Yet another reason to hit El Spruco

Yet another reason to hit El Spruco

Phil
Phil

July 23rd, 2001, 6:28 am #1

I wasn't a highpointer by design; rather, I was looking for stargazing spots. My very first high point came quite by accident when someone from an astronomy club in Akron, OH strongly recommended Spruce Knob.

All I can say is....it's dark up there. VERY, VERY dark. Couldn't believe my eyes; on summer nights you see the Milky Way span from horizon to horizon.

Well, apparently the word is out...

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepage ... /Ds_wv.htm

This spot is becoming very popular with East Coast astronomers fleeing light pollution. The next clear night on a weekend without any moonlight, you should check the place out; it's just awesome.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 23rd, 2001, 2:15 pm #2

By happy coincidence the Board of the Mountain Institute will be meeting on Spruce Knob on this our week of the convention.

The Mountain Institute is a nonprofit scientific and educational organization committed to the preservation of mountain environments and advancement of mountain cultures around the world. Since 1972, we have administered conservation, research, development, and education programs in the Andean, Appalachian and Himalayan Mountain Ranges.

Their page:
http://www.mountain.org/

Here's an article in the Charleston Sunday Gazette-Mail on July 22:

http://sundaygazettemail.com/news/Other+News/2001072125/

Excerpts:
Board members of The Mountain Institute, a global think tank offering programs to assist mountain people in Appalachia, the Himalayas and the Andes, are returning to their organization's Spruce Knob roots this week.

Following board meetings this weekend, several of the institute's top executives will tour sites and take part in discussions across West Virginia to learn more about issues related to mining, timbering, public land policies and ecotourism.

While previous Mountain Institute annual board meetings have been held in Nepal and Peru, the current meeting is being held on the Pendleton County mountainside where the organization was founded as the Woodlands Institute in 1972 by Daniel Taylor-Ide. Taylor-Ide, a Harvard-trained educator, went on to establish the West Virginia Scholars Academy, a summer program designed to help state high school students get into their colleges of choice.
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roger
roger

January 29th, 2002, 4:06 am #3

The Alps have been hurt by growing tourism and a migration of people from lower levels into more mountainous terrain. The Himalayas are being harmed by war, deforestation, drought, logging and overgrazing.


Other ranges under stress were:

the Rockies and Coast ranges of western North America, due to increasing pressure from recreational activities such as skiing and home-building in prime mountain land.

Great Smokey Mountains in the eastern United States, due to air pollution.

Amber Mountains in Madagascar, where 80 percent of forests have been lost to farming, mining and charcoal production.

Snowy Mountains of Australia, where 250 plant species were threatened by a series of warm winters.

Western Carpathians/Tatra Mountains in the Slovak Republic and Poland, impacted by air pollution and growth of tourism from surrounding urban areas.

Sierra Chincua in Mexico, winter home of the monarch butterfly. Forest is being lost to logging and farming.

Pamir mountains in Tajikistan. Civil war has resulted in widespread devastation and poverty.

Hengduan mountains in southwest China. A ban on logging and a push to develop tourism threaten mountain cultures.

http://cbsnews.cbs.com/now/story/0,1597 ... 2,00.shtml
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Ken Akerman
Ken Akerman

January 29th, 2002, 3:37 pm #4

Sierra Chincua in Mexico, winter home of the monarch butterfly. Forest is being lost to logging and farming.

Hengduan mountains in southwest China. A ban on logging and a push to develop tourism threaten mountain cultures.

Huh? One mountain range is being threatened by logging, yet another mountain range is being threatened because of a ban on logging. What are we supposed to do?

From both economic and environmental points of view, the common-sense approach is a moderate amount of logging, and replanting what is logged. This makes forest resources more valuable and ensures that there is a renewable supply of forest resources. Neither extreme - total clear-cutting without replanting, and total lockup and ban on forest cutting - is sustainable in the long run, nor is good for living standards among both mountain and lowland dwellers.
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Jack
Jack

January 30th, 2002, 12:23 am #5

I wasn't a highpointer by design; rather, I was looking for stargazing spots. My very first high point came quite by accident when someone from an astronomy club in Akron, OH strongly recommended Spruce Knob.

All I can say is....it's dark up there. VERY, VERY dark. Couldn't believe my eyes; on summer nights you see the Milky Way span from horizon to horizon.

Well, apparently the word is out...

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepage ... /Ds_wv.htm

This spot is becoming very popular with East Coast astronomers fleeing light pollution. The next clear night on a weekend without any moonlight, you should check the place out; it's just awesome.
The Spruce Goose might be good for star gazing, but near Black Mesa is darker. Kenton has exactly 1 street light and the power company will turn it off for astronomy conventions, which are regularly held there.
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maohai huang
maohai huang

February 1st, 2002, 10:12 am #6

Sierra Chincua in Mexico, winter home of the monarch butterfly. Forest is being lost to logging and farming.

Hengduan mountains in southwest China. A ban on logging and a push to develop tourism threaten mountain cultures.

Huh? One mountain range is being threatened by logging, yet another mountain range is being threatened because of a ban on logging. What are we supposed to do?

From both economic and environmental points of view, the common-sense approach is a moderate amount of logging, and replanting what is logged. This makes forest resources more valuable and ensures that there is a renewable supply of forest resources. Neither extreme - total clear-cutting without replanting, and total lockup and ban on forest cutting - is sustainable in the long run, nor is good for living standards among both mountain and lowland dwellers.
From what I know the Hengduan Range in China is
better off not having the level of logging it has
endured in the last 10 to 20 years. It's not that
the locals today need to log the forest as if it were
50 years ago. One could argue that a few people
lived off logging traditionally, so stopping them
from doing it can change their way of life. But
recent (in the last two decades) unchecked large
scale logging in SW China is mostly in pure
commercial nature that shows little respect
to the environment and sustainability of
local natural resource.
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