.22 or .25 for more damage?

.22 or .25 for more damage?

Joined: January 16th, 2010, 5:43 pm

February 7th, 2010, 4:23 am #1

If you have two guns, one in .22 and one in .25. The .22 shooting a heavier pellet so that the muzzle energy (fpe) is the same for both of the projectiles.

Which projectile will have a greater effect on the target (hunting small game)?

The .25 will have a larger frontal area, but will that make is shed its energy faster due to the increased drag?

Will the larger wound channel from the .25 do more damage even at a lower energy at target impact?

Will the smaller cross sectioned .22 shed energy slower and have a flatter trajectory?

Reply
Share

Joined: July 17th, 2009, 1:17 am

February 7th, 2010, 4:26 am #2

so the .25cal takes this one IMO.
Reply
Share

Joined: July 14th, 2008, 9:10 pm

February 7th, 2010, 4:41 am #3

If you have two guns, one in .22 and one in .25. The .22 shooting a heavier pellet so that the muzzle energy (fpe) is the same for both of the projectiles.

Which projectile will have a greater effect on the target (hunting small game)?

The .25 will have a larger frontal area, but will that make is shed its energy faster due to the increased drag?

Will the larger wound channel from the .25 do more damage even at a lower energy at target impact?

Will the smaller cross sectioned .22 shed energy slower and have a flatter trajectory?
says bigger is better, but smaller is flatter shooting.

Age old battle. In the end, dead is dead.



Reply
Share

Joined: March 31st, 2008, 10:32 pm

February 7th, 2010, 5:03 am #4

If you have two guns, one in .22 and one in .25. The .22 shooting a heavier pellet so that the muzzle energy (fpe) is the same for both of the projectiles.

Which projectile will have a greater effect on the target (hunting small game)?

The .25 will have a larger frontal area, but will that make is shed its energy faster due to the increased drag?

Will the larger wound channel from the .25 do more damage even at a lower energy at target impact?

Will the smaller cross sectioned .22 shed energy slower and have a flatter trajectory?
Simple math the heaviest projectile retains the most energy at the POI

Sam
Last edited by rwssam on February 7th, 2010, 5:31 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Share

Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

February 7th, 2010, 5:03 am #5

If you have two guns, one in .22 and one in .25. The .22 shooting a heavier pellet so that the muzzle energy (fpe) is the same for both of the projectiles.

Which projectile will have a greater effect on the target (hunting small game)?

The .25 will have a larger frontal area, but will that make is shed its energy faster due to the increased drag?

Will the larger wound channel from the .25 do more damage even at a lower energy at target impact?

Will the smaller cross sectioned .22 shed energy slower and have a flatter trajectory?
Studied and rationalized the numbers on paper, not thinking the .25 had any real advanatge over a .22 at the same energy level. It's easy to think of them as "even" from paper anaysis, which I honestly did belive...until I tried a .25.

Probably not at it's best with lighter weight pellets, but the resuls on game so far have clearly been in the .25's favor. Certainly, put any kind of hole though the "off button" and the game falls down (which could mean the choice should be between .177 and everything elce) but in the real world, are some shots that don't go exactly where you planned (and some that do, but you planned wrong).

But consider this. BC basically predicts how well a pellet will move though the resistance of air. IF the pellet doesn't deform, that smae BC seems a very good predictor of how well those same pellets will move though heavy resistance (like meat).
Reply
Share

Joined: October 24th, 2006, 5:38 pm

February 7th, 2010, 6:10 am #6

If you have two guns, one in .22 and one in .25. The .22 shooting a heavier pellet so that the muzzle energy (fpe) is the same for both of the projectiles.

Which projectile will have a greater effect on the target (hunting small game)?

The .25 will have a larger frontal area, but will that make is shed its energy faster due to the increased drag?

Will the larger wound channel from the .25 do more damage even at a lower energy at target impact?

Will the smaller cross sectioned .22 shed energy slower and have a flatter trajectory?
If both the .22 and .25 pellets were of the same weight, and shooting the same fps. the question is a good one.
The .25 caliber will definitelty impart the most energy upon contact with what ever it hits, but the .22 will give the greater amount of penetration.

So if your shooting reletively small game I would say the .25 would have a more noticiable effect while the 22 would be just as deadly but with less smack.
If it's bigger game, say groundhog, raccon, or maybe even nutria the 25 might not get in deep enough to do the job where the 22 may with its added penetration.
having said all that I am a fan of the 25 in the 50ft/lb range and the .22 in 30ft/lb area.

Reply
Share

Joined: April 7th, 2009, 1:29 am

February 7th, 2010, 8:05 am #7

If you have two guns, one in .22 and one in .25. The .22 shooting a heavier pellet so that the muzzle energy (fpe) is the same for both of the projectiles.

Which projectile will have a greater effect on the target (hunting small game)?

The .25 will have a larger frontal area, but will that make is shed its energy faster due to the increased drag?

