Help with Trigger Adjustment on the Shadow

Help with Trigger Adjustment on the Shadow

Joined: March 19th, 2006, 8:49 am

September 14th, 2006, 10:12 pm #1

I'm thinking of adusting the trigger but in the Manual it says (Rotate screw clockwise for reduction and counter-clockwise for increase. OK what is increasing and decreasing. I want to try it out first before I let my son shoot his gun.
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Joined: October 21st, 2001, 3:36 am

September 14th, 2006, 10:16 pm #2

is what your adjusting. Be careful, it can make the gun unsafe.

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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

September 14th, 2006, 10:21 pm #3

I'm thinking of adusting the trigger but in the Manual it says (Rotate screw clockwise for reduction and counter-clockwise for increase. OK what is increasing and decreasing. I want to try it out first before I let my son shoot his gun.
...the "2nd stage" of the Gamo fake 2-stage trigger. If you try to set creep to zero with this trigger, the gun WILL misfire.

Here's why: http://www.network54.com/Forum/79537/me ... %26quot%3B...


Steve
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Joined: March 19th, 2006, 8:49 am

September 14th, 2006, 10:27 pm #4

nt
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Joined: February 14th, 2006, 4:12 pm

September 15th, 2006, 2:37 am #5

drop in like this:

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Joined: October 10th, 2003, 5:24 am

September 15th, 2006, 4:38 am #6

...the "2nd stage" of the Gamo fake 2-stage trigger. If you try to set creep to zero with this trigger, the gun WILL misfire.

Here's why: http://www.network54.com/Forum/79537/me ... %26quot%3B...


Steve
Steve, by that I mean does the Gamo screw allow it to be set too light or is there a limit in the adjustment? I would think that, knowing most of Gamo's market, they would want to be on the safe side.

What, me worry???
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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

September 15th, 2006, 4:59 am #7

Adjusting the Gamo screw does almost nothing to lighten the trigger, but only reduces the fraction of the blade's movement that's actually moving the sear.

Most of the travel of the Gamo trigger blade is just wasted motion, because the blade isn't even touching the sear. The adjustment screw moves the cocked position of the sear closer and closer to break and further and further from rest position of the trigger.

This writeup by Jim P. really explains it pretty well, if read carefully.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/79537/me ... %26quot%3B

Steve
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Joined: October 10th, 2003, 5:24 am

September 15th, 2006, 1:20 pm #8

Plus saw a post where it showed the "first stage" as two bars sliding horizontally until the end is reached and the sear trips. (Or something to that effect.) I guess the adjustment screw is shortening this horizontal stroke. The post you referenced cautioned against setting a knife edge engagement for two reasons: first, an unsafe sear engagement due to bumping and, second, premature wear on the sear. I'm familiar with the first concept with firearms and give any gun with a light trigger the bump test to see if it will trip. Even had one I bought go straight to the 'smith to correct same. What worries me a bit is the second warning about sear wear. These parts should be sufficiently hardened to resist rounding. What is the difference between "tripping" the sear from normal pulls and a knife-edge setting? I will take it on faith that a safe "hair" or "target" trigger is not achievable with this system. That said, I still ask if the original Gamo travel adjustment screw will allow you to go dangerously close to a knife edge setting? I should think it's engineered with some safety margin in place.

ps - This relates to sear wear, in general. One thing that really gets me is the number of people who think nothing of daubing their trigger surfaces with moly pastes, et cetera. Most gunsmithing manuals warn against this due to the dust-gathering effects of sticky solutions which, over time, can cause them to become abrasive to the point of wearing key surfaces. See it all the time on rimfires, too. If it's a true statement, then I would think that it's even more of a no-no in a system like Gamo's. Personally, if I feel the need to reduce trigger friction through application of a lube, I opt for one of the dry kits from Brownell's.

What, me worry???
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Joined: May 12th, 2001, 1:29 pm

September 15th, 2006, 2:16 pm #9

...trigger adjuster screw except remove it. So I don't know if the stock screw being shipped with current production Gamos is long enough to get an overenthusiastic trigger twiddler into trouble.

But if it's too short to be dangerous, then it' also too short to make much difference in the trigger's feel. Then the temptation to replace it with a longer - and problematic - one is obvious.

Back when I was twiddling the stock adjustment on B18s, however, the stock screw was definitely long enough to cause all manner of mischief, and I was routinely setting my triggers to the brink of disaster - until I read Jim's article.

Meanwhile, in my experience, lubrication prettymuch always reduces wear compared to dry metal contact. Most dust is soft organic material and not abrasive - especially when greasy .

If you happen to get your action full of grit, of course, then you have a different problem - that requires prompt attention.

Steve
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Joined: October 10th, 2003, 5:24 am

September 15th, 2006, 2:28 pm #10

I guess that is the determining factor. Some of the cheaper, old .22's had surface-hardened sears and a bit of over-polishing can cut right through to the soft underlayer. At that point, it's find new parts or learn how to case harden.

I'm ok with my trigger and haven't done any adjusting, although I'm sure I will. Not looking for a set-trigger break, anyway. These are hunting rifles, after all, no?

What, me worry???
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