FWB 65 MK II Question

FWB 65 MK II Question

Joined: September 1st, 2016, 2:30 pm

July 15th, 2017, 11:36 pm #1

Can someone tell me the first year the FWB 65 MK II started using two springs ?
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Joined: May 6th, 2013, 6:24 pm

July 16th, 2017, 1:03 am #2

Around 1980, iirc. Beeman called the longer one the Mk.1 and the shorter(Junior in FWB-speak) the Mk.2.
Last edited by garczar on July 16th, 2017, 1:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: March 18th, 2011, 6:24 am

July 16th, 2017, 4:15 am #3

I was under the impression that all MK II's were short barrel pistol
but that doesn't seem to be the case, MK II's could be long or short barreled pistols
I wish a had all the back and forth but they twisted my arm and I changed my mind, what little I have

http://www.network54.com/Forum/79537/th ... MK++II-+nt

some more info, look for Mike Driskill post
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Joined: September 1st, 2016, 2:30 pm

July 16th, 2017, 9:59 am #4

Can someone tell me the first year the FWB 65 MK II started using two springs ?
Thanks guys.
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Joined: April 18th, 2001, 2:28 am

July 16th, 2017, 12:15 pm #5

Can someone tell me the first year the FWB 65 MK II started using two springs ?
I believe the second spring was one of the modifications that appeared on the 65 at the time the model 80 was released. The grip tang was lengthened and the sights changed then, as well.

The second spring is a very light one, that actually fits inside the main spring (they don't go end-to-end as in the FWB 300S rifles). I think it was intended more to reduce vibration, there is no way it can add much power. I believe I'm correct in saying, it's no longer available as a spare part, and is often deleted in modern rebuilds.

The "Mark" numbers were purely marketing inventions by Beeman, they did not come from the Feinwerkbau factory. Beeman originally called the improved post-model 80, long-barrelled 65 the "Mk 1," and the short-barreled version the "Mk 2." But near the end of the 65's production run, FWB discontinued the short version...so the long version got "promoted" to "Mk 2" in the Beeman catalog!

Although US shooter Don Nygord famously used a 65 shorty to set a world record, he did not invent the gun or have it custom made as the Beeman catalog claimed. FWB offered short-barrel "Junior" versions of the 65 from the earliest days of its production.
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Joined: September 1st, 2016, 2:30 pm

July 16th, 2017, 12:56 pm #6

It was my understanding that they did in fact go to the double spring like the FWB 300S. From what I've read, the "inner" small spring didn't really amount to much so it was discontinued. BUT, this is only what I've read and don't have first hand knowledge.
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Joined: April 18th, 2001, 2:28 am

July 16th, 2017, 6:08 pm #7

...the second spring in the 65, as you said, is a light one that fits inside the much heavier mainspring. I've frankly never been convinced it did much of anything! And it seems to have come and gone in 65 production without much notice.

The double springs in the FWB 300S are a completely different concept. The action's main spring is in fact two short springs, which are wound in opposite directions, and which fit end-to-end inside the receiver. This idea was probably borrowed from the earlier Walther LGV target rifle--in fact, the spring assemblies for these two guns are interchangeable--the idea being to lessen the torque effect as the spring expands.

Walther didn't invent this concept either. The classic BSA underlevers first used such a spring more than 100 years ago!
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Joined: March 18th, 2011, 6:24 am

July 16th, 2017, 7:02 pm #8

I believe the second spring was one of the modifications that appeared on the 65 at the time the model 80 was released. The grip tang was lengthened and the sights changed then, as well.

The second spring is a very light one, that actually fits inside the main spring (they don't go end-to-end as in the FWB 300S rifles). I think it was intended more to reduce vibration, there is no way it can add much power. I believe I'm correct in saying, it's no longer available as a spare part, and is often deleted in modern rebuilds.

The "Mark" numbers were purely marketing inventions by Beeman, they did not come from the Feinwerkbau factory. Beeman originally called the improved post-model 80, long-barrelled 65 the "Mk 1," and the short-barreled version the "Mk 2." But near the end of the 65's production run, FWB discontinued the short version...so the long version got "promoted" to "Mk 2" in the Beeman catalog!

Although US shooter Don Nygord famously used a 65 shorty to set a world record, he did not invent the gun or have it custom made as the Beeman catalog claimed. FWB offered short-barrel "Junior" versions of the 65 from the earliest days of its production.
sometimes i swear no one read the posts above theres LOL HI Mike NT
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