China giving India a bloody nose

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China giving India a bloody nose

Joined: March 17th, 2011, 8:26 pm

July 3rd, 2012, 8:46 pm #1





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

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Joined: May 13th, 2006, 11:14 am

July 4th, 2012, 8:19 am #2

What would you expect from a country whose 1.2B population not capable to produce a single bullet, all have to be imported. If you go deeper, you will see the export from India to China mostly are raw material like coal, iron ore, etc
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Joined: March 14th, 2006, 12:06 am

July 5th, 2012, 12:31 am #3





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

Did the chinese posters even read the article ? LOL

This is the real title of the article

India and China : Friend, enemy, rival, investor

The whole point of the article is that India should let chinese investments in because it needs investments and expertise in infrastructure development and the chinese need to investment in India since its better to spread its surplus funds other than in US govt bonds.

===========================================


Krinvanto Vishwam Aryam
(Make this World Noble)

- Rigveda


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By the time you realize that this signature doesn't say anything it's too late to stop reading it
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Joined: March 30th, 2012, 3:19 am

July 5th, 2012, 4:55 am #4





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

I vote for india elephent, the problem isn't we can't importing more but what can we buy from india and investing to?
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Joined: May 13th, 2006, 11:14 am

July 6th, 2012, 8:24 am #5





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

are you kidding me ? ..... investing in filthy poor tricky india. I'd rather donate the $$$ to African countries
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Joined: March 14th, 2006, 12:06 am

July 6th, 2012, 12:43 pm #6





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

Its not me saying it sissy boy, thats the article which you dumbos posted with wrong title.

The whole point of the article is that both India and China needs to diversify (India needs to diversify the investments from west while Chinese needs to divesify the markets from west) and hence it would be beneficial if both cooperate. But the chinese posters read one or two paras from the article, came up with their own conclusions and pulled the title out of nowhere! LOL

===========================================


Krinvanto Vishwam Aryam
(Make this World Noble)

- Rigveda


-------------------------------------------
By the time you realize that this signature doesn't say anything it's too late to stop reading it
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Joined: May 13th, 2006, 11:14 am

July 7th, 2012, 8:01 am #7





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

India is too poor and insignificant country, not worth mentioning. Anyway how indians would pay your debt ? unimaginable with cows dung and cows urine + rat meat. Those are only have an economic value in poor filthy dirty india, no where else
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Joined: March 14th, 2006, 12:06 am

July 7th, 2012, 2:01 pm #8





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

\\India is too poor and insignificant country, not worth mentioning.\\


Says the dumbo who keeps on mentioning India in every of his post ! LOL

===========================================


Krinvanto Vishwam Aryam
(Make this World Noble)

- Rigveda


-------------------------------------------
By the time you realize that this signature doesn't say anything it's too late to stop reading it
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Joined: January 9th, 2006, 4:49 am

July 10th, 2012, 6:30 pm #9





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

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Joined: March 14th, 2006, 12:06 am

July 10th, 2012, 11:09 pm #10





For every dollars worth of exports to China, India imports three, leading to a trade deficit of up to $40 billion in the year to March 2012, or about 2% of GDP (see chart). China accounts for a fifth of Indias overall trade deficit with the world, over half if oil is excluded. Given Indias balance-of-payments woesthe rupee has fallen by a fifth in the past yeareven Chinese businessmen worry that the discrepancy in bilateral trade is unhealthy.

And it may grow larger. For a start, the little manufacturing India has tends to be quite high-end. As Chinese firms shift to more complex forms of production, they will make life harder for Indian firms. Saif Qureishi of Kryfs, which makes the metal cores of transformers used in, for example, power grids, says China has won a third of the Indian transformer market and is giving locals a bloody nose.

Meanwhile, India does not produce much that China wants to buy, a hole that British colonial rulers once plugged with exports of Indian opium. Today Indias main exports to China are less iniquitous raw materials, mainly minerals and cotton.
http://www.economist.com/node/21557764? ... 010184c684

What does a pakistani has to do in a economic thread ? LOL




===========================================


Krinvanto Vishwam Aryam
(Make this World Noble)

- Rigveda


-------------------------------------------
By the time you realize that this signature doesn't say anything it's too late to stop reading it
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