sand blasting

sand blasting

Joined: May 29th, 2011, 2:41 pm

October 3rd, 2013, 3:28 pm #1

I've never tried sand blasting wood, but Dick Tilley used to and got that great raised grain look.
I don't recall if he burned first and just used this method to remove soot quickly, or if you can get the raised grain look by just using a gentle abrasive.

Burning and brushing takes me forever. Your toilet brush idea is awesome, Barre.

Anyone know anything about blasting wood, aside from sign making?
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rego
rego

October 3rd, 2013, 5:20 pm #2

Ive thought about investing in a sand blaster quite a bit. There are old mills here they have turned into shopping malls,they have sand blasted all the old beams and wood floors,it looks great. It brings out more grain than just burning but isn't quite as smooth. Im sure there would be so many applications for it and surprised we haven't seen more of it in our field. I would love to experiment with it. How about power washing your char away?
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Joined: October 26th, 2007, 6:19 pm

October 3rd, 2013, 10:12 pm #3

I'd try a bigger torch first. We use propane and oxy it's not too expensive and burns very hot. Grit blasting leaves a pitted surface burning leaves a smooth surface with grain texture. That being siad you can get a small grit blaster pretty cheap and give it a try. You need a pretty big air compressor to run one and they tend to clog now and then. They have different types of griits including shells and powders. Perssure washing tends to rip wood if it's too powerful. We try so hard to get the wood dry I dont think I would not want to make it wet again. Hire burner and brushers that's what I do. lol
Pinske
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lynn randall
lynn randall

October 3rd, 2013, 10:56 pm #4

A wheel wire brass brush on a drill works pretty good after a burn.It will raise the grain and give a driftwood effect.Not as fast as sand blasting.
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Joined: March 18th, 2009, 2:22 am

October 3rd, 2013, 11:06 pm #5

bears right big torch maybe a set up like this guy HAShttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efdDsba-gjk
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Joined: February 13th, 2012, 7:46 am

October 4th, 2013, 7:25 am #6

I've never tried sand blasting wood, but Dick Tilley used to and got that great raised grain look.
I don't recall if he burned first and just used this method to remove soot quickly, or if you can get the raised grain look by just using a gentle abrasive.

Burning and brushing takes me forever. Your toilet brush idea is awesome, Barre.

Anyone know anything about blasting wood, aside from sign making?
I've had some small success with using a pressure pot blaster and crushed walnut shell. I have used it in the past to strip years and years of paint off old hardwood mantles. On green pine it has a varied effect, on dried pine, with the right technique you create a driftwood effect.
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Carrie
Carrie

October 4th, 2013, 11:57 am #7

I've never tried sand blasting wood, but Dick Tilley used to and got that great raised grain look.
I don't recall if he burned first and just used this method to remove soot quickly, or if you can get the raised grain look by just using a gentle abrasive.

Burning and brushing takes me forever. Your toilet brush idea is awesome, Barre.

Anyone know anything about blasting wood, aside from sign making?
Hi Cheryl

To answer your question about Dick's sand blasting - yes he used a propane torch first. Dick had to use the services of a commercial sand blaster for medical reasons - (which he's already told us about on the forums) - to avoid inhaling dust. It worked very well.

I like soda blasting though. A mobile unit came to my pit and soda blasted (baking powder) which is environmentally friendly, dissolves harmlessly into the waterways. The soda crystals explode on impact and leave a good finish and some skill is needed by the operator not to overblast. Hardwoods do well but some softwoods like redwood can loose detail.

Hope this helps.
Carrie
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Joined: May 29th, 2011, 2:41 pm

October 4th, 2013, 3:31 pm #8

I think what brought this to mind was that Badger Airbrush makes a mini sandblaster for etching glass and wood. I'm talking literally pint size. Too small for the scale of work Barre does, but it might have a place with smaller carvings or hard to reach places.

Hmmm...I never would have thought of using a pressure washer. I do have one.

Nice to see you on here Lynn. You have always been a great inspiration to me. I use a brass wire wheel on a drill to create fine fur on fawns and other such beasts. I'm sure they must come in different gauges so I don't cut into the wood.

I mostly use white pine that's pretty dry.

That reminds me, Copas made a comment on Facebook about a nylon brush that is impregnated with grit. Osborne brush I think it was called?
Expensive, but sounds interesting because it could get into the grooves of the grain, whereas a Sand O Flex would just smooth it all off.

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Joined: May 29th, 2011, 2:41 pm

October 4th, 2013, 3:33 pm #9

What happens with the blasting material you use? I can see soda dissolving, but what about other abrasives? Maybe it doesn't add up much, I've never seen it done, but I envision abrasive all over the place. :O
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Joined: March 18th, 2009, 2:22 am

October 4th, 2013, 8:49 pm #10

http://www.zorotools.com/g/00114526/k-G ... mpaign=PLA I used to blast aluminum with glass beads superchargers and tunnel rams before gas hit 4 bucks a gallon
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