Egypt election results show Islamists the winners

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Joined: October 18th, 2007, 7:19 pm

December 5th, 2011, 7:05 am #21

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
"So beast. The handshake haha damn gangster. I am happy for the Islamists in Egypt. Hope the alliance between Iran and Egypt becomes very huge. No one would dare to attack us. From the infidels of Israel to the puppets of Turkey. Are you a muslim? fine join our struggle,if not,get out of the way this might get ugly"

lets see Egypt trying to close the channel or block it to some countries and we shall see if no one attacks you.

You will never get the prosperity of Turkey .... Egypt is doomed to fail.
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Joined: October 20th, 2005, 4:50 am

December 5th, 2011, 7:37 am #22

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
"The thing is, can you really say that this is turning out to be a "stolen" revolution if it's the result of the exercise of democratic rights? "

The election itself won't make it a stolen revolution but what happens after the Islamist government comes into power will be. Salafists already openly state they want sharia law and enforcement of their own version of Islam.

Brotherhood is itself Islamist and they will have %60 of seats in the parliament, 2/3 of the seats and you can change constitution and make Egypt Islamic republic.

And we know how democratic and free other Islamic republics are. I would hate to be Christian in Egypt now.

Most people opposed Mubarek on low minimum wages, inflation, poor economic conditions and corruption. It was only a small group of liberals that embraced value of democracy and human rights and freedom. They will end up getting none of it.



"One day my mortal body will turn to dust, but the Turkish Republic will stand forever." M. Kemal Ataturk
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Joined: September 27th, 2008, 2:35 pm

December 5th, 2011, 8:50 am #23

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
stupids dumby kafier rat stay out of egyptians muslim matters. go kill urself if u likeds. if u kuffar rat dont implement shariah in ur own countrieds where muslims being minority then why egyptian should not implementings shariah in own country where muslims being majority?

dumb kuffar ratdes who dont even knowing own parents identieids babbling BS.

STFU

===========================================
I am old Christiankiller
Sorry for offensive to our good religion christian brothers
I am not hating christians
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Joined: July 10th, 2011, 4:30 pm

December 5th, 2011, 4:06 pm #24

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
^^ Exactly. In other words. THEY HAVE BEEN CHOSEN DEMOCRATICALLY

because they are muslims lol. Like I said,and I feel like I am repeating myself alot here. We do not want,and I repeat we don't want securalism in any kind may it be from puppets or atajew. We don't want a free pass to be infidels. Islam has to be in politics. How a country is ruled and the decisions being made has a big influence,a big impact on the population.
Now quit whining and suck it up.

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Wat alle clubs in nederland over amsterdam denken......
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Joined: May 7th, 2011, 10:51 pm

December 6th, 2011, 1:30 am #25

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Quote:Yeah, this idea that a Salafist "Islamist Republic of Egypt" and the Islamic Republic of Iran would be natural allies is really rather silly. No one kills Muslims like other Muslims.


Yep, absolutely nothing to do with the white swine, there was always a regular occurance of bombings in iraq, afghanistan and pakistan before the white anaimal go close to thei borders right? right?... wnaker
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Joined: July 17th, 2005, 7:30 pm

December 6th, 2011, 2:26 am #26

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
If we are the white swine does that make you the Yellow swine?

I liken the ME right now as going through growing pains, westen democracy and freedoms take time. And there is a fair amount of religious fanatics there that love to tell people how to live and what to believe...as law, sad indeed.

It is the political control that really ruins true religious belief as make them looks like a joke.

I cant respont to the muzzies above because nothing they say makes any sence. I think alittle education is in order, or is this the way allah likes you?


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Joined: April 2nd, 2005, 6:53 am

December 6th, 2011, 3:41 am #27

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Yeah that's right UCHIA, it was all whities' fault. You guys NEVER touched each other before 2003.

[/IMG]
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Joined: May 7th, 2011, 10:51 pm

December 6th, 2011, 6:26 am #28

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
@Oinkoink

thats not what I said, they did happen rarely... why is it that white scum can never admit to their crimes?, I mean its all just a coincidence right, wherever the whities go near there is civil strife, the country is turned completely upside down, it all makes sense the koran teaches muslims to hate muslims...

not quite, now back lets stick to facts...



September 05, 2011|By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times

Reporting from Peshawar, Pakistan A decade ago, Peshawar's bomb squad had it pretty easy.

