inflow of water through Titanic's ruptured hull was forced to flood ONLY the damaged forward one-third of the ship, leaving the other ten compartments dry.

As the forward part of the ship took on more and more water, the bow sank lower and lower to where more openings became available to accelerate the flooding, such as the anchor chain hawseholes, the forward mail hatch, and the spiral staircases leading from the foredeck to the ship's bottom, which was a passage for the stokers.

By leaving the watertight doors OPEN, the flooding would have progressed thoughout Titanic's entire length, allowing her to settle on an even keel, which would have given her 7 to 8 hours to founder, instead of the 2 hours and 40 minutes that she lasted.

This would have given Carpathia plenty of time to reach Titanic, with enough time for 3 trips with the 20 lifeboats between the ships to transfer all 2300 people to safety!

That's how I see it!

Hal



http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2012/04/ ... p=features
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

April 16th, 2012, 1:56 am #10


Even the CD player couldn't have been saved.

Howl
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