Town Near Jerimoth Voted RI's Best; Its Highway Most Dangerous

Town Near Jerimoth Voted RI's Best; Its Highway Most Dangerous

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October 24th, 2000, 6:34 am #1

http://projo.com/cgi-bin/story.pl/news/04417221.htm

This item from the Providence Journal was forwarded about Foster (the closest RI town to Jerimoth) being named the best place to live in RI.

But the point of the article is that the Highway 6 is dubbed "Suicide 6" as one of the most dangerous highways in the U.S.

The person forwarded this mentions a covered bridge near Jerimoth. It is profiled at:

http://www.atawalk.com/

You will have to look up the individual Rhode Island listing as the website is in frames.
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October 24th, 2000, 6:45 am #2

After being tipped off about the Foster item, I did a search on Jerimoth at the Providence Journal. Here's an amusing item.
85-ton boulder mystifies the experts - Is
it 1,000 years old? - How did it end up in
Foster? - How could it have been
moved? - Was

BYLINE: DICK MARTIN Special to the Journal
DATE: 10-15-1999
PUBLICATION: Providence Journal Company
EDITION:
SECTION: Newspapers_&_Newswires
PAGE: C-04

FOSTER -Michael Lyons has more than a piece of the rock. He has the whole
rock — 85 tons of it, aligned east-west in front of his house on Route 101.

The problem is that no one is quite sure how it got there or what it means. One
thing they are sure of: It is a mystery waiting to be solved.

“It is a pretty outstanding stone,” said Stan Gaby, a professor of geology at the
University of Connecticut. “Someone planted it upon that spot and aligned it
almost perfectly in line east to west. I particularly haven't seen anything
propped up like that, particularly that large.”

Neither had Lyons, who moved into the house in 1984. At the time, he
recalled, brush and trees had grown up around the house, built by Lester
Hammond in 1944 and occupied by the Hammond family until sometime in the
early 1980s.

Lyons said that when he bought it the house had been vacant for several years.
The huge, wedge-shaped stone in his front yard hidden by foliage was a
surprise.

“At some point, we were just walking around the property and discovered it,”
Lyons said. “It makes a helluva lawn ornament.”

In the last year or so, Lyons uncovered the stone completely so that passersby
could appreciate its unusual size and placement.

Lyons noted that travelers stop from time to time to admire it, gawk at it as
they drive by, take photos or even pose for photos in front of it. That led to its
“discovery” by the New England Antiquities Research Association recently,
which has opened the door to a whole new world of possibilities for the stone.

Douglas Schwartz, state coordinator of the association, was intrigued, and
contacted other members of the association, along with Gaby, all of whom are
impressed, if not dumbfounded.

“There are a lot of stone constructions tied into features of the landscape,” said
Schwartz, also a Groton resident. “We have a lot of accounts of native stone
construction. This is an impressive one.”

The stone's origins are anyone's guess.

Schwartz theorized that it could have been placed by Algonquins 1,000 years
ago or earlier, or even by some other Native American tribe.

Jerimoth Hill, the highest point in Rhode Island, is just down the road. The
stone could be a marker of some sort, a special point for early natives to meet,
or it might have some connection to the heavens as part of Native American
knowledge, signaling a solstice or other seasonal benchmark.

“The Native Americans worshiped the features of the earth,” Schwartz said.
“There are all kinds of things that are still being found. They sought out features
in the landscape. It was a religious thing.”

Schwartz noted that early natives were responsible for a number of stone
constructions throughout the Northeast, but that they were seldom mentioned
in early town records, making it hard to trace their origins.

Though Gaby confirmed that the stone was placed by human hands and was
not the result of a glacial movement, he hesitated to suggest its origin, noting
that it is almost impossible to come to any conclusions — at least not yet.

“No one knows today about anyone erecting it,” he said. “It predates our
conversational knowledge. The point is: It goes back before anyone recollects
it.”

Norman Hammond, the oldest son of the original Hammond family who lived
there, recalled that the stone's origins were a question when he was a child, but
that no one could come up with the answer then, either.

“It's always been there as far as I can remember,” said Hammond.

Gaby noted that he explores rock formations all the time, including the
“standing stones” of England, such as Stonehenge. In 1979, he published a
book entitled Day Trips Though Connecticut, a road map to various locations
where natural and native rock formations might be found.

“Those things are always kind of mysterious,” he said. “There are many stone
artifacts here in New England. The biggest question in your mind isn't so much
who did it, but how come it's still standing.”

Lyons admitted being wary of the stone at first, since it seemed to be
precariously balanced atop another rock. But after surveying it carefully and
having others do the same, he concluded that it would take a major force to
even budge the stone in any direction, partly because of a strategically placed
stone wedge that helps keep the object in place.

