Gamo 128 info needed

Gamo 128 info needed

Joined: May 7th, 2007, 8:33 pm

May 7th, 2007, 8:38 pm #1

Does anyone know anything about a Gamo 128?

I have a chance to buy one, but I have never seen it, but I know the owner, and his firearms are always well taken care of. Does anyone know what they are worth? How accurate are they? Parts available? Pictures?

Thanks in advance for the info.

Keith

P.S. I want to use it for smallbore rifle training, and the occcasional pest.
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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

May 7th, 2007, 11:08 pm #2

I'm not sure what rifle that is. Single stroke pneumatic match rifles?

THINK it's Daisy's numbers for some Gamo match rifles imported for a short time...a 128 and a 131?...know in Europe as the Conquest and Super Match. I should know the numbers, as I have one of each.

If I'm right...

Would proably pass. Unless you know the rifles and are mechanically inclined, they are hard to find parts for and very few airsmiths will work on them. Are not a compicated design, but the parts situation is "iffy" (Although JG airguns has the parts...he won't work on them anymore, but has the parts).

One in good working order is an accurate rifle...can't tell the goups shot with one from ones shot with a FWB 300 or RWS 75. Hardwood stock rather than Walnut, but that dowsn't effect the shooting. They are accurate rifles, and don't wear out any faster than Walthers...but it's difficult to have one fixed when the seals do go.

So, if I remember the number system right, this is a 128 (but this one is marked as a Conquest as Daisy didn't import it):


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OK...got the numbers straight. The 126 and 128 look more-or-less identical and do have idential mechanical parts...any real differnces are very minor (couple of tapped holes for an optional open rear sight, accessory rail, and a little bit different inletting (enough so that the stocks won't inercahnge).

Still voting to "pass" on a non-functioning unit unless you find a airsmith willing to rebuild at a reasonable cost...would consider a fully functional one, but would be aware that repairs would increasly become a problem.
Last edited by gubb33ps on May 8th, 2007, 2:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 13th, 2007, 1:50 am

May 10th, 2007, 2:13 am #3

The Daisy Super Match 126 and 128 are very similar guns. The 126 has a solid match target stock. I believe the 128 is a "universal" with an adjustable cheek rest and other "high-end" features. Both were made by Gamo and imported by Daisy in the '80s and early '90s. I believe Daisy custom ordered them with Walther barrels instead of the standard ones. Cost for the 126 was somewhere in the $400+ range 15 years ago.

Gamo's original versions of the gun are the MC Contest and MC Super. Identical firing mechanisms. The Contest is a sporting-class gun with a light field stock and a rear blade sight. I don't think Daisy sold this model. The Super is Daisy's 126 with a match stock. I'm not sure if Gamo made a domestic version of the 128.

ASI also sold these as Super Match models, not sure about that lineage.

The guns are single-strokes with a layout similar with a Walther LGR. The unique feature is that there's a secondary piston withing the main cocking piston. It's some kind of air or gas ram. Designed to allow for lower cocking effort for the power. This ram can deflate over time and your FPS will drop from mid 500s into the 400s.

From what I've read most of the seals are available without great fuss. The ram is the only questionable part, but many Yellowforum members have found different solutions. They run from repressurizing the ram to replacing it with a solid block to take up the volume.

For working 126's in good shape, $240-300 seems to be the going rate. I just bought one so I'll have a field report soon.




Last edited by ABTOMAT on May 16th, 2007, 9:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

May 11th, 2007, 3:17 am #4

..is mine, no Daisy markings, serial number starts with MC. Does NOT have an accessory rail in the forened and does have two tapped holes on top of the breech were some type of open rear sight lived...metal trigger guard..brown adjustable butt pad...also came with match sights.

This one (will insert pix) is almost identical, Does have the accessory rail in the fore end, no threaded holes at the breech. Accessory rail marked "free Instruction Manual Write Daisy, Rodgers, AR 72756", black butt pad, plastic trigger guard, and the stock does not quite interchange (is some minor differnce at the very end of the forearm inletting).


The one pictured here has been rebuilt...but it's a fustrating process.

these guns have an odd oil-filled inner chamber inside the piston...which interacts with a plastic "button" that extends from the center of the piston. Are several seals inside the piston to run that button.

Waht seems to happen is that the piston closes to full compression, it forces that oil filled piston (takes about 200 pounds of force to move it) to retract a bit....evidently, that retraction can vary, and by doing so, is supose to even out the velocity a bit (at least that's what the Spainish langurage review calims). What I do know, if that inner system isn't working, vel. is in the BB gun range (350fps)...if it is working, vel. is nearer 600fps.

The valve has TWO seals on it, and it's small. Is set to be srping tensioned OPEN....there is a trigger latch in the front of the reciver that holds it closed...the trigger trips that latch, which lets the valve pop open. MAkes for a very good trigger pull as what the trigger does is release a spring force rather than wack a valve with a spring force.

