Welcome, Newest National Park Congaree Swamp in the Carolinas

Welcome, Newest National Park Congaree Swamp in the Carolinas

roger
roger

December 2nd, 2003, 12:43 am #1

The country's newest national park used to be called Congaree Swamp National Monument, and it doesn't take long to notice the knobby-kneed Cyprus, black water and musty air of the bottomlands.
But, park ranger Fran Rametta says the Congaree National Park <http://www.nps.gov/cosw/&gt; is much more than that.
Its 22,000 acres contain the only old-growth flood-plain forest left in the US. They're home to some of the largest trees along the East Coast. One of the trees in the park is a state-record loblolly pine that measures 16 feet around.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S ... v=0RaPJOj3
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John M.
John M.

December 2nd, 2003, 11:11 pm #2

Spooky Mike and Jon Mann came up with this area which is likely the HP at 140'.

http://www.topozone.com/map.asp?z=17&n= ... l&datum=na
d83&layer=DRG25

Greg Griffith is from the Carolinas so he'll be there soon.

- John M.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 30th, 2004, 3:36 pm #3

The country's newest national park used to be called Congaree Swamp National Monument, and it doesn't take long to notice the knobby-kneed Cyprus, black water and musty air of the bottomlands.
But, park ranger Fran Rametta says the Congaree National Park <http://www.nps.gov/cosw/&gt; is much more than that.
Its 22,000 acres contain the only old-growth flood-plain forest left in the US. They're home to some of the largest trees along the East Coast. One of the trees in the park is a state-record loblolly pine that measures 16 feet around.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S ... v=0RaPJOj3
The newest National Park—the only dedicated to the two-year U.S.-Mexican War—opened on Saturday in Brownsville, Tex.

Known as the Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site, the 3,400-acre park is the location of the first major battle of the Mexican War. Just 10 miles north of the Rio Grande, the undeveloped Palo Alto prairie looks like it did in 1846.

"All the reasons it was a battlefield—being a low-lying area and open plain—are the same reasons it was preserved, because you can't build on it," says Douglas Murphy, a National Park Service historian at the site. "The nature of the field has helped it preserve itself."

On the Palo Alto prairie on May 8, 1846, Gen. Zachary Taylor's 2,300 men defeated Mexico's Gen. Mariano Arista's 3,200 soldiers. Less than two years later, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo transferred 529,017 square miles of land—which included California, Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, and Utah—from Mexico to the United States.
http://www.nationaltrust.org/magazine/a ... 012804.htm
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 11th, 2004, 8:45 pm #4

The country's newest national park used to be called Congaree Swamp National Monument, and it doesn't take long to notice the knobby-kneed Cyprus, black water and musty air of the bottomlands.
But, park ranger Fran Rametta says the Congaree National Park <http://www.nps.gov/cosw/&gt; is much more than that.
Its 22,000 acres contain the only old-growth flood-plain forest left in the US. They're home to some of the largest trees along the East Coast. One of the trees in the park is a state-record loblolly pine that measures 16 feet around.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S ... v=0RaPJOj3
Colorado will become home to the country's newest national park when Interior Secretary Gale Norton officially reclassifies the Great Sand Dunes National Monument.
Norton will join Rep. Scott McInnis and Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell in a ceremony Monday at the dunes to designate the southern Colorado site a national park. McInnis, Campbell and fellow Republican Sen. Wayne Allard sponsored legislation and lobbied to have the 750-foot dunes, North America's tallest, the surrounding mountains and the sagebrush-dotted high desert turned into a national park.
The dunes hug the bottom of the snowy Sangre de Cristo Mountains that tower over the San Luis Valley. The landscape changes from 8,200-foot-high grasslands, to the dunes, to 13,000-plus-foot mountains and alpine lakes - all within four miles.
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercuryn ... 638543.htm
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 2:58 pm

September 13th, 2004, 1:49 pm #5

We're very excited about the Dunes becoming a National Park today. On October 2, the expanded Visitor Center (closed for the past 2 years) will re-open. It has about twice the area for its bookstore (yeah!!!), a multi-media room, and many excellent interpretive displays; plus it moves much of the staff into a single building, which is going to make their lives a lot easier. We've been asked to participate in a book signing that day, but aren't sure yet if we'll be able to attend (we have friends arriving just 2 days before from Australia).

For news about Great Sand Dunes, please watch our site at
http://www.GreatSandDunes.info

We try to keep it updated regularly with news about the Dunes.

----------------
D Winger
http://www.HighpointAdventures.com
http://www.GreatSandDunes.info
http://www.JoshuaTreeTrad.com
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

September 13th, 2004, 5:14 pm #6

The country's newest national park used to be called Congaree Swamp National Monument, and it doesn't take long to notice the knobby-kneed Cyprus, black water and musty air of the bottomlands.
But, park ranger Fran Rametta says the Congaree National Park <http://www.nps.gov/cosw/&gt; is much more than that.
Its 22,000 acres contain the only old-growth flood-plain forest left in the US. They're home to some of the largest trees along the East Coast. One of the trees in the park is a state-record loblolly pine that measures 16 feet around.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S ... v=0RaPJOj3
trip reports for national park highpoints:

http://www.cohp.org/natl_parks/national_parks.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

September 18th, 2004, 4:54 pm #7

The country's newest national park used to be called Congaree Swamp National Monument, and it doesn't take long to notice the knobby-kneed Cyprus, black water and musty air of the bottomlands.
But, park ranger Fran Rametta says the Congaree National Park <http://www.nps.gov/cosw/&gt; is much more than that.
Its 22,000 acres contain the only old-growth flood-plain forest left in the US. They're home to some of the largest trees along the East Coast. One of the trees in the park is a state-record loblolly pine that measures 16 feet around.
http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?S ... v=0RaPJOj3
For more than a century Crater Lake National Park has laid claim to being Oregon's only national park.

It appears that claim will soon come to an end. Capping a series of celebrations of explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, the Senate Wednesday approved a bill establishing the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park in Oregon and Washington state.


The Senate also approved a bill to expand the boundaries of Mount Rainier National Park in Washington state by roughly 800 acres, the largest expansion in more than 70 years.

The Lewis and Clark bill now goes to the House, which approved a similar measure in July. The Rainier bill goes to President Bush for his signature. The Senate votes on both bills were unanimous.

The Lewis and Clark bill would expand and rename Fort Clatsop National Memorial in Oregon and add three sites along the lower Columbia River, bringing the federal park for the first time into Washington state.

The Bush administration proposed the Lewis and Clark park in February, calling it a fitting way to mark the bicentennial of the famous expedition to the Pacific Ocean.



While the Lewis and Clark-led Corps of Discovery spent the winter of 1805-06 in Fort Clatsop, the expedition traveled widely over the region.





http://www.heraldandnews.com/articles/2 ... s/top4.txt
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Joined: January 21st, 2004, 3:15 pm

September 20th, 2004, 2:18 pm #8

It is national park property but calling it Lewis & Clark National Park is inaccurate.

For definitions of NPS designations, refer to http://www.nps.gov/legacy/nomenclature.html

National Park
National Monument
National Preserve
National Historic Site
National Historical Park
National Memorial
National Battlefield
National Cemetery:
National Recreation Area
National Seashore
National Lakeshore
National River
National Parkway
National Trail
Affliated Areas
Unique Titles (eg, White House)
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