The massive stone is about 8 feet wide at its widest point at the base, about 14
feet high and about 20 feet long. The top of the wedge, a long edge, points
from east to west in what Schwartz defined as a “perfect line.” The fact that it
sits close to the top of a large hill adds another dimension to its possible origins
and use.

As far as Lyons is concerned, it is enough to own a piece of the rock, at least
for a little while. In fact, the way he sees it, the stone is not his, but the earth's,
part of the landscape.

“I don't feel like I own it,” said Lyons. “It will be here long after I'm gone and
this house is gone. It's part of the land, placed there by someone, sometime...
who knows when? I just think it's amazing.”
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October 24th, 2000, 6:49 am #3

http://projo.com/cgi-bin/story.pl/news/04417221.htm

This item from the Providence Journal was forwarded about Foster (the closest RI town to Jerimoth) being named the best place to live in RI.

But the point of the article is that the Highway 6 is dubbed "Suicide 6" as one of the most dangerous highways in the U.S.

The person forwarded this mentions a covered bridge near Jerimoth. It is profiled at:

http://www.atawalk.com/

You will have to look up the individual Rhode Island listing as the website is in frames.
Ain't no landfill high enough - Agency
says stop dumping on trash pile's size

BYLINE:
DATE: 09-14-2000
PUBLICATION: Providence Journal Company
EDITION: All
SECTION: NEWS
PAGE: B-01

Quick quiz: What's the tallest structure - natural or manmade in Rhode Island?

If you answered the Central Landfill in Johnston, you are WRONG! And the
state Resource Recovery Corporation wants you to know that. In fact, the
folks at the corporation are so tired of people (the media) pointing to that pile
of trash as Little Rhody's equivalent of New York City's World Trade Center
that they put out a news release listing taller piles of things in our state.

And, by the way, don't call it a dump; the Resource Recovery Corporation
prefers calling it a "landfill."

While it is true that you can see our tallish trash pile (landfill) from a boat in
upper Narragansett Bay, part of the reason is that they started dumping on land
that is 310 feet above sea level. The pile of compacted trash and cover
material itself is 230 feet tall, placing the highest point 540 feet above sea level,
which in Rhode Island passes for a medium-size "mountain."

But, as the Resource Recovery Corporation notes, there are at least six
structures in the state that are taller than the landfill's 230 feet. They range from
the Providence Biltmore hotel at 270 feet, to the Fleet Boston Financial
Building at 420 feet, both in Providence.

And the highest point above sea level in the state is the same today as it was
more than 350 years ago when Roger Williams set up shop here: Jerimoth Hill
in Foster, at 812 feet.
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October 24th, 2000, 6:52 am #4

http://projo.com/cgi-bin/story.pl/news/04417221.htm

This item from the Providence Journal was forwarded about Foster (the closest RI town to Jerimoth) being named the best place to live in RI.

But the point of the article is that the Highway 6 is dubbed "Suicide 6" as one of the most dangerous highways in the U.S.

The person forwarded this mentions a covered bridge near Jerimoth. It is profiled at:

http://www.atawalk.com/

You will have to look up the individual Rhode Island listing as the website is in frames.
Hearing set on phone towers

BYLINE: DOUGLAS STEINKE
DATE: 09-28-2000
PUBLICATION: Providence Journal Company
EDITION: Northwest
SECTION: NEWS
PAGE: C-01

* There's only one such tower in town now, but several companies have
applied to build others.

*

FOSTER - When the Planning Board recently received several applications
from companies that want to erect telecommunications towers in this town of
some 4,400 people, Town Planner Ann Grenier decided it was time to hold an
informational meeting about the requests.

The session will be held Oct. 4 at 7 p.m. in the Benjamin Eddy Building.
Grenier expects that representatives from telecommunication companies as well
as concerned citizens will attend.

For a town of our size it's an important issue, Grenier said. We're just trying to
get some input.

The construction of towers has become a somewhat dicey issue. Landowners
who agree to have the towers on their farms stand to collect about $1,500 a
month from the telecommunications companies that build them, town officials
say. They are generally in favor of the towers because of the extra income, but
others sometimes object to having a tower in their neighborhood.

Town planning and zoning boards have some control over the appearance and
location of new towers. They must, however, follow federal guidelines. Under
Section 704 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, local zoning boards
cannot prohibit or have the effect of prohibiting the provision of personal
wireless services, and any decisions to deny tower applications must be put in
writing.

Some communities have required companies to disguise telecommunications
towers. This month in Smithfield, for example, the town's zoning board
approved a tower that would be disguised as a flagpole.

There is currently just one cell phone tower in Foster. It was built in 1994 and
sits on Route 6 near the Balcom Road intersection. The tower and the
property, Grenier said, are owned by SNET Cellular. SNET is a subsidiary of
SBC Communications, which is the second- largest local telephone outfit in the
United States and a major wireless telephone service provider. Based in San
Antonio, the company had $49 billion in revenues in 1999.