But I'll say it again...are few people willing to undertake a rebuild on this one...are a couple, but better to get that lined up before you spend $ on an inoperable one. Will say this for it: the trigger is a complicated unit, but will lift off the rifle AS A UNIT, so there is no reason to take it apart...and that is a real blessing.
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The one pictures is in the process of being converted....am going to try a new seal system, and see if I can do away with that damnedable inner oil filled assembly (even if I lose 100fps, I'd like a simpler system).
Last edited by gubb33ps on May 11th, 2007, 3:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 13th, 2007, 1:50 am

May 11th, 2007, 5:33 am #5

I'm curious, are you sure that booster ram is actually oil filled? Oil by nature is incompressible. The design seems to be a pressurized air chamber with some ring seals to prevent the filling from escaping. One fellow found that by shooting the gun without the plastic dust seal the internal pressure of the ram would be equalized and power restored.

Another guy on Yellowforum replaced the gas ram guts with a solid sealed block. Velocity went back to the stock 550fps or so but cocking effort went up slightly.

The intent of the piston arrangement appears to me to be designed to lessen the cocking force while still allowing for good velocity and pressure. In a normal SSP of a given stroke you can either have very little free space at the end of the stroke, making for high pressure and cocking effort, or more free space that leads to lower pressures. The Gamo booster ram only compresses when close to full pressure is reached, creating sort of a virtual larger cylinder.
Last edited by ABTOMAT on May 16th, 2007, 9:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

May 11th, 2007, 11:18 am #6

He still has the parts, but doesn't rebuild them anymore (he did at one time). He can supply the parts if needed. Pehaps I missunderstood him...was lucky in that that last rifle only needed the button and it's seal (and the piston seal..and a release valve). Do have the seals needed for that internal piston, and if I ever have to go in there, will let you know what's inside. Once the other seals swere replaced, the little rifle clocked 603fps, which i figure is a pretty good indication i didn't need to open it up and do any more seal work.

For a match gun, it's really not a bad one to take apart and (more important) get back together right, but as i've not seen instuctions, you'll just have to think it out for yourself.

There is some dead space as the central "button" is aboput 1/2 the diameter of the cylinder, but i do belive your description is the way it is supose to work.
Last edited by gubb33ps on May 11th, 2007, 11:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: April 13th, 2007, 1:50 am

May 13th, 2007, 12:23 am #7

Does anyone know anything about a Gamo 128?

I have a chance to buy one, but I have never seen it, but I know the owner, and his firearms are always well taken care of. Does anyone know what they are worth? How accurate are they? Parts available? Pictures?

Thanks in advance for the info.

Keith

P.S. I want to use it for smallbore rifle training, and the occcasional pest.
.........
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Joined: May 7th, 2007, 8:33 pm

May 13th, 2007, 12:42 am #8

no, I didn't buy (or even see)it yet, but I probably will. I know the owner and I have his word that he will not sell it or the Anschutz 64 rifle that I want until I see them and tell him if I want them or not. Right now, I am saving up some money because their is a 99.999999% cance that I will take them both. Thanks for asking, and I will try to keep all informed.

This will be my first "real" air rifle, and I don't really know what to expect. If I get it, would I need a special scope to put on it, and what brand would be good. Also, what kind of pellets should I try first?
Thanks!
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Joined: April 13th, 2007, 1:50 am

May 13th, 2007, 4:35 am #9

First, if you do buy it don't go crazy on the price of the Gamo. It might shoot like a $1K gun, but it's still an oddball. The fancy 128 is rare and worth more than the 126, though.

As far as a scope, you can mount anything you want on it. No awkward recoil like a spring gun, and the receiver is quite long. But I don't actually have mine yet so I'd defer to a current owner for any of that info.

Personally I'd stick with the original peep sight unless you're going for longer range or something tricky. And until you get it chronographed (to make sure the booster is working) I'd forget hunting. Last thing you want to do is shoot a critter with a 425fps rifle.
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Joined: April 13th, 2007, 1:50 am

May 16th, 2007, 9:28 pm #10

He still has the parts, but doesn't rebuild them anymore (he did at one time). He can supply the parts if needed. Pehaps I missunderstood him...was lucky in that that last rifle only needed the button and it's seal (and the piston seal..and a release valve). Do have the seals needed for that internal piston, and if I ever have to go in there, will let you know what's inside. Once the other seals swere replaced, the little rifle clocked 603fps, which i figure is a pretty good indication i didn't need to open it up and do any more seal work.

For a match gun, it's really not a bad one to take apart and (more important) get back together right, but as i've not seen instuctions, you'll just have to think it out for yourself.

There is some dead space as the central "button" is aboput 1/2 the diameter of the cylinder, but i do belive your description is the way it is supose to work.
The cocking piston is unique in that it's filled with both air and oil. Apparently the body of the piston is filled with oil, and an air pocket is introduced when assembly is completed. So you have a small bubble of air getting compressed by the volume of oil. This allows the piston to work properly without any funky precharging.
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