.177 for long distance shooting?

.177 for long distance shooting?

Joined: May 28th, 2003, 6:14 pm

March 16th, 2010, 11:14 am #1

I noticed looking through the Chairgun pellet data base that .177 JSB heavies have a 0.031 BC. For a .177, that's high...real high. In fact it's higher than most .22 and .25 pellets. Now, that got me thinking, most PCP's should be able to easily shoot them in the upper 900's, and with that small a projectile I should be able to get lots of very consistent shots.

I'm thinking that a .177 Marauder sounds like just the ticket for some serious long range precision plinking, (out to 100+ yards). I'm thinking I might run it off a pony bottle for extra convenience and consistency. I might regulate it too, but I already have the pony bottle, so that's an easy option. The affordability of the pellets and the mags makes this look very attractive.
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Joined: April 25th, 2003, 11:35 pm

March 16th, 2010, 11:26 am #2

not too many signing up for this what with the popularity of the .22. this thing would be an inexpensive, fun quest for you. something like the .177 marauder is the ...basic... ...gun... and i'm kind of surprised that the .177 PCP doesn't get more traction. i only have the marauder in .177 but those with both calibers find the .177 gives more shots.
everyone relates to guns and ammo in their own way and that's the way it should be. i can't exactly verbalize the feeling i get, but best as i can, the confluence of extreme accuracy, minute groups, and minute ammo are the most fun that can be had. i can easily see how someone else can find the scenario undernourished and dinky.

small caliber joy
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Joined: August 4th, 2007, 2:34 pm

March 16th, 2010, 11:35 am #3

I noticed looking through the Chairgun pellet data base that .177 JSB heavies have a 0.031 BC. For a .177, that's high...real high. In fact it's higher than most .22 and .25 pellets. Now, that got me thinking, most PCP's should be able to easily shoot them in the upper 900's, and with that small a projectile I should be able to get lots of very consistent shots.

I'm thinking that a .177 Marauder sounds like just the ticket for some serious long range precision plinking, (out to 100+ yards). I'm thinking I might run it off a pony bottle for extra convenience and consistency. I might regulate it too, but I already have the pony bottle, so that's an easy option. The affordability of the pellets and the mags makes this look very attractive.
with the .177 heavy pellets,the Crosman ultra mag or heavy Premier would also be excellent at long range energy retention.You will find that these pellets are superb penetrators as well and lend themselves to hunting applications that many feel only larger calibers should be assigned to.I cannot comment on their resistance to crosswind influence,but you are certainly on the right track.

"Free until dead."
Determination that is incorruptible.
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Joined: February 15th, 2010, 10:01 pm

March 16th, 2010, 11:47 am #4

I noticed looking through the Chairgun pellet data base that .177 JSB heavies have a 0.031 BC. For a .177, that's high...real high. In fact it's higher than most .22 and .25 pellets. Now, that got me thinking, most PCP's should be able to easily shoot them in the upper 900's, and with that small a projectile I should be able to get lots of very consistent shots.

I'm thinking that a .177 Marauder sounds like just the ticket for some serious long range precision plinking, (out to 100+ yards). I'm thinking I might run it off a pony bottle for extra convenience and consistency. I might regulate it too, but I already have the pony bottle, so that's an easy option. The affordability of the pellets and the mags makes this look very attractive.
I have noticed a severe tendency to shift in the crosswinds. I was shooting 10.5gn CPH's .177 (~ same BC as JSB) @ 910 fps and my dad was shooting 14.3 CP's .22 @ 775 fps and we shot 30 shots each at 50 yds.

They were at the same time (we were both on a bench)with light winds (3mph?.) My shots shifted an a average of .5-.75" and his were an average of .25 -.375".

I'm convinced the .22 call pellets are better for long distance shooting. That's what most the varmint hunters use as well.

(+) Paul (+)
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Joined: May 28th, 2003, 6:14 pm

March 16th, 2010, 12:44 pm #5

but we all know that theory and reality are often different.

I'm a little skeptical of some of the BC values given in Chairgun, but my understanding is that BC can vary quite a bit from gun to gun and as the velocity changes, so it could be that they're correct at least some of the time.

According to Chairgun, the JSB heavies have a BC of 0.031, while CP heavies are 0.026. By way of comparison, .22 JSB 15.9's also have a BC of 0.031 while .22 Kodiaks are 0.036.

