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rossofozini
rossofozini

August 14th, 2008, 11:07 am #1

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AngleT
AngleT

August 14th, 2008, 11:25 am #2

interesting engine hood prop he has there too...
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htf
Joined: May 5th, 2001, 4:29 pm

August 14th, 2008, 3:13 pm #3

Thanks for the idea.


HaXD
Herzel, in Israel

WhiteX
The late Green '85 X1/9
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Joe F
Joe F

August 14th, 2008, 3:24 pm #4

interesting engine hood prop he has there too...
The hood prop is interesting, but because it streaches across the engine bay, I think it would be in the way most of the time, even if it was off to one side.

Just my humble opine

Joe F
87 Bert
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Joined: May 21st, 2002, 4:25 am

August 14th, 2008, 4:15 pm #5

used in so many electric cars.I understand a few pro mechanics have been killed under the hood of production hybrids.Why not stick with 12 volts?
Last edited by clasicalgas on August 14th, 2008, 4:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joe F
Joe F

August 14th, 2008, 5:08 pm #6

If your question was serious, here is a serious answer.

Because Force=Mass x Acceleration (F=MA) is the same as Volts = Resistance x Amps (V=RI) where Force=Volts and Mass=Resistance. The more mass you have (R) the more Force (V) you need to produce a constant acceleration.

To move a ton and a half you need either a powerful voltage source or a powerful current source. It is easier to build a portable renewable power source (batteries).

12 volts just does not supply enough force to move a ton and a half at a reasonable acceleration.

I work around 600VDC vehicles: public transit busses, trolleys and passenger trains and yes, you must adapt to a different environment than you have with an internal combustion engine.

This is the face of progress...

BTW, 600VDC public transit vehicles date back to the 1920's

Joe F
87 Bert
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Joined: August 7th, 2006, 3:12 pm

August 14th, 2008, 5:27 pm #7

used in so many electric cars.I understand a few pro mechanics have been killed under the hood of production hybrids.Why not stick with 12 volts?
On paper you could power an electric car with 12 volts... however, your voltage source would have to be able to supply 1000+ amps (Power = volts x amps)... its not likely you would find anything in the real work that could do that (at least something compact and mobile). Plus all the "drivetrain" wiring in the car, with all its connections and control hardware would have to be able to handle that current as well... with little loss. You'd be hard pressed to find that in the real world as well.

If you up the voltage to a couple (or several) hundred volts, you're now only talking tens of amps... or maybe a 100 or so... Much easier to work with...

Jim W. (in the Northeast)
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classicalgas
classicalgas

August 14th, 2008, 9:18 pm #8

Since most use a set of 12v batteries,running them in series ups the voltage and reduces the amps,what's the difference if run parallel ..you drop the volts and up the amps....same power source both ways...(or have I got that backwards?)
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rick
rick

August 14th, 2008, 11:24 pm #9

You up the amps then you up the size of things = $
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Joined: May 21st, 2002, 4:25 am

August 15th, 2008, 12:12 am #10

controllers? Makes sense...I had this vague memory that the 27 volt systems on old military planes allowed smaller,lighter motors for the pneumatic and hydraulic pumps.(compared to 12 volt)
Still,in practical terms wouldn't the tradeoff seem worthwhile...more weight in return for very safe voltage levels? (for the DIY builder/mechanic)
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