Occasionally, one of its 20 members would be dispatched to a cornfield to defuse a mine planted by a villager who was feuding with his neighbor. Bombs were small and crude; the only tools an officer needed were pliers and a roll of electrical tape.

Because their budget was minuscule, the officers traveled by taxi.

Today, the squad careens through week after week of carnage and peril in this volatile city near the Afghan border. One day members are defusing a partially detonated explosive vest strapped to the torso of a dead militant, the next they are surveying evidence left behind by a teenage suicide bomber. The squad has grown to 113 members. Nine have died in the line of duty. At least five others have been maimed.

"Everything changed drastically after 9/11," said Khan Zada, a veteran of 17 years. "Now we're on the go all of the time."


http://articles.latimes.com/2011/sep/05 ... 1-20110906
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Joined: July 10th, 2011, 4:30 pm

December 6th, 2011, 11:27 am #29

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
No one is more racially/religiousely more intollerant than infidels lol. Are you kidding me? Let me go down the list. Religouse jews dont even serve the IDF all they do is complain and claim money dont even want to work ( The same could be said in Stamford Hill and Golders Green where I know a few jews) dont even let me get started about the Ashkenazi and Sephardic jews. Maybe alot of Israelis/Jews don't care but there is still a big cultural barrier from the Middle eastern jews and the European jews. And ofcourse you have the christians. If it wasn't for modernisation of Eastern Europe you would have Catholics,Protestants and Orthodox jumping at eachothers throats like wild dogs. And ofcourse you have the religiouse derpers of redneckstan. Who made a sport out of holding a pissing contest with Muslims who fairly stated they rather not have their holy books burned. OH YEAH,DERPPP WE BUERNNN YOU TALIBANNN,NINE ELEVEN DERPPP. Pretty much the misery in Middle East is brought on by puppet infidels and their infidel masters.

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Wat alle clubs in nederland over amsterdam denken......
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Joined: April 2nd, 2005, 6:53 am

December 7th, 2011, 1:46 am #30

By Telegraph reporter and agency in Cairo 10:48AM GMT 03 Dec 2011

Leaked results showed that religious parties, including hardliners, have won a clear majority of the parliamentary seats contested. Their success comes at the expense of the liberal activist groups that led the uprising against the former president Hosni Mubarak earlier this year.

The election commission said on Friday that 62 percent of eligible voters cast ballots for nearly a third of the seats in Egypt's parliament, in the highest turnout in modern history.

Only a trickle of results had been announced by Friday. Voting in the complex election will not be completed until the end of January.

But Egypt's Islamists appear increasingly confident that they are coming out on top, with some even outlining plans for a strict brand of religious law which could limit personal freedoms and put the nation on the road to becoming an Islamic state.

The Muslim Brotherhood, regarded as pragmatists, appeared poised to take the largest share of votes, as much as 45 percent. The surprise winner in the election appeared to be the much more hardline Nour Party. Leaks showed it could win as much as a quarter of the house, putting it in a powerful position to influence the agenda for debate.

The party espouses a strict interpretation of Islam in which democracy is subordinate to the Koran.

The party represents Egypt's Salafists and members speak openly about their aim of turning Egypt into a state where personal freedoms, including freedom of speech, women's dress and art, are constrained by Islamic law.

Thousands of protesters at the massive street demonstrations in January and February were calling for such freedoms.

The Nour Party only reluctantly included women as candidates, to comply with election regulations. It put women at the bottom of its lists, represented by flowers since women's photos were deemed inappropriate. It has only recently entered politics.

By contrast, the Muslim Brotherhood, Egypt's largest and best organized political group, was officially banned under Mubarak but established a nationwide network of activists who built a reputation for offering services to the poor. After Mubarak's fall, the group's Freedom and Justice Party campaigned successfully, their organisation and name-recognition giving them a big advantage over newly-formed liberal parties.

Stakes are particularly high since the new parliament is supposed to oversee writing a new constitution.

On Friday the election commisosion said that more than 8 million eligible voters - 62 percent - participated in the first round. But it announced final results in only a few races. It remains unclear when complete final results will be released.

This week's vote, held in nine provinces, will determine about 30 percent of the 498 seats in the People's Assembly, parliament's lower house. Two more rounds, ending in January, will cover Egypt's other 18 provinces.

The Telegaph
Douche and S/B, I thought I told you that I was conceding - it's ALWAYS WHITIES FAULT!

You guys never hurt one another, unless whitie makes you - kind of like how we martyred Imam Ali for you even.



[/IMG]
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