rust control

rust control

Duncan
Duncan

October 21st, 2008, 3:15 pm #1

I've had limited success with rust control.

Current practice is
1. Cut out rusty metal.
2. Weld in new metal.
3. Spray standard primer on the bare metal.
4. Apply standard body filler.
5. Shape the filler.
6. Spray three or four coats of standard primer.
7. Lightly rub the primer
8. Spray two coats of top coat.

I've been told that I should use a non-porous filler direct to the metalwork (maybe one of those with metal in it?) to get the shape - then finish the shape with normal filler.

I thought a primer direct to bare metal would make the metal waterproof but apparently primer is not water proof?

Perhaps what is happening is that the filler is cracking or I'm not using enough top coat and the water is getting into the porous filler and is rusting the metal, behind the filler.

Bottom line is what is the correct procedure?
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Joined: December 21st, 2007, 5:11 pm

October 21st, 2008, 3:18 pm #2

Might want to go with Epoxy Primer on bare metal.

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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 9:00 pm

October 21st, 2008, 3:57 pm #3

I've had limited success with rust control.

Current practice is
1. Cut out rusty metal.
2. Weld in new metal.
3. Spray standard primer on the bare metal.
4. Apply standard body filler.
5. Shape the filler.
6. Spray three or four coats of standard primer.
7. Lightly rub the primer
8. Spray two coats of top coat.

I've been told that I should use a non-porous filler direct to the metalwork (maybe one of those with metal in it?) to get the shape - then finish the shape with normal filler.

I thought a primer direct to bare metal would make the metal waterproof but apparently primer is not water proof?

Perhaps what is happening is that the filler is cracking or I'm not using enough top coat and the water is getting into the porous filler and is rusting the metal, behind the filler.

Bottom line is what is the correct procedure?
I'm sure there are several ways to rust-proof, or should I say rust-resist.
My method is to use an enchant on bare metal to remove any hint of rust, then spray with a self-etching primer, light sand, (and spray again if necessary) then apply fillers to pits, (if necessary) light prime over that (for consistancy) then apply the base and top coats. A bit of extra work but the results seem to last.

Is an X1/9 ever really rust-proof?

Bob Brown
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Joined: July 19th, 2007, 6:15 pm

October 21st, 2008, 6:27 pm #4

I've had limited success with rust control.

Current practice is
1. Cut out rusty metal.
2. Weld in new metal.
3. Spray standard primer on the bare metal.
4. Apply standard body filler.
5. Shape the filler.
6. Spray three or four coats of standard primer.
7. Lightly rub the primer
8. Spray two coats of top coat.

I've been told that I should use a non-porous filler direct to the metalwork (maybe one of those with metal in it?) to get the shape - then finish the shape with normal filler.

I thought a primer direct to bare metal would make the metal waterproof but apparently primer is not water proof?

Perhaps what is happening is that the filler is cracking or I'm not using enough top coat and the water is getting into the porous filler and is rusting the metal, behind the filler.

Bottom line is what is the correct procedure?
http://www.por15.com/
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lappy
lappy

October 21st, 2008, 9:27 pm #5

I've had limited success with rust control.

Current practice is
1. Cut out rusty metal.
2. Weld in new metal.
3. Spray standard primer on the bare metal.
4. Apply standard body filler.
5. Shape the filler.
6. Spray three or four coats of standard primer.
7. Lightly rub the primer
8. Spray two coats of top coat.

I've been told that I should use a non-porous filler direct to the metalwork (maybe one of those with metal in it?) to get the shape - then finish the shape with normal filler.

I thought a primer direct to bare metal would make the metal waterproof but apparently primer is not water proof?

Perhaps what is happening is that the filler is cracking or I'm not using enough top coat and the water is getting into the porous filler and is rusting the metal, behind the filler.

Bottom line is what is the correct procedure?
to get the metal as clean as you can, wire brush rotary wheel or soda blast etc, then get a epoxy primer onto the surface as soon as you possibly can. Bare metal will start to corrode straight away - although you may not be able to see it. Also - resist the temptation to run your hands over the bare metal before you prime it - the greases and acids in your skin will contaminate the surface.
Lappy.
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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 9:00 pm

October 21st, 2008, 9:48 pm #6

Where did you get those "stainless looking" compression tubes you used (in a picture you previously posted on XWeb)
that assists in lifting up the front bonnet? I'd like to get a set of those, so supplier and part number (with pressure
rating) would be most helpfull if you can share it. Thanks in advance!

Bob Brown
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MikeMittelstead/Oregon
MikeMittelstead/Oregon

October 21st, 2008, 10:32 pm #7

to get the metal as clean as you can, wire brush rotary wheel or soda blast etc, then get a epoxy primer onto the surface as soon as you possibly can. Bare metal will start to corrode straight away - although you may not be able to see it. Also - resist the temptation to run your hands over the bare metal before you prime it - the greases and acids in your skin will contaminate the surface.
Lappy.
...they tend to "burnish" the remaining rust.
Might look like area is clean,
but hit it with phosphoric acid,
and rust will be exposed.

Variety of small grinding stones, scraping, chiseling,
even a small engraver can be used to remove more rust.
Multiple passes with phosphoric acid will facilitate
mechanical removal, and neutralize the specks
that remain...which can then be sealed with epoxy primer.

I don't like the thought of leaving any scabby rust.
None of the neutralizers penetrate very deep.
Under hardshell of blackoxide, cancer remains.
Growth arrested while sealed from oxygen,
but breached seal means the demon returns.
It's a workaround to doing a through job.
Which is fine for those who don't mind.
I've learned I can't do less than best effort.

Or sandblasting really gets the rust gone,
but makes a mess...and tends to permeate every orifice.
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Lappy
Lappy

October 22nd, 2008, 2:29 am #8

Where did you get those "stainless looking" compression tubes you used (in a picture you previously posted on XWeb)
that assists in lifting up the front bonnet? I'd like to get a set of those, so supplier and part number (with pressure
rating) would be most helpfull if you can share it. Thanks in advance!

Bob Brown
They are made here in Australia Bob, Company is called Australian gas springs and the product is lifteasy.
www.lifteasy.com
they are 316 stainless, 15mm barrel with 6mm shaft from memory about 40lbs.
I've actually put them on the engine lid and rear boot - they work great. Price about $35.00 and they have all the hardware and brackets you need. If you have no luck, let me know and I can pick some up and mail them over
Regards, Lappy
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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 9:00 pm

October 22nd, 2008, 2:42 am #9

I definitely want a set, as I've not seen these here and would like to add them to my X.
They LOOK great and also seem to fit well in how you placed them.

I'll let you know if I have a problem. Thanks VERY MUCH for the info.

Best Regards, Bob Brown
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Ian Lawson (NZ)
Ian Lawson (NZ)

October 22nd, 2008, 3:38 am #10

They are made here in Australia Bob, Company is called Australian gas springs and the product is lifteasy.
www.lifteasy.com
they are 316 stainless, 15mm barrel with 6mm shaft from memory about 40lbs.
I've actually put them on the engine lid and rear boot - they work great. Price about $35.00 and they have all the hardware and brackets you need. If you have no luck, let me know and I can pick some up and mail them over
Regards, Lappy
Hi Lappy, do those gas struts get in the way at all when you want to store the targa roof in the front trunk?

I load the roof into the trunk, usually from the driver's side (RHD), and it kinda looks like that side strut might restrict this access to the trunk. Have you noticed this at all?

Certainly nice looking struts, and well priced too!

cheers, Ian - NZ

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