Moderators: Moderators, Administrator

Egypt election results show Islamists the winners

Joined: August 8th, 2007, 11:59 pm

December 3rd, 2011, 11:25 am #1

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 8th, 2007, 11:59 pm

December 3rd, 2011, 11:27 am #2

RIP Egypt. The world will soon realize the value of Hosni Mubarak (PBUH).
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 10th, 2011, 4:30 pm

December 3rd, 2011, 11:32 am #3

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Oh phuck off you retard.

<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="315"></embed></object>

Wat alle clubs in nederland over amsterdam denken......
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 20th, 2005, 4:50 am

December 3rd, 2011, 12:46 pm #4

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Idiot liberals what did they think? Islamist will give them democracy up the *** now. Pure self ownage.



"One day my mortal body will turn to dust, but the Turkish Republic will stand forever." M. Kemal Ataturk
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 17th, 2005, 7:30 pm

December 3rd, 2011, 9:28 pm #5

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
If by having the Islamist in power means they are going to go backwards and have a Saudi or Iranian style government they they get what they deserve for their stupidity.

I am sure there is a provision that revokes total power to elected officials to prevent a Taliban dictatorship coming to power.

For the good of progress and moving forward it will hopefully turn into a secular ,Turkey style government that has laws for all instead of drawing religion-based backwardness. It is one thing to be muslim it is another to force an entire population to follow one breed of religion. All that will do is move people further from their god-kings.

I dont believe Egytians are stupid enough to want a religious dictatorship to take their freedom away because it offends some cleric in power.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 10th, 2011, 4:30 pm

December 3rd, 2011, 10:38 pm #6

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Phuck Turkey and your gay government. Shove that securalism up a Jews arse. We don't want it. I love this news haha . It is soooooo good. Good for the future. Infidels are bound to die one day. I hope arms smuggels will go to Gaza like crazy. It's time for rockets to fall and a million Israelites to seek the bunkers again.

<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="315"></embed></object>


Lolololo so troll. 3:14 look at that map.

<object width="420" height="315"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="420" height="315"></embed></object>

YA HEZBOLLAH! I love this hahaha. Nasrallah! Moqtada al sadr! THE SHIA WILL DESTROY THE YAHOODI KAHLBS.

<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="315"></embed></object>

Wat alle clubs in nederland over amsterdam denken......
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 16th, 2005, 6:07 am

December 3rd, 2011, 11:30 pm #7

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Lol, the Iranian gov was right. The revolutions were inspired by the Islamic revolution in Iran. Every single country is voting for an Islamic government, thus being an Islamic revolution.

I can't beleive Arabs are so uneducated and can't see what's happening in " Islamic" countires around them.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 10th, 2011, 4:30 pm

December 3rd, 2011, 11:45 pm #8

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Yeah man,Benzeen you are right. Man,I was reading that I was like yeah wow so right. Hey,lets go back and live under a puppet secular dictator. Yeah man I mean totally. It would be so good. Such a honerable life we would have. I totally agree with you. Wait,let me go get my dusty old torah and read it abit. Sleep with it under my pillow. I am so heading towards the straight path man,thanks for opening my eyes.



<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="315"></embed></object>

Wat alle clubs in nederland over amsterdam denken......
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 27th, 2008, 2:35 pm

December 4th, 2011, 4:48 am #9

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
kuffardom westrns ratdes started whinings agian. its egyptian ummah brotherhoods business to returning to truth path methods of islamic or not.

beside, salafi and ikhwan forming two separate political bloc.

also, what these kuffar ratdes writings with restriction of freedom blah blah. which where place not restricting freedom? even WAFF contain rule - inclusive of rule regulation mean restriction of freedom by default. dumby kuffardom.

===========================================
I am old Christiankiller
Sorry for offensive to our good religion christian brothers
I am not hating christians
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 10th, 2011, 4:30 pm

December 4th, 2011, 12:12 pm #10

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
http://kavkazcenter.com/eng/content/201 ... 5456.shtml

Turkey is pissing the hell out of muslims. Is it a coincidence so many have threatened it already?. Make the process complete. Change your flag put ataturk on it and fully focus on kemalism. Leave Islam out of it than.

<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="315"></embed></object>

Wat alle clubs in nederland over amsterdam denken......
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 17th, 2005, 7:30 pm

December 4th, 2011, 1:16 pm #11

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Go ahead and have your Islamic hardon as you type from a free western country and wish backwardness for your homelands.

A waste of air trying to debate with you armchair jihadis all you know is allah allah allah. like a middle-eastern redneck.

You radical muslims living off the west are a fuking discrace and nasty. I hope you soon get the wars you wish for, I wanna see some Jihadi-Joes burn.

Just a question, will you be returning to the holy land for the upcoming BBQ?

To make it clear , I have no offence or problem with modern secular and progressive minded muslims , my beef is with the enemy that lives among us.

One thing is clear is that the rise of the sunni MB in Egypt and Syria will severly limit the power sphere of Irans Shiite influence and reduce the threat of Hizbullah and even now Hamas will be dumping Iran. Hizbo will be cut off.