Industrial Communications, in Marshfield, Mass., was one of the companies
that applied to build a tower in Foster, on Hartford Pike near the Jerimoth Hill
Road intersection. The company is a two-way communication service provider
primarily for construction workers, utility workers and emergency service
crews in New England, said site acquisitions specialist Tara Calabrese.

Everyone uses their cell phone, although I think the industry has some social
responsibility in picking sites, she said, noting that her company's proposal aims
to build a tower where there is already an old radio tower. To me, that's
minimizing the effect.
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October 24th, 2000, 6:57 am #5

http://projo.com/cgi-bin/story.pl/news/04417221.htm

This item from the Providence Journal was forwarded about Foster (the closest RI town to Jerimoth) being named the best place to live in RI.

But the point of the article is that the Highway 6 is dubbed "Suicide 6" as one of the most dangerous highways in the U.S.

The person forwarded this mentions a covered bridge near Jerimoth. It is profiled at:

http://www.atawalk.com/

You will have to look up the individual Rhode Island listing as the website is in frames.
In this story, there's an amusing tale that snow appears to be the worst in the heights around Jerimoth!

OUR ECLECTIC CLIMATE Where the
weather gets weird

BYLINE: C. EUGENE EMERY JR. Journal-Bulletin Science Writer
DATE: 11-15-1994
PUBLICATION: Providence Journal Company
EDITION:
SECTION: Newspapers_&_Newswires
PAGE: C-01

Mike Carbone remembers working at Quonset Point on a night when he and
his fellow meteorologists saw nothing but rain all evening. But that changed as
soon as he got in his car and drove inland, headed for home.

"By the time I got to the front gate, I found a mixture of rain and snow," he
recalls, "and by the time I got to the highway, it was all snow."

It wasn't the weather that was changing - it was the climate.

Mark Twain used to say, "If you don't like the weather in New England, just
wait a few minutes."

But in Rhode Island and Southeastern Massachusetts, if you don't like the
weather, the solution may be to drive a mile or so.

The closeness to the ocean, the huge bay extending deep into Rhode Island,
the varying elevations, and even patterns of development are factors that can
interact to create differing weather conditions from town to town.

Consider the snowfall totals last winter.

Kingston, Westerly, Jamestown, Newport and most of Little Compton
generally got less than 60 inches, while the northwest part of the state received
well over 80 inches, according to data compiled by members of RIBCON, the
Rhode Island-Bristol County Observer Network.

Snowfall isn't the only category in which conditions can vary from place to
place.

On Aug. 2, for example, the high temperature that observer James Stoughton
logged in Bristol was 84 degrees. Yet 9 miles away, in Fall River, Mass., Alan
Pontes' thermometer produced a reading 10 degrees higher.

And during the months when thunderstorms rumble across the region, it's not
unusual to feel as if the world is about to end in a blaze of lightning, only to
discover that someone a few towns away heard nary a rumble.

"You can have 30 or 40 different kinds of weather in one afternoon in Rhode
Island, from the shoreline to the Burrillville area. It's especially true in the
winter," said RIBCON founder Ray Vincent of Providence.

Microclimate - the potential for widely varying weather conditions within a
small geographical area - is one reason forecasters often give a range of
temperatures in their predictions, why meteorologists often refer to the
"normally cooler suburbs," and why the prognosticators sometimes tear their
hair out trying to predict the boundary between rain and snow during a winter
storm.

Some of the factors that influence weather conditions from town to town:



The ocean

"The primary thing with Rhode Island is the orientation on the water, with the
Atlantic to the south and Narragansett Bay running almost up the center of it,"
said Carbone, a longtime specialist at the National Weather Service office in
Warwick who is now based in the service's regional office in Taunton, Mass.

Ocean water is crucial because of the way it slowly but relentlessly absorbs
and emits heat. Air, in contrast, warms and cools much faster. Thus, the ocean
is still frigid on the first official day of summer and, once warmed, remains
warm even into mid-October, when the first frosts hit.

Ocean water affects the weather because of its ability to heat or cool the air
above it. Thus, at the beginning of the summer when the air is warm but the
ocean hasn't had time to collect much heat, a wind coming off the water can be
bone-chilling compared to the temperature a little further inland.

But by the time fall and winter roll around, the ocean still has plenty of warmth
- enough to drive the air temperature high enough so coastal areas often get
significantly less snow than the inland areas.

The interaction between water and land can also produce different wind
patterns.

During the day, when the sun heats the land, the land warms the air above it,
causing it to rise. Cooler air from the ocean rushes in to replace it, creating a
sea breeze.

At night, because the land cools faster than the water, the pattern is reversed
and the breeze may come from the land.



Elevation

There's a reason snowfall often brings no school in Foster-Glocester.

