FWB 300 Universal - refinished stock pics for Joe Wayne Rhea

FWB 300 Universal - refinished stock pics for Joe Wayne Rhea

Joined: March 9th, 2015, 3:39 am

February 16th, 2017, 5:36 pm #1

As requested - MinWax Dark Walnut stain with 10 coats of Formby's tung oil finish and final rub out with Renaissance micro-crystalline wax.


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After







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Joined: September 16th, 2014, 1:54 am

February 16th, 2017, 6:41 pm #2

Fantastic work Ed !!!/
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Joined: November 28th, 2010, 2:13 pm

February 16th, 2017, 8:20 pm #3

As requested - MinWax Dark Walnut stain with 10 coats of Formby's tung oil finish and final rub out with Renaissance micro-crystalline wax.


Before





After







I think Joe did a very stunning job as well. Wish my photography was a bit better.







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Joined: April 9th, 2007, 2:06 am

February 16th, 2017, 11:51 pm #4

As requested - MinWax Dark Walnut stain with 10 coats of Formby's tung oil finish and final rub out with Renaissance micro-crystalline wax.


Before





After







IMO the fwb dark walnut stain goes with the black stippling and black action better. The blond wood has to much contrast and looks choppy to me. But it is good looking wood.

brent s
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Joined: May 6th, 2005, 12:32 am

February 17th, 2017, 5:23 am #5

The refinished stocks aren't to my tastes.

Too glossy, and too harsh between black stippling and the light timber.

I am also not a fan of the refinished beech one as it just always seems to look "dirty" for a better word.

But each to their own.

Enjoy them.
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Joined: March 14th, 2001, 8:23 pm

February 17th, 2017, 8:45 pm #6

IMO the fwb dark walnut stain goes with the black stippling and black action better. The blond wood has to much contrast and looks choppy to me. But it is good looking wood.

brent s
Here's one I did 14 years ago. It was pretty beat up looking before hand. Part of a good process, is to never sand the original if possible. This was done entirely with finish remover and scraping. Then went back on with JM's London Oil finish.





Note it would have been good here to have used some stain work to level out the color right behind the pistol grip. Also some will notice that the grip cap is modified. Originally it would have had a "lip" in the front, but at some point the ISSF rules disallowed that and a previous owner had modified it. I just tried to polish it up.
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Joined: November 28th, 2010, 2:13 pm

February 17th, 2017, 9:20 pm #7

And on one side, has a lot of dings that will have to be sanded out. Yours looks nice.
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Joined: March 9th, 2015, 3:39 am

February 17th, 2017, 10:12 pm #8

I think Joe did a very stunning job as well. Wish my photography was a bit better.







Joe Wayne does good work!
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Joined: March 9th, 2015, 3:39 am

February 17th, 2017, 10:18 pm #9

Here's one I did 14 years ago. It was pretty beat up looking before hand. Part of a good process, is to never sand the original if possible. This was done entirely with finish remover and scraping. Then went back on with JM's London Oil finish.





Note it would have been good here to have used some stain work to level out the color right behind the pistol grip. Also some will notice that the grip cap is modified. Originally it would have had a "lip" in the front, but at some point the ISSF rules disallowed that and a previous owner had modified it. I just tried to polish it up.
Your wood has some nice figuring. I think FWB used a dark stain to give the stocks an even overall color. I like the way lighter tints bring out the grain and figuring, especially on walnut - more interesting visually than monotone finishes. I haven't tried London Oil, I'll check it out.
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