can a drill press be used

can a drill press be used

Joined: September 14th, 2008, 10:43 pm

November 29th, 2008, 8:08 pm #1

for milling button recesses in a springer piston? with the proper bit of course.
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Joined: February 1st, 2008, 3:28 am

November 30th, 2008, 3:24 am #2

There are a couple of videos on how to convert a drill press for milling. The first step is to put concrete inside the hollow tube holding the motor. The concrete does a good job of stiffening up the tube. If it's really light milling on plastic or aluminum, you might get by without modifying the drill press.
Last edited by Springer_177 on November 30th, 2008, 3:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: May 8th, 2001, 4:06 pm

November 30th, 2008, 4:15 am #3

for milling button recesses in a springer piston? with the proper bit of course.
for milling may be ok as long as it is straight down force. Its the side-to-side stuff that the drill press can't handle very well. Bearings are usually not set up for it. Lower end drill presses may not be set up to handle even straight down pressure, as Stan mentioned. Some pistons are pretty hard, maybe require carbide to make a dent.

My thots, anyway, on the subject.

Good luck, Jon
Last edited by eeler1 on November 30th, 2008, 4:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 14th, 2008, 10:43 pm

November 30th, 2008, 9:46 pm #4

i want to button it. i used JM old school buttons on it. on the front near the seal they have held fine attached with super glue (per jm instrucions. on the rear they shear off. the rear must take more stress (which is why they are needed there). i thought that milling some very shallow pockets for them would help them hold better. its just a straight down operation in not terribly hard metal.
the pockets meed to be .25 wide and flat on the bottom which is why i can't use a drill bit. what kind of bit should i ask for if i try this?
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Joined: September 14th, 2008, 10:43 pm

December 2nd, 2008, 2:22 am #5

??
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Joined: August 9th, 2003, 5:29 am

December 2nd, 2008, 5:47 pm #6

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Joined: May 14th, 2004, 4:11 pm

December 3rd, 2008, 10:27 pm #7

i want to button it. i used JM old school buttons on it. on the front near the seal they have held fine attached with super glue (per jm instrucions. on the rear they shear off. the rear must take more stress (which is why they are needed there). i thought that milling some very shallow pockets for them would help them hold better. its just a straight down operation in not terribly hard metal.
the pockets meed to be .25 wide and flat on the bottom which is why i can't use a drill bit. what kind of bit should i ask for if i try this?
I was able to use my drill press with carbide bit and hand turn the chuck to make the shallow holes for the buttons. I believe that Paul Watts speaks of how soft these piston are on his website.

Jeff P
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Joined: June 8th, 2008, 2:06 am

December 12th, 2008, 5:00 pm #8

i want to button it. i used JM old school buttons on it. on the front near the seal they have held fine attached with super glue (per jm instrucions. on the rear they shear off. the rear must take more stress (which is why they are needed there). i thought that milling some very shallow pockets for them would help them hold better. its just a straight down operation in not terribly hard metal.
the pockets meed to be .25 wide and flat on the bottom which is why i can't use a drill bit. what kind of bit should i ask for if i try this?
<p>end mills in a drill press (be sure to solidly clamp the piston). Only a shallow "c-bore" is needed to retain the buttons. The reason the buttons held next to the seal and not on the skirt is because there is very little cocking foot pressure at the seal but a lot of pressure as the shoe presses the rear of the piston during the cocking stroke.</p><p>You can order endmills here......</p><p><a href="http://www.mcmaster.com/" rel="nofollow"></a>>></p><p>McMaster Carr delivers quickly and they have a lot of useful stuff. </p>
Last edited by nced on December 12th, 2008, 5:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 14th, 2008, 10:43 pm

December 14th, 2008, 6:35 am #9

i may still give it a go.
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lhd
Joined: January 9th, 2002, 2:30 am

December 30th, 2008, 7:02 am #10

then use a four-flute endmill at the very slowest speed you can get. A good drill vice is a MUST.

I used to do lots of milling with my Drillpress and X/Y drill vice. Just need to go slow and careful.
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