Any 45-70 Trapdoor shooters here?

Any 45-70 Trapdoor shooters here?

Joined: February 7th, 2012, 11:47 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 5:01 pm #1

I recently bought a US Springfield Model 1884 trapdoor made in 1887.
The rifle is in very good shape. It still has a lot of blue and the bore shines like a mirror. The tool marks are still in the rifling. This gun has been fired very little.
The action is as tight as a new one. I want to shoot this gun but I would rather not use black powder cartridges. I have heard that light smokeless powder loads can be used.
Does anyone know of any factory ammo available for this rifle?
If it shoots good I will be looking for dies, and bullet mold.
This could very easily become one of my favorite guns.
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Joined: December 25th, 2010, 4:18 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 5:20 pm #2



have a nice day
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Joined: April 25th, 2003, 11:35 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 7:17 pm #3

I recently bought a US Springfield Model 1884 trapdoor made in 1887.
The rifle is in very good shape. It still has a lot of blue and the bore shines like a mirror. The tool marks are still in the rifling. This gun has been fired very little.
The action is as tight as a new one. I want to shoot this gun but I would rather not use black powder cartridges. I have heard that light smokeless powder loads can be used.
Does anyone know of any factory ammo available for this rifle?
If it shoots good I will be looking for dies, and bullet mold.
This could very easily become one of my favorite guns.
put up a pic.

small caliber joy
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Joined: February 7th, 2012, 11:47 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 8:11 pm #4

I can't take a pic until this weekend. It's at my other place.
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Joined: June 29th, 2009, 6:38 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 9:29 pm #5

I recently bought a US Springfield Model 1884 trapdoor made in 1887.
The rifle is in very good shape. It still has a lot of blue and the bore shines like a mirror. The tool marks are still in the rifling. This gun has been fired very little.
The action is as tight as a new one. I want to shoot this gun but I would rather not use black powder cartridges. I have heard that light smokeless powder loads can be used.
Does anyone know of any factory ammo available for this rifle?
If it shoots good I will be looking for dies, and bullet mold.
This could very easily become one of my favorite guns.
Carl, if my memory serves me correctly, most of the factory loaded ammo is loaded to the low pressures needed for the older guns. The high power stuff is noted as such and marked "Not for black powder firearms" or something similar.

I had a Trapdoor but loaded only black powder rounds. You will end up buying a set of dies and several bullet moulds as those guns are an absolute treat to shoot. Accurate Arms 5744 is a good powder to load and their is a ton of reloading info available for the 45-70.

And it will become one of your favorite guns! But you have to try black powder and get back to that guns roots!



Tom



"What, me worry?"

"If I were two faced would I be wearing this one?" - Abe Lincoln
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Joined: November 27th, 2009, 1:08 am

May 2nd, 2012, 10:56 pm #6

I recently bought a US Springfield Model 1884 trapdoor made in 1887.
The rifle is in very good shape. It still has a lot of blue and the bore shines like a mirror. The tool marks are still in the rifling. This gun has been fired very little.
The action is as tight as a new one. I want to shoot this gun but I would rather not use black powder cartridges. I have heard that light smokeless powder loads can be used.
Does anyone know of any factory ammo available for this rifle?
If it shoots good I will be looking for dies, and bullet mold.
This could very easily become one of my favorite guns.
All factory loads must be complient with the weakest action out there, for saftey regulation's sake, and the Trapdoor, AKA "Granpappy's flop Top" is arguably the weakest......... but that doesnt mean it wont shoot, nothing to fear at all, it's a fine rifle for sure!! I own 3 .45-70 rifles, and love em to death. A Pedersoli Sharps "Quigly" model with a 34" barrel, a Browning 1885 with a tang sight and crescent moon butt plate, and a Ruger No 1 with some vintage Weaver 2.5 X glass. All have wonderfull wood, and are superb shooters. Oh, and a SSK Industries T/C Contender with a TSOB full length scope rail, Four port Mag-Na-Porting, and Leupold glass. Now THAT one gets your attention.. Easy to load for, and heres a tip. For more accurate loads, and to apply even burning of powder, pick up some dacron/polyester pillow stuffing, and top off your loaded brass with a wad of stuffing before adding bullet. Keeps the powder consistently flat against the primer. Ya see, black powder used up more space in the case, so now you have a void, where it lays across the bottom (side) of casing. Lightly compressed is better. Stay in the lower power levels and you will be fine.
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Joined: February 7th, 2012, 11:47 pm

May 3rd, 2012, 12:42 am #7

Now I need dies and a mold.
eBay here I come.

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Joined: February 7th, 2012, 11:47 pm

May 3rd, 2012, 12:44 am #8

Carl, if my memory serves me correctly, most of the factory loaded ammo is loaded to the low pressures needed for the older guns. The high power stuff is noted as such and marked "Not for black powder firearms" or something similar.

I had a Trapdoor but loaded only black powder rounds. You will end up buying a set of dies and several bullet moulds as those guns are an absolute treat to shoot. Accurate Arms 5744 is a good powder to load and their is a ton of reloading info available for the 45-70.

And it will become one of your favorite guns! But you have to try black powder and get back to that guns roots!



Tom



"What, me worry?"

"If I were two faced would I be wearing this one?" - Abe Lincoln
But I dread the cleaning.

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Joined: September 18th, 2011, 3:21 pm

May 3rd, 2012, 2:53 am #9

I recently bought a US Springfield Model 1884 trapdoor made in 1887.
The rifle is in very good shape. It still has a lot of blue and the bore shines like a mirror. The tool marks are still in the rifling. This gun has been fired very little.
The action is as tight as a new one. I want to shoot this gun but I would rather not use black powder cartridges. I have heard that light smokeless powder loads can be used.
Does anyone know of any factory ammo available for this rifle?
If it shoots good I will be looking for dies, and bullet mold.
This could very easily become one of my favorite guns.
I have a Trapdoor of about the same vintage as yours. It's a shooter and has no problem handling Remington smokeless loads. Of course, black powder would be safer and you get that nice sulfer-smelling cloud of smoke
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Joined: July 24th, 2005, 2:05 pm

May 3rd, 2012, 2:45 pm #10

I recently bought a US Springfield Model 1884 trapdoor made in 1887.
The rifle is in very good shape. It still has a lot of blue and the bore shines like a mirror. The tool marks are still in the rifling. This gun has been fired very little.
The action is as tight as a new one. I want to shoot this gun but I would rather not use black powder cartridges. I have heard that light smokeless powder loads can be used.
Does anyone know of any factory ammo available for this rifle?
If it shoots good I will be looking for dies, and bullet mold.
This could very easily become one of my favorite guns.
I shoot a light smokeless load of 13 grains of Red Dot shotgun powder and a 350-grain cast bullet. This is a mild load, but actually it may NOT be safe in your trapdoor. Search on the internet and you will find several levels of .45-70 loads, weak for trapdoors, stronger for Marlins (which I shoot), and stompers for Ruger single shots, etc. I load my cartridges with a Lee Loader and a big C-clamp, slow but makes good ammo, and not $40 a box, either.
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