Hey Mac...what are you using to change the graphics and

Hey Mac...what are you using to change the graphics and

Mark in Syracuse
Mark in Syracuse

February 15th, 2005, 5:52 pm #1

how difficult is it? I use Autocad to generate fabrication and machining drawings but I do not have much hands on with graphics programs. I have toyed with a photoshop trial version and paint programs as well as a graphics enhancement program that came with my plustek scanner.

Your graphics changes look good and I am interested in how you achieved them. I would like to try my hand at it. I am a mechanical designer, I started out in Architecture then moved into mechanical design and now I am involved in the design of rotating machinery (multi-stage centrifugal turbines otherwise know as blowers and exhausters) Actually, I started a business a few years ago and I manufacture large multi-stage centrifugals that are used in industrial central vacuum systems and other processes that require air and gas pressure.

I can also see a use for this in my business so any help would be appreciated. Thanks

I would like to also try my hand at some designs for a future X.

Mark
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 15th, 2005, 9:35 pm #2

It is interesting the kind of people who take an interest in this stuff!

I happen to be an Electro-Mechanical Engineering Tech (for those who don't know what that is, it's basically a degreed Engineer's right hand man, or a would-be Engineer who just has not finished his BA yet). Actually, before 9/11, I was classified as an "Engineer by Merit" which meant that I was qualified to be a full fledged Engineer based solely on 2 AAs and some valuable work experience (I worked in R&D for Raytheon, one of the world's largest defense contractors, some job for a pacifist!). Boy, those days are GONE! Since 9/11, even degreed Engineers are now scrapping for MY jobs so it's back to being a lowly tech for me until I can go back to college...

Anyway, back on topic, in order to create one of these renderings from scratch, you would be best off using one of those 3D graphics programs like Alias or 3DStudio etc. Since all I am doing is modifying the existing graphics that IED released, I can do that just using things like Photoshop and the simple "MS Paint" when working at a low level with bitmaps. I have a kind of unique / quirky way of doing this. Most folks I know would never touch MS Paint again if they had Photoshop, but I actually find some tasks go better using the simple little Paint program, then do the fancier stuff in Photoshop. So that's what I am doing. Also I used another Adobe program, called ImageReady, to do the gif animation. I'm about to revise the headlight gif to put a clear opening in the sliding covers, for "flash-to-pass" or daytime running etc. I also sometimes use Microsoft Photo Editor for doing background transparencies on gifs, since my photoshop filter for that got corrupted a while back and I've been too lazy to fix it.

So that's what I have been using so far. I am thinking about trying my hand in one of those serious 3D rendering programs though, if we work up some ideas that get really beautiful enough to build our own renderings up from scratch. So far, bitmapping and photoshopping the originals to our whims is working out ok

No matter what programs you use, it just takes a little practice to develop a particular way of going about things that suits you, so my best advice would be to just get your hands on Photoshop and MS Paint, grab an image, and just start playing around with it in your free time.

Peace, -Mac
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Joined: March 19th, 2004, 6:23 pm

February 16th, 2005, 1:22 am #3

Katia??

or is it Catia?!? can't remember... really cool...

Solid Works is kinda neat too..

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Joined: February 15th, 2005, 3:35 am

February 16th, 2005, 4:53 am #4

Very very expensive software but very powerful and widely used in industry (automotive and aerospace). I have some experience with uesing it and have ready accsess to it at the college I attend as well as ProE which I have a student copy on my compter. It is much cheaper software ~5 grand than catia but very powerful as well. It is also commonly used in industry and quite powerful as well. Also I know of a place you can get a two year trial version for $200 the only draw back is anything you print it will say you don't have the full version all around the edges. But great to learn on. catia has very powerful sweep comands which make createing wings and car bodys easy. Personaly though I prefer working with foam for body design.
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Joined: February 15th, 2005, 3:35 am

February 16th, 2005, 5:10 am #5

how difficult is it? I use Autocad to generate fabrication and machining drawings but I do not have much hands on with graphics programs. I have toyed with a photoshop trial version and paint programs as well as a graphics enhancement program that came with my plustek scanner.

Your graphics changes look good and I am interested in how you achieved them. I would like to try my hand at it. I am a mechanical designer, I started out in Architecture then moved into mechanical design and now I am involved in the design of rotating machinery (multi-stage centrifugal turbines otherwise know as blowers and exhausters) Actually, I started a business a few years ago and I manufacture large multi-stage centrifugals that are used in industrial central vacuum systems and other processes that require air and gas pressure.

I can also see a use for this in my business so any help would be appreciated. Thanks

I would like to also try my hand at some designs for a future X.