Good job.
Last edited by Stahlhelm1 on December 4th, 2011, 1:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 17th, 2005, 7:30 pm

December 4th, 2011, 3:17 pm #12

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
I would say that the Arab spring was more inspired by irans failed green revolution to try to bring down the mullah dictators/oppressors. Iran has tread a fine line by suporting the end of dictators in other countries while smashing its own people in their attempt for freedom and suporting the criminal Assad's dictatorship. Hipocrits they are.

The middle-east will now be set back another 10 years with muslim infighting and trying to form governments based on an imaginary skyman. Religious governments are a joke.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 17th, 2011, 6:05 pm

December 4th, 2011, 3:32 pm #13

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Amazingly people don't learn from each other's mistake or from history. If there are no cheating in the elections, then this IS what people want and they have no choice but to go through the same process that people of Iran went through and still are going through. Mubarak was actually wrong in not giving them what they want, that too doesn't work.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 18th, 2007, 7:19 pm

December 4th, 2011, 9:39 pm #14

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Once a professor told me that human intelligence and enlightenment have grown exponential since the dark ages. But he finished saying that unfortunately ignorance an stupidity have grown with an almost double exponential. We are doomed for another clash of civilizations ... I hope the force and the B2's will be with us.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 10th, 2011, 4:30 pm

December 4th, 2011, 10:28 pm #15

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
<object width="420" height="315"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="420" height="315"></embed></object>

So beast. The handshake haha damn gangster. I am happy for the Islamists in Egypt. Hope the alliance between Iran and Egypt becomes very huge. No one would dare to attack us. From the infidels of Israel to the puppets of Turkey. Are you a muslim? fine join our struggle,if not,get out of the way this might get ugly

<object width="560" height="315"><param name="movie" value=""></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="560" height="315"></embed></object>

Wat alle clubs in nederland over amsterdam denken......
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: October 21st, 2009, 10:59 pm

December 4th, 2011, 11:14 pm #16

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Ignore this moron..... he doesn't get the attention he needs at home so he comes here
for any human communication.

Besides, he's dumber than a tree stump, and is a ward of the state... you know, a "special man-child."



----------------
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 17th, 2005, 7:30 pm

December 5th, 2011, 3:34 am #17

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Yes ,he is special Elwapo - special Ed.

I have tried to discuss with his special type many times before. They mostly type from free countries that allow them to spout such ignorance. I think being from a muslim family it is a form of youth rebellion to be "radical" for young western muslims. Why cant he just go get drunk and laid like normal kids?

I just dont get the "allah affection". It is so 14th century.

I have an interest in science and study of the universe, this is my godhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VMYhaYCR ... ideo_title

When looking at the stars we realize how insignificant we are and how big the univers we live in is. Allah and praying 5 times a day just doesnt cut it.

In other news:

al-Nur party is expected to take 20% of the vote. They dream of another Suadi Arabia like country. Egypt is going to get fuked by a goat. Yet another muslim country that will suffer massive brain-drain when all the smart people that make money leave and all you have left is ignorance. Next they will impose tents as dress-code for women

I still hold out that Egypt makes a smart move a stays secular. There are millions of christians there that are going to get crushed by the intollerant religion of peace that will make them second class dhimmi.

Man a what world we live in.

Are there any Egyptian members that can give us another view of what is happening on the ground there?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: August 16th, 2011, 10:33 pm

December 5th, 2011, 4:01 am #18

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
So beast. The handshake haha damn gangster. I am happy for the Islamists in Egypt. Hope the alliance between Iran and Egypt becomes very huge. No one would dare to attack us. From the infidels of Israel to the puppets of Turkey. Are you a muslim? fine join our struggle,if not,get out of the way this might get ugly


Egypt has really nothing to offer us but we can production sites for our goods (like autos, home appliances, food companies, etc) and also exporting oil/gas products
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: July 17th, 2005, 7:30 pm

December 5th, 2011, 4:26 am #19

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
You do realize that there will be no "unity" for sunni MB and shiite mullahs. They hate each other as much as they hate western freedoms.

Hence the power struggle when MB takes Syria from Iran.

Do you get it now?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: April 2nd, 2005, 6:53 am

December 5th, 2011, 6:16 am #20

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Young people, like those in that Iranian green movement, brought down Mubarak...

... these Islamist types may have been among them, but I'd venture to guess those same young people by and large are finding what usually happens to revolutions now happening to them.

The thing is, can you really say that this is turning out to be a "stolen" revolution if it's the result of the exercise of democratic rights? I saw an interview of the "richest man in Egypt" (sorry, forgot his name) the other day and his complaint was that the only parties who were ready for an election were the religious ones. The Brotherhood because it was always there and organized. The Salafists because of money from Saudi Arabia and Oman.

The article up top says 61% of the electorate voted (pretty good by Western standards, which is kind of pathetic on a number of levels.) How would the Salafists do if the turnout was higher?

Yeah, this idea that a Salafist "Islamist Republic of Egypt" and the Islamic Republic of Iran would be natural allies is really rather silly. No one kills Muslims like other Muslims.

Regards

[/IMG]
Quote
Like
Share