Finally picked up a tenor

Finally picked up a tenor

Joined: February 9th, 2001, 1:40 am

March 31st, 2012, 12:37 am #1

sAx that is. Yanagisawa T880. Serial number dates it to 1984. It was a donation to a local school by someone who obviously knew horns because they (Yani's) are known as some of the best horns ever made. But as usual, who knows how many kids played and abused it because it was "the school's horn" and didn't know what they had.

Well the last kid dropped it hard on its bow and the band teacher took it to my tech to either have it fixed or traded on something which worked. He knew what it was and made a trade on an intermediate/student model and took the Yanagisawa. When I showed up he showed me the horn and we struck an "about this much" price, Then I waited on him to get the necessary parts and work out the dent(!). This deal started well before Christmas and he waited on Conn Selmer to get a proper bow guard out to him. In the mean time he went through his stash of old parts horns and found a student line King tenor he'd already parted into. He took the matching bow guard, put it on this Yani and called me up.

I didn't notice it before but someone had used a same-era mouthpiece made by Martin. A friend informed me that by this time Yanagisawa was stenciling their own horns as the last of the Martins. The mouthpiece was actually one of theirs. And I'd picked up a new Yanagisawa mouthpiece for this horn. I didn't know about the Martin connection until after I talked my friend this evening.

I have to say, this is one comfortable playing tenor. The keywork, the regulation... really nice tone.

I know no one really cares about saxes but I felt like some of you musicians around here could relate to another musician finding that special instrument we're always on the hunt for.

Harv
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Joined: April 27th, 2001, 4:44 pm

March 31st, 2012, 3:25 am #2

I've been into string instruments for a while. My son, 11, joined his middle school band and has picked up the bug for various instruments. I just bought him a Yamaha sax... he's a jammin' fool.
Thanks for sharing,
Zeke

"On top of spring they also make summer, fall and winter rifles"
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

March 31st, 2012, 5:16 am #3


63 pieces, all Brasses, Woodwinds, and 8 percussionists...no strings.

They had 3 Altos and 2 Tenors. Great performance on highlights from Phantom of the Opera!

Congrats on your new Stan Getz/John Coltrane/Lester Young Machine!

Hal
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Joined: November 11th, 2010, 7:58 pm

March 31st, 2012, 8:47 am #4

sAx that is. Yanagisawa T880. Serial number dates it to 1984. It was a donation to a local school by someone who obviously knew horns because they (Yani's) are known as some of the best horns ever made. But as usual, who knows how many kids played and abused it because it was "the school's horn" and didn't know what they had.

Well the last kid dropped it hard on its bow and the band teacher took it to my tech to either have it fixed or traded on something which worked. He knew what it was and made a trade on an intermediate/student model and took the Yanagisawa. When I showed up he showed me the horn and we struck an "about this much" price, Then I waited on him to get the necessary parts and work out the dent(!). This deal started well before Christmas and he waited on Conn Selmer to get a proper bow guard out to him. In the mean time he went through his stash of old parts horns and found a student line King tenor he'd already parted into. He took the matching bow guard, put it on this Yani and called me up.

I didn't notice it before but someone had used a same-era mouthpiece made by Martin. A friend informed me that by this time Yanagisawa was stenciling their own horns as the last of the Martins. The mouthpiece was actually one of theirs. And I'd picked up a new Yanagisawa mouthpiece for this horn. I didn't know about the Martin connection until after I talked my friend this evening.

I have to say, this is one comfortable playing tenor. The keywork, the regulation... really nice tone.

I know no one really cares about saxes but I felt like some of you musicians around here could relate to another musician finding that special instrument we're always on the hunt for.

Harv
classical instead of a .22 Rapid. Good find and good for you!
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Joined: February 9th, 2001, 1:40 am

March 31st, 2012, 2:02 pm #5

I've been into string instruments for a while. My son, 11, joined his middle school band and has picked up the bug for various instruments. I just bought him a Yamaha sax... he's a jammin' fool.
Thanks for sharing,
Zeke

"On top of spring they also make summer, fall and winter rifles"
Believe it or not, their old Yas 23, a student model, is becoming a somewhat sought after learning instrument. Far as I'm concerned, there's nothing really student or intermediate about them. My wife has a Vito, which is a stenciled Yamaha 23. Great playing horn and mouthpiece friendly too. Which, quite honestly, makes them a quality lifetime instrument.

Don't let "them" (the quote-unquote internet music gurus) tell ya you can't enjoy every minute playing a so called student line Yammy. Most touring pros take back up horns with them and often enough, you'll find a 23 or something similar in the other case.

If you can find an early-ish model 62, you've got the full bells pro grade version.

Oh, and the action on the older Yammis is smooth for an unusual reason in the the sax world; they used very long stainless steel needles. They just don't seem to go bad. The pads have a lifespan, but the needle springs don't seem to.

Harv
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Joined: February 9th, 2001, 1:40 am

March 31st, 2012, 2:08 pm #6

63 pieces, all Brasses, Woodwinds, and 8 percussionists...no strings.

They had 3 Altos and 2 Tenors. Great performance on highlights from Phantom of the Opera!

Congrats on your new Stan Getz/John Coltrane/Lester Young Machine!

Hal
Yeah, the arrangers are getting better and better regarding concert type bands. We're seeing better and better scores for non stringed groups and ensembles. I know it sounds odd, but even as a sax player I really love the classical stuff. Probably my favorite. The precision and dynamics necessary to play something well always leave me striving to play better than the last time. So much emotion, even though so much is written and therefore required to be played as written. You really gotta nail the score before you can even consider putting your own signature on it.

Harv
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Joined: February 9th, 2001, 1:40 am

March 31st, 2012, 2:09 pm #7

classical instead of a .22 Rapid. Good find and good for you!
I'm guessing... guitar?

Forgive me if I'm being thick.

Edit>

Of COURSE guitar! Duh. Now you've got to tell more about it.

Harv
Last edited by eureeka on March 31st, 2012, 3:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

March 31st, 2012, 3:09 pm #8

Yeah, the arrangers are getting better and better regarding concert type bands. We're seeing better and better scores for non stringed groups and ensembles. I know it sounds odd, but even as a sax player I really love the classical stuff. Probably my favorite. The precision and dynamics necessary to play something well always leave me striving to play better than the last time. So much emotion, even though so much is written and therefore required to be played as written. You really gotta nail the score before you can even consider putting your own signature on it.

Harv
You're probably aware then that Ravel's famous Bolero has a sax solo in it! (don't remember if alto or tenor)

In your opinion, what is the easiest wind instrument to learn to play? (and I KNOW it ain't the Oboe!)

Howl
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Joined: February 9th, 2001, 1:40 am

March 31st, 2012, 3:13 pm #9

I would say the saxophone both as easy to learn to play and probably easiest to play well. Although the flute doesn't have an altissimo range... Nah, still the sax I think.

Unless you include the recorder haha.

Harv
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Joined: January 6th, 2006, 3:27 am

March 31st, 2012, 4:54 pm #10

...they use an "Octave Key", which gives you the upper register using the same fingering as the lower register.

The Clarinet, on the other hand, uses a "Register Key" which kicks the tones up a Twelfth, requiring 2 trains of thought when crossing the break.

Maybe I'll rent a Sax an give it a try...if I get good enough to pass the instructor's audition for entering a beginning band class at our local college, then it's a go! How about Alto?

Thanks,
Harold

Last edited by tracer69 on March 31st, 2012, 5:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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