Has Anyone Used Camber Wedges or Camber Eccentric Bolts? (edited)

Has Anyone Used Camber Wedges or Camber Eccentric Bolts? (edited)

Joined: July 19th, 2007, 6:15 pm

August 29th, 2008, 3:46 am #1

I was at a friend's auto repair shop and I was going thru some older parts catalogs looking for anything to do with X1/9s.

Found these in the Moog suspension bits catalog:
K9757 for front, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7472

K8358 for rear, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... 607k203362

Spicer 6161048 for F & R: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7448

One's a wedge kit and the other is an ecentric bolt kit. Installation (at least from looking at my '86) of the wedge kit would require slotting the upper bolt of the two that secure the top of hub carrier/upright to the bottom of the strut tube. You'd have to slot in such a way as to remove material on the inboard side thereby allowing the top of the hub carrier/upright to move outward, pivoting on the lower bolt and correcting the typical excess negative camber.

I don't think that the eccentric bolt kit would need any slotting mods to the shock tube.

Edit: as Kevin and Damon pointed out, the wedge kits look like they accommodate the necessary movement by using a smaller diameter bolt for the upper hole.

If the friction of the two joining pieces (upright and strut tube ears) generated by the bolt's clamping/compression force is what keeps the connection together, then I don't see the problem with the smaller diameter bolt. If the bolt works by shear, then the smaller diameter would be a major issue.
Last edited by FlyerFanDan on August 29th, 2008, 1:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Kevin Cozzo
Kevin Cozzo

August 29th, 2008, 7:12 am #2

actually I think with the wedge kit, you use a smaller bolt so you don't have to slot anything, the smaller diameter bolt allows the strut to tilt, until you cram the wedge between the strut and the knuckle, and re tighten the bolt. I had a Fiat mechanic frown upon this on my car years ago, his thinking was the smaller diameter bolt might be too weak. I ended up finding the Right bolts and replacing them until I found another type of camber kit, Kevin
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Joined: August 6th, 2005, 6:03 pm

August 29th, 2008, 12:44 pm #3

I was at a friend's auto repair shop and I was going thru some older parts catalogs looking for anything to do with X1/9s.

Found these in the Moog suspension bits catalog:
K9757 for front, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7472

K8358 for rear, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... 607k203362

Spicer 6161048 for F & R: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7448

One's a wedge kit and the other is an ecentric bolt kit. Installation (at least from looking at my '86) of the wedge kit would require slotting the upper bolt of the two that secure the top of hub carrier/upright to the bottom of the strut tube. You'd have to slot in such a way as to remove material on the inboard side thereby allowing the top of the hub carrier/upright to move outward, pivoting on the lower bolt and correcting the typical excess negative camber.

I don't think that the eccentric bolt kit would need any slotting mods to the shock tube.

Edit: as Kevin and Damon pointed out, the wedge kits look like they accommodate the necessary movement by using a smaller diameter bolt for the upper hole.

If the friction of the two joining pieces (upright and strut tube ears) generated by the bolt's clamping/compression force is what keeps the connection together, then I don't see the problem with the smaller diameter bolt. If the bolt works by shear, then the smaller diameter would be a major issue.
With the eceentrics, if you need 3 to 5 degrees, there is no need to slot anything, simply drill the top hole out to 5/8". If you need just a little camber, you need to slot the bottom hole vertically. Just a little though, under 1/16", easy even with a dremel.

It appears that those wedges have smaller bolts up top to avoid the slot issue. Personally, I wouldnt run the smaller bolt.

I've thought about doing wedges with eccentrics and I think that would be slick. I doubt I'll have any wedges made before January though.



From the glass lined tanks of old Bertone
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Joined: August 6th, 2005, 6:03 pm

August 29th, 2008, 6:45 pm #4

I was at a friend's auto repair shop and I was going thru some older parts catalogs looking for anything to do with X1/9s.

Found these in the Moog suspension bits catalog:
K9757 for front, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7472

K8358 for rear, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... 607k203362

Spicer 6161048 for F & R: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7448

One's a wedge kit and the other is an ecentric bolt kit. Installation (at least from looking at my '86) of the wedge kit would require slotting the upper bolt of the two that secure the top of hub carrier/upright to the bottom of the strut tube. You'd have to slot in such a way as to remove material on the inboard side thereby allowing the top of the hub carrier/upright to move outward, pivoting on the lower bolt and correcting the typical excess negative camber.

I don't think that the eccentric bolt kit would need any slotting mods to the shock tube.

Edit: as Kevin and Damon pointed out, the wedge kits look like they accommodate the necessary movement by using a smaller diameter bolt for the upper hole.

If the friction of the two joining pieces (upright and strut tube ears) generated by the bolt's clamping/compression force is what keeps the connection together, then I don't see the problem with the smaller diameter bolt. If the bolt works by shear, then the smaller diameter would be a major issue.
But the larger bolt can hold more tension than the smaller one.

The stock bolt is a M10x1.25, and I assume the one supplied with the wedge is M8x1.25.

ASSUMING that the M8 is the same gade as the M10, the M8 will be ~45% weaker in tension.

