Happy Birthday Julia Child: 100 years

Happy Birthday Julia Child: 100 years

Joined: July 2nd, 2001, 12:16 pm

August 15th, 2012, 1:38 pm #1

I know she is dead, but she DID live to be 91. Her husband lived to be 92. They drank, smoked, and likely ate more sodium and butter than anyone outside of native Frenchmen.

I was always a fan of Julia and watched her shows in real time and in re-broadcasts. I was given her book (Mastering the Art of French Cooking) as a gift and was so impressed I wanted to read more.

Her (auto)biography "My Life in France" is well-written and very entertaining. Two things are clear: she and her husband were dearly in love, and she was a driven worker who would have succeeded in ANY thing she took on. She didn't just write down recipes, she tried variations of each to adapt it to the American kitchen. Some recipes failed 20 times before she found the right way to make them with supplies at your local Kroger's.

If you watched "Julie and Julia", the parts on "Julia" were taken right from her biography. If you agree that those are the only parts worth watching in the film, and you owe it to your self to read "My Life in France".

BTW, any of the recipes in Mastering the Art of French Cooking can be used on your wild game. Substituting squirrel for chicken in Coq au Vin is a real winner! The amount of butter and wine in the Boef Bourguignon protects even the most lean venison.
Last edited by Whiteleather on August 15th, 2012, 1:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 27th, 2001, 4:44 pm

August 15th, 2012, 1:52 pm #2

was when she was cooking some sort of meat and wanted to sear the outside so she put on a welder's helmet and dropped it down over here head like an expert and used a torch for the searing.... Makes me smile just thinking about it.

Back at UT, on any given Saturday, my buds would invite me to go out to the lake for the day and I'd say no as I had some cooking shows to watch. They'd call me a dork...

I've learned so much from them and love cooking as well. That's why I have this sweet six pack mid section... ha ha.

Zeke

"On top of spring they also make summer, fall and winter rifles"
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Joined: July 2nd, 2001, 12:16 pm

August 15th, 2012, 2:16 pm #3

...Julia explained how easy it was to make three cuts on a fish: belly, throat, vent. Then you just grab and twist and all the innards come out in one package.

Well....she laid out a big lake trout or some large fish about 24" long. She made her three cuts. The grabbed the throat area and pulled. That 2' fish produced about 8 feet of intestines and organs all attached and strung out as far as Julia's very long arms could reach. I remember that something wet flew off to the right as she yanked.

I swear the camera was shaking from the camera man either laughing or retching.

I don't care. I loved Julia for her passion and the fact she didn't do re-takes.

I watched a few episodes of Iron Chef. Not very instructive, over produced and too predictable. With Julia you never knew what to expect, but you always learned something useful. Her simple set was perfect for instructional video.
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Joined: December 25th, 2010, 4:18 pm

August 15th, 2012, 2:51 pm #4



" Heaven is under our feet
as well as over our heads " Henry David Thoreau
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Joined: October 14th, 2003, 4:56 am

August 16th, 2012, 8:40 am #5

I know she is dead, but she DID live to be 91. Her husband lived to be 92. They drank, smoked, and likely ate more sodium and butter than anyone outside of native Frenchmen.

I was always a fan of Julia and watched her shows in real time and in re-broadcasts. I was given her book (Mastering the Art of French Cooking) as a gift and was so impressed I wanted to read more.

Her (auto)biography "My Life in France" is well-written and very entertaining. Two things are clear: she and her husband were dearly in love, and she was a driven worker who would have succeeded in ANY thing she took on. She didn't just write down recipes, she tried variations of each to adapt it to the American kitchen. Some recipes failed 20 times before she found the right way to make them with supplies at your local Kroger's.

If you watched "Julie and Julia", the parts on "Julia" were taken right from her biography. If you agree that those are the only parts worth watching in the film, and you owe it to your self to read "My Life in France".

BTW, any of the recipes in Mastering the Art of French Cooking can be used on your wild game. Substituting squirrel for chicken in Coq au Vin is a real winner! The amount of butter and wine in the Boef Bourguignon protects even the most lean venison.
"I know some of you out there are afraid of butter. For those of you who are, you can substitute with HEAVY CREAM for this recipe."

With Letterman...

"Julia, won't one bite of this stuff pretty much clog my arteries and cause me to drop dead on the spot?"

"Ohhh, possibly."
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