That was what got me thinking seriously about this. I frequently shoot my .22 S410 out to 100 yards and I use 15.9 grain JSB's. At that distance I find that consistency is a major factor and the difference in trajectory from the power curve becomes very apparent. It seems that a .177 should be able to get more consistent shots per charge and should have an easier time pushing the pellets up into the mid 900's. The big question I suppose is whether the theory bears out in practice. If it does, a .177 M-rod shooting JSB heavies in the 950-1000 range should have a ballistic advantage and a wind bucking advantage over a .22 S410 shooting JSB 15.9's at 930 fps.
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VYD
Joined: January 25th, 2007, 7:49 pm

March 16th, 2010, 12:45 pm #6

I noticed looking through the Chairgun pellet data base that .177 JSB heavies have a 0.031 BC. For a .177, that's high...real high. In fact it's higher than most .22 and .25 pellets. Now, that got me thinking, most PCP's should be able to easily shoot them in the upper 900's, and with that small a projectile I should be able to get lots of very consistent shots.

I'm thinking that a .177 Marauder sounds like just the ticket for some serious long range precision plinking, (out to 100+ yards). I'm thinking I might run it off a pony bottle for extra convenience and consistency. I might regulate it too, but I already have the pony bottle, so that's an easy option. The affordability of the pellets and the mags makes this look very attractive.
that my .177 HW100 is no good at that range. I gave it a lesson on manners

10.6 Kodiak at 22 FPE @ muzzle is a serious flat shooting pill. It gets there at no time with virtually no wind drift on a good day...
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Joined: February 28th, 2010, 12:24 am

March 16th, 2010, 1:04 pm #7

I noticed looking through the Chairgun pellet data base that .177 JSB heavies have a 0.031 BC. For a .177, that's high...real high. In fact it's higher than most .22 and .25 pellets. Now, that got me thinking, most PCP's should be able to easily shoot them in the upper 900's, and with that small a projectile I should be able to get lots of very consistent shots.

I'm thinking that a .177 Marauder sounds like just the ticket for some serious long range precision plinking, (out to 100+ yards). I'm thinking I might run it off a pony bottle for extra convenience and consistency. I might regulate it too, but I already have the pony bottle, so that's an easy option. The affordability of the pellets and the mags makes this look very attractive.
and I have used it mostly up until just 9 years ago . Prior to that I only used .177's and they killed just as well as a .22 all those many years , for many people on the same game . Shot placement as you know is most important anywayz , not just FPE or FPS .
Rabbits die at 5 to 7 FPE , Sqirrels at 7 to 9 FPE , dead is dead , nuff said .
For flat shooting , the .177 is hard to beat . Try some RWS Super Magnum Diabolos some time . If you think Meaisterkuglens shoot good adn your gun likesa littel ehavier pellet, they are hard to beat for an accurate Diabolo .

Cheers , RWS-Kelly

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Joined: June 17th, 2009, 3:55 am

March 16th, 2010, 1:08 pm #8

that my .177 HW100 is no good at that range. I gave it a lesson on manners

10.6 Kodiak at 22 FPE @ muzzle is a serious flat shooting pill. It gets there at no time with virtually no wind drift on a good day...
VYD I think solved it 177 it is!!
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Joined: November 22nd, 2005, 9:28 pm

March 16th, 2010, 1:37 pm #9

that my .177 HW100 is no good at that range. I gave it a lesson on manners

10.6 Kodiak at 22 FPE @ muzzle is a serious flat shooting pill. It gets there at no time with virtually no wind drift on a good day...
I've got a .177 Rapid That Dutch and ...nuts, can't remember his name, used to be on this forum all the time shot. One of them nailed a crow with it at over 100 yards before I owned it. That's the one with the DaveG and FX tube.

Theory says BC, not mass determines drift. It doesn't seem right, but that's theory.

One day I will have to compare it to a .22 (yeah, like I have time for that). AFTER the Willys gets done, along with the garage, the........

Joe Brancato
http://www.hamcontact.com/airgun/HoseAssembly/
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Joined: June 21st, 2006, 10:40 am

March 16th, 2010, 1:48 pm #10

and I have used it mostly up until just 9 years ago . Prior to that I only used .177's and they killed just as well as a .22 all those many years , for many people on the same game . Shot placement as you know is most important anywayz , not just FPE or FPS .
Rabbits die at 5 to 7 FPE , Sqirrels at 7 to 9 FPE , dead is dead , nuff said .
For flat shooting , the .177 is hard to beat . Try some RWS Super Magnum Diabolos some time . If you think Meaisterkuglens shoot good adn your gun likesa littel ehavier pellet, they are hard to beat for an accurate Diabolo .

Cheers , RWS-Kelly
once you live in a permanent windy environment you see some of its short comings , having a heavy 0177 (11grain or so) going at 900+ is great . I am certainly no expert but it seems that you need 20 grains or more at velocities of above 850 to really reach out when wind is present.I am still a huge fan of the 177 , always have been . One of my preferred solutions for pest control out to 40 yards or so is the HN wadcutters at 8-900 pfs.
"somebody has to take the high road..."
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