Tension here will relate back to clamping force betwen the strut tube ears and the top of the knuckle (ie: what keep the camber fixed in place)

From the glass lined tanks of old Bertone
Last edited by Damonfg on August 29th, 2008, 7:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 16th, 2004, 3:48 am

August 30th, 2008, 10:46 am #5

actually I think with the wedge kit, you use a smaller bolt so you don't have to slot anything, the smaller diameter bolt allows the strut to tilt, until you cram the wedge between the strut and the knuckle, and re tighten the bolt. I had a Fiat mechanic frown upon this on my car years ago, his thinking was the smaller diameter bolt might be too weak. I ended up finding the Right bolts and replacing them until I found another type of camber kit, Kevin
before I heard about x-web . I had used smaller high grade bolts on top and was relying on the squese factor, stronger bolt, and the original bottom bolt. I was never totally comfortable with this as I hadn't seen it before. I also put a pipe clamp above the wedge to make sure it didn't pop out. Didn't have any problems. I'm defenitly no expert on these thing however.
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Joined: June 16th, 2004, 3:48 am

August 30th, 2008, 10:54 am #6

But the larger bolt can hold more tension than the smaller one.

The stock bolt is a M10x1.25, and I assume the one supplied with the wedge is M8x1.25.

ASSUMING that the M8 is the same gade as the M10, the M8 will be ~45% weaker in tension.

Tension here will relate back to clamping force betwen the strut tube ears and the top of the knuckle (ie: what keep the camber fixed in place)

From the glass lined tanks of old Bertone
,,
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Joined: October 15th, 2007, 3:50 am

August 30th, 2008, 3:27 pm #7

But the larger bolt can hold more tension than the smaller one.

The stock bolt is a M10x1.25, and I assume the one supplied with the wedge is M8x1.25.

ASSUMING that the M8 is the same gade as the M10, the M8 will be ~45% weaker in tension.

Tension here will relate back to clamping force betwen the strut tube ears and the top of the knuckle (ie: what keep the camber fixed in place)

From the glass lined tanks of old Bertone
IMO, an M8 / 5/16" dia bolt is too small for comfort on the strut to upright bolt. Given how things could happen, it would be better to enlarge the holes for an eccentric if that is the perfered camber adjuster.

Compensating for the smaller bolt diameter with a higher strength bolt has a completely different set of problems, but could be made to work and it won't be all that easy.
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Joined: August 6th, 2005, 6:03 pm

August 30th, 2008, 3:48 pm #8

.

From the glass lined tanks of old Bertone
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Jim young N.B. Canada
Jim young N.B. Canada

August 31st, 2008, 10:06 am #9

I was at a friend's auto repair shop and I was going thru some older parts catalogs looking for anything to do with X1/9s.

Found these in the Moog suspension bits catalog:
K9757 for front, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7472

K8358 for rear, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... 607k203362

Spicer 6161048 for F & R: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7448

One's a wedge kit and the other is an ecentric bolt kit. Installation (at least from looking at my '86) of the wedge kit would require slotting the upper bolt of the two that secure the top of hub carrier/upright to the bottom of the strut tube. You'd have to slot in such a way as to remove material on the inboard side thereby allowing the top of the hub carrier/upright to move outward, pivoting on the lower bolt and correcting the typical excess negative camber.

I don't think that the eccentric bolt kit would need any slotting mods to the shock tube.

Edit: as Kevin and Damon pointed out, the wedge kits look like they accommodate the necessary movement by using a smaller diameter bolt for the upper hole.

If the friction of the two joining pieces (upright and strut tube ears) generated by the bolt's clamping/compression force is what keeps the connection together, then I don't see the problem with the smaller diameter bolt. If the bolt works by shear, then the smaller diameter would be a major issue.
tried 5/16 and it didn't give enough adjustment,so I then tried the 1/4 . But this seemed to be too small a bolt and I only left them on a few months and extra caution. I took them off as this was all an experiment which I had never heard of before. I also thaught it was something simple and wondered why it hadn't been designed for something similar from factory.
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Joined: December 31st, 2006, 9:00 pm

September 1st, 2008, 5:57 am #10

I was at a friend's auto repair shop and I was going thru some older parts catalogs looking for anything to do with X1/9s.

Found these in the Moog suspension bits catalog:
K9757 for front, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7472

K8358 for rear, IIRC: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... 607k203362

Spicer 6161048 for F & R: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/raframe ... ttype=7448

One's a wedge kit and the other is an ecentric bolt kit. Installation (at least from looking at my '86) of the wedge kit would require slotting the upper bolt of the two that secure the top of hub carrier/upright to the bottom of the strut tube. You'd have to slot in such a way as to remove material on the inboard side thereby allowing the top of the hub carrier/upright to move outward, pivoting on the lower bolt and correcting the typical excess negative camber.

I don't think that the eccentric bolt kit would need any slotting mods to the shock tube.

Edit: as Kevin and Damon pointed out, the wedge kits look like they accommodate the necessary movement by using a smaller diameter bolt for the upper hole.

If the friction of the two joining pieces (upright and strut tube ears) generated by the bolt's clamping/compression force is what keeps the connection together, then I don't see the problem with the smaller diameter bolt. If the bolt works by shear, then the smaller diameter would be a major issue.
But still on the same idea Damon has mentioned, and he can make these.
The bolts used (in my photo) are from a Harley Davidson M.C. I wanted chrome plate
to go with my new shock assemblies.

Just don't tell Toni Natoli I haven't had time to put them on yet. Sheesh!

Bob Brown





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