How crosmans new turbo aire pump works

How crosmans new turbo aire pump works

Joined: January 30th, 2009, 3:46 am

February 13th, 2012, 8:53 pm #1

Saw this on facebook today. http://www.crosman.com/croswords/?p=2420
Last edited by crowpopper on February 13th, 2012, 8:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 8th, 2009, 1:53 am

February 13th, 2012, 9:14 pm #2

n/t
Last edited by LexingtonGreg on February 13th, 2012, 9:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 14th, 2008, 1:46 am

February 13th, 2012, 9:21 pm #3

Saw this on facebook today. http://www.crosman.com/croswords/?p=2420
to see how this pump performs in actual use.
Also, how well it holds up.
Any improvement in hand pumps will be a good thing.

boo
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Joined: April 28th, 2010, 12:23 am

February 13th, 2012, 9:33 pm #4

but at 300 msrp what will the actual retail be>?


<span style="font-family:Verdana;font-size:14px;font-style:italic;font-weight:bold;text-decoration:underline;text-transform:none;color:#000000;">"i never was much for book learnin"</span>
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Joined: June 14th, 2007, 7:51 pm

February 13th, 2012, 10:03 pm #5

well something like that,or was that one of US?
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Joined: April 1st, 2009, 3:18 am

February 13th, 2012, 11:03 pm #6

Saw this on facebook today. http://www.crosman.com/croswords/?p=2420
"The majority of things in our lives are created by folks no smarter than the rest. Afterall, the world is comprised, and operated by C average people intellctually, academically, and morally. These people are often the great pioneers that set the precedent for what excellence should be."
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Joined: March 22nd, 2006, 5:11 am

February 13th, 2012, 11:24 pm #7

Saw this on facebook today. http://www.crosman.com/croswords/?p=2420
Not the force/stroke curve, I get that and good for them, it's a very novel idea. The BS is:

"Finally, the Turbo Aire pump generates less heat than the competitive pumps. There are three primary reasons:

- Slower compression rate at the end of the stroke
- Thick, aluminum cylinder required to withstand the 3,000 psi pressure absorbs the heat
- No interconnected stages that preheat the air and transfer the heat to the next stage

The evidence of these improvements can be demonstrated by simply pumping up an airgun. The Turbo Aire can charge an air rifle from 0 to 3,000 psi without resting and the cylinder and base are only mildly warmer afterwards. Competitive pumps actually have a warning to stop pumping after 10 minutes to let the pump cool down before resuming pumping or risk damaging the seals. The base of these pumps becomes excessive hot during operation. By the way, all that heat generated is wasted energy you are expending that is not being used to pressurize your airgun! The Turbo Aire is more thermodynamically efficient."

Not even the great Crosman gods can change the laws of thermodynamics. The same amount of air compressed the same amount heats the same way. The fact that their pump has a "thick aluminum cylinder" and gets only "mildly warmer" in no way indicates that the temperature of the air is less, only that the heatsink used to cool the air is better. That does not equate to "more thermodynamically efficient" A previous statement in the article "The work done is actually the same between the two pumps (area under the curves)" so unless it takes less strokes for the same end result, there is no efficiency gain and I don't see that claim anywhere.

Knock it off Crosman, there's no need to embellish the trugh. The pump is a good idea, it's much like the leverage of the side-pump on the Indy which increases as the pump nears the end of the stroke resulting in a decrease in force even as the pressure is increasing. Make that point and let it be.

-Scot
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Joined: March 22nd, 2006, 5:11 am

February 13th, 2012, 11:27 pm #8

well something like that,or was that one of US?
I think you're mixing Archimedes and Patrick Henry.

-Scot
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Joined: October 28th, 2010, 1:01 am

February 13th, 2012, 11:53 pm #9

Not the force/stroke curve, I get that and good for them, it's a very novel idea. The BS is:

"Finally, the Turbo Aire pump generates less heat than the competitive pumps. There are three primary reasons:

- Slower compression rate at the end of the stroke
- Thick, aluminum cylinder required to withstand the 3,000 psi pressure absorbs the heat
- No interconnected stages that preheat the air and transfer the heat to the next stage

The evidence of these improvements can be demonstrated by simply pumping up an airgun. The Turbo Aire can charge an air rifle from 0 to 3,000 psi without resting and the cylinder and base are only mildly warmer afterwards. Competitive pumps actually have a warning to stop pumping after 10 minutes to let the pump cool down before resuming pumping or risk damaging the seals. The base of these pumps becomes excessive hot during operation. By the way, all that heat generated is wasted energy you are expending that is not being used to pressurize your airgun! The Turbo Aire is more thermodynamically efficient."

Not even the great Crosman gods can change the laws of thermodynamics. The same amount of air compressed the same amount heats the same way. The fact that their pump has a "thick aluminum cylinder" and gets only "mildly warmer" in no way indicates that the temperature of the air is less, only that the heatsink used to cool the air is better. That does not equate to "more thermodynamically efficient" A previous statement in the article "The work done is actually the same between the two pumps (area under the curves)" so unless it takes less strokes for the same end result, there is no efficiency gain and I don't see that claim anywhere.

Knock it off Crosman, there's no need to embellish the trugh. The pump is a good idea, it's much like the leverage of the side-pump on the Indy which increases as the pump nears the end of the stroke resulting in a decrease in force even as the pressure is increasing. Make that point and let it be.

-Scot
a bar against all information which is proof against all arguments and which
cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance.That principle is contempt
prior to investigation.Am looking forward to its release.
Looking forward to trying one.Wonder what rebuilding it would be like?

mark in mass
Last edited by mark6869 on February 14th, 2012, 12:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 25th, 2003, 11:44 pm

February 14th, 2012, 12:05 am #10

Saw this on facebook today. http://www.crosman.com/croswords/?p=2420
"The work done is actually the same between the two pumps (area under the curves)"

If the area under those two curves shown is the same I'll eat my Excalibre.

Point 2: The Crosman turbo shows force "on the handle" in excess of 100 lb from 11 to 18 inches of travel - the generic pump just 2" from 20" to 21". The latter comes at the ideal point to "drop your weight" on the handle. With the turbo it comes when the biomechanics of arm trunk and legs relationships make it more difficult ( especially for Tony )through the middle of the stroke.

Force of 50 + lb needed from 7" to 20" with the turbo; just from 18" to 21" with the generic pump example. Again the latter at the ideal "drop the weight" position.

Point 3: I'll stop here: Crosman is suggesting / implying one needs to be 200 lb heavy to pump 3000 psi. I've got news ( and so have many of you ). I presently weigh 160 lb and am 75 yrs by the end of the month and have no difficulty habitually pumping an FX pump to 4,350 psi. It's how you pump that counts - you must have heard that before ............. Kind regards, Yrrah.

Last edited by Yrrah on February 14th, 2012, 12:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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