Will the larger wound channel from the .25 do more damage even at a lower energy at target impact?

Will the smaller cross sectioned .22 shed energy slower and have a flatter trajectory?
Shoving a needle 1 inch into your arm or a pencil 1/2 inch into your arm.
Reply
Share

q1q
Joined: May 24th, 2001, 2:45 am

February 7th, 2010, 2:14 pm #8

If you have two guns, one in .22 and one in .25. The .22 shooting a heavier pellet so that the muzzle energy (fpe) is the same for both of the projectiles.

Which projectile will have a greater effect on the target (hunting small game)?

The .25 will have a larger frontal area, but will that make is shed its energy faster due to the increased drag?

Will the larger wound channel from the .25 do more damage even at a lower energy at target impact?

Will the smaller cross sectioned .22 shed energy slower and have a flatter trajectory?
<p>There will be a different situation for 10 ft-lbs a different one for 15 ft-lbs, yet another for 20 ft-lbs, whole different ball game at 30 ft-lbs and no contest at 60 ft-lbs.</p><p>25/25 rule applies if all esle is equal. The higher in ft-lbs you get beyond 25, the .25 rules. If you shoot a critter at 15 yards and 15 ft-lbs, grab the .25. If you change the distance to 35 yards, don't touch the .25, grab the .22.</p><p>No simple answers. With my Greg Davis .25 at 55 ft-lbs, I don't have to worry about it. Any airgun distance is good. The power is there and the penetration is there. You need both.</p><p>Bottom line, you have to use the caliber that would penetrate most and preferably not exit. The .25 at anemic levels (any .25 gun below 20 ft-lbs IMO) and distances of 30 yards or so  would hit a crow on the wings and just tip it over, just to have it fly away.</p><p> Not enough frontal pressure to penetrate in that situation. Penetration is inversly proportional to the pellet's frontal area. The good thing about the .25, after it penetrates it slows faster inside the game, dispersing more of its energy where it counts.</p><p>If I didn't confuse you, you were not reading </p><p> </p>

Steve
Yellow Forums Administrator
http://www.yellowforum.com

Reply
Share

Joined: July 14th, 2008, 8:33 am

February 7th, 2010, 3:19 pm #9

If you have two guns, one in .22 and one in .25. The .22 shooting a heavier pellet so that the muzzle energy (fpe) is the same for both of the projectiles.

Which projectile will have a greater effect on the target (hunting small game)?

The .25 will have a larger frontal area, but will that make is shed its energy faster due to the increased drag?

Will the larger wound channel from the .25 do more damage even at a lower energy at target impact?

Will the smaller cross sectioned .22 shed energy slower and have a flatter trajectory?
At higher power levels.
Reply
Share

Joined: November 17th, 2006, 3:51 am

February 7th, 2010, 3:52 pm #10

<p>There will be a different situation for 10 ft-lbs a different one for 15 ft-lbs, yet another for 20 ft-lbs, whole different ball game at 30 ft-lbs and no contest at 60 ft-lbs.</p><p>25/25 rule applies if all esle is equal. The higher in ft-lbs you get beyond 25, the .25 rules. If you shoot a critter at 15 yards and 15 ft-lbs, grab the .25. If you change the distance to 35 yards, don't touch the .25, grab the .22.</p><p>No simple answers. With my Greg Davis .25 at 55 ft-lbs, I don't have to worry about it. Any airgun distance is good. The power is there and the penetration is there. You need both.</p><p>Bottom line, you have to use the caliber that would penetrate most and preferably not exit. The .25 at anemic levels (any .25 gun below 20 ft-lbs IMO) and distances of 30 yards or so  would hit a crow on the wings and just tip it over, just to have it fly away.</p><p> Not enough frontal pressure to penetrate in that situation. Penetration is inversly proportional to the pellet's frontal area. The good thing about the .25, after it penetrates it slows faster inside the game, dispersing more of its energy where it counts.</p><p>If I didn't confuse you, you were not reading </p><p> </p>

Steve
Yellow Forums Administrator
http://www.yellowforum.com
..which did mention that they both have the same energy. Would be comparing a heavy weight .22 pellet with a .25 pellet of something close to the same weight.

Nice pair up would be JSB's, which can be 25.4gr. in either caliber, but are other comparisons that are close enough (.22 Kodiaks vs. .25 trophy / .22 EJ vs .25 Kodiak).

So could have about the same weight, moving along at about the same speed, with the difference being in striking area... .038 vs .049 inches of contact area,,, and a difference in SD. For the game i hunt, either one tend to come out the other side when impacting at a decent vel.

Think steve is right. The fatter pellet tends to both slow down a little faster after impact and penetrate a bit less, dumping it's energy faster and contacting a larger volume...basically giving a bit more "thump" for a little less penetration.

Last edited by gubb33ps on February 7th, 2010, 3:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Share