Mark
It is very powerful and useful. Catia is overkill and auto cad Sucks. I interend at a civil enginieering firm and used auto cad map It is horibly dificult and non user friendly and sucks in 3d. but I will admit it is good for civil engineering firms. I have also used Catia, Pro Engineer and Rino. Pro E is in my oppinion the best deal. you can do FEA produce drawings, assembalies, cnc code and all sorts of stuff I don't know about. Oh and you can get a full professional demo version for $200 or $250 at journeyed.com that lasts two years. Before you invest 5 grand in the full version. Or you can order the tutorial (which I recomend) for 50 and it comes with a 60 day trial version.
My two cents
Chase
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Mark in Syracuse
Mark in Syracuse

February 16th, 2005, 10:32 am #6

A few years back the company I worked for had a PRO E demo in our office. Yes it is powerful but the cost did not justify our using it over Autocad. Hell, some of our fab drawings were still on linen, dating way back.

The cost per station was $80,000, there were 15 people in engineering. Just not worth the money for us at that time.

I am fully aware of the power of Pro E but I must go with a much cheaper software program.

Thanks
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Joined: March 19th, 2004, 6:23 pm

February 17th, 2005, 1:27 am #7

Very very expensive software but very powerful and widely used in industry (automotive and aerospace). I have some experience with uesing it and have ready accsess to it at the college I attend as well as ProE which I have a student copy on my compter. It is much cheaper software ~5 grand than catia but very powerful as well. It is also commonly used in industry and quite powerful as well. Also I know of a place you can get a two year trial version for $200 the only draw back is anything you print it will say you don't have the full version all around the edges. But great to learn on. catia has very powerful sweep comands which make createing wings and car bodys easy. Personaly though I prefer working with foam for body design.
My friend uses foam... a wooden buck for patterns, then foam and carve it... Epoxy them together, and voila!

He uses Catia at work on a dedicated Unix machine, neat keypad comes with it. Boy, I didn't know it was that expensive!!!

I only wish I had that talent, I am an electronics guy, working in the auto industry.... R&D, lots of fun!



http://www3.sympatico.ca/myronx19
Myron Samila
Toronto, Canada
1978 Fiat X1/9 1500cc/4spd/daily driver
1982 Fiat X1/9 1500cc FI/Faza 35/75/weekender
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Mac
Mac

February 17th, 2005, 1:34 am #8

Maybe that would help our ideas to be taken more seriously?

(Or does everyone already know that R&D Engineers are crazy anyway? )

Peace, -Mac
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Mac
Mac

February 17th, 2005, 4:16 am #9

how difficult is it? I use Autocad to generate fabrication and machining drawings but I do not have much hands on with graphics programs. I have toyed with a photoshop trial version and paint programs as well as a graphics enhancement program that came with my plustek scanner.

Your graphics changes look good and I am interested in how you achieved them. I would like to try my hand at it. I am a mechanical designer, I started out in Architecture then moved into mechanical design and now I am involved in the design of rotating machinery (multi-stage centrifugal turbines otherwise know as blowers and exhausters) Actually, I started a business a few years ago and I manufacture large multi-stage centrifugals that are used in industrial central vacuum systems and other processes that require air and gas pressure.

I can also see a use for this in my business so any help would be appreciated. Thanks

I would like to also try my hand at some designs for a future X.

Mark
Alias Studio (Personal Learning Edition):
http://www.alias.com/eng/products-servi ... ndex.shtml

V-Ray Render:
http://www.vrayrender.com/home/buyvray.html

Discreet 3DStudio:
http://www4.discreet.com/products

Peace, -Mac
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Joined: February 15th, 2005, 3:35 am

February 17th, 2005, 5:13 am #10

A few years back the company I worked for had a PRO E demo in our office. Yes it is powerful but the cost did not justify our using it over Autocad. Hell, some of our fab drawings were still on linen, dating way back.

The cost per station was $80,000, there were 15 people in engineering. Just not worth the money for us at that time.

I am fully aware of the power of Pro E but I must go with a much cheaper software program.

Thanks
80,000 is for basicly Everything in pro E includeing a lot of stuff you don't need especialy on every computer. For example does everyone have to do FEA or CNC Codeing on there own computer or at the same time. The basic suite of Pro E is striped down a bit (you can't do some fancy sweeps) but is quite a bit less but still expensive at 5 grand. I totaly respect the fact that you have and can learn Auto Cad if you can acomplish what you need to in that software that you already know it doesn't make sense to change. However for me it doesn't make any sense to learn auto cad. the testing house for PACCAR (truck builders) does not have any cnc machines in it all manual because it takes a 6th the time for a machinist to make a one off fixture or jig than it does to write the code to cnc it.
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