Besides being away from the ocean's warming breezes, elevated regions tend
to have cooler temperatures.

"Elevation makes a big difference in a coastal storm," said Vincent, "especially
if the temperature is close to freezing."

Elevation alone would make a 4-degree difference in the temperature between
sea level and Jerimoth Hill in Foster, the highest point in Rhode Island,
Vincent said.

"There can even be a big difference between the bottom of a big hill and the
top of the hill," said Carbone, who used to notice a change in snowfall patterns
as he traveled from Warwick through the northwestern quadrant of the state
along Route 295, a highway that often seems to mark the boundary between
light and heavy snowfall.

Terrain can affect temperature in another way.

"When I was a kid and people used to report the temperature at Wood River
Junction (in Richmond), they always had the coldest temperatures," said
Carbone.

Only later did he discover why: On cool, clear and windless nights, cold, heavy
air from the north drains down the valley and into Wood River Junction.
Upstream temperatures are higher because warm air flows into the region to
replace the cold air that has drifted downstream.



Development

Cities, with their concrete and brick, retain the sun's heat much more easily
than areas where there is plenty of vegetation.

The result is known as the "heat island" effect, which can make an urban area
10 degrees warmer than the countryside during the winter and at night.

Cities can also create their own unique wind patterns.

Walk through parts of downtown Providence on a moderately breezy day, for
example, and you risk being blown off your feet by the gusts.

The reason: The wind flowing across the landscape needs somewhere to go
when it runs into the tall buildings. One path to take is through the spaces
between the buildings and down the streets.

The buildings, in effect, become huge air funnels. When the National Weather
Service is reporting sustained winds of only 20 mph, pedestrians may feel
caught in a wind tunnel.



Cloud patterns

With the weather, as in life, being in the wrong place at the wrong time can
make all the difference in the world.

Location often determines who gets drenched by thunderstorms, which often
take the form of small cells that dump rain on one spot while leaving a nearby
area dry.

"I remember one time at the airport where a thunderstorm passed just to our
south," said Carbone. "We only got a trace of rain. But the police station,
which is about 2 1/2 miles south, had a 2-inch rain gauge that overflowed."
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October 25th, 2000, 7:42 pm #6

After being tipped off about the Foster item, I did a search on Jerimoth at the Providence Journal. Here's an amusing item.
85-ton boulder mystifies the experts - Is
it 1,000 years old? - How did it end up in
Foster? - How could it have been
moved? - Was

BYLINE: DICK MARTIN Special to the Journal
DATE: 10-15-1999
PUBLICATION: Providence Journal Company
EDITION:
SECTION: Newspapers_&_Newswires
PAGE: C-04

FOSTER -Michael Lyons has more than a piece of the rock. He has the whole
rock — 85 tons of it, aligned east-west in front of his house on Route 101.

The problem is that no one is quite sure how it got there or what it means. One
thing they are sure of: It is a mystery waiting to be solved.

“It is a pretty outstanding stone,” said Stan Gaby, a professor of geology at the
University of Connecticut. “Someone planted it upon that spot and aligned it
almost perfectly in line east to west. I particularly haven't seen anything
propped up like that, particularly that large.”

Neither had Lyons, who moved into the house in 1984. At the time, he
recalled, brush and trees had grown up around the house, built by Lester
Hammond in 1944 and occupied by the Hammond family until sometime in the
early 1980s.

Lyons said that when he bought it the house had been vacant for several years.
The huge, wedge-shaped stone in his front yard hidden by foliage was a
surprise.

“At some point, we were just walking around the property and discovered it,”
Lyons said. “It makes a helluva lawn ornament.”

In the last year or so, Lyons uncovered the stone completely so that passersby
could appreciate its unusual size and placement.

Lyons noted that travelers stop from time to time to admire it, gawk at it as
they drive by, take photos or even pose for photos in front of it. That led to its
“discovery” by the New England Antiquities Research Association recently,
which has opened the door to a whole new world of possibilities for the stone.

Douglas Schwartz, state coordinator of the association, was intrigued, and
contacted other members of the association, along with Gaby, all of whom are
impressed, if not dumbfounded.

“There are a lot of stone constructions tied into features of the landscape,” said
Schwartz, also a Groton resident. “We have a lot of accounts of native stone
construction. This is an impressive one.”

The stone's origins are anyone's guess.

Schwartz theorized that it could have been placed by Algonquins 1,000 years
ago or earlier, or even by some other Native American tribe.

Jerimoth Hill, the highest point in Rhode Island, is just down the road. The
stone could be a marker of some sort, a special point for early natives to meet,
or it might have some connection to the heavens as part of Native American
knowledge, signaling a solstice or other seasonal benchmark.

“The Native Americans worshiped the features of the earth,” Schwartz said.
“There are all kinds of things that are still being found. They sought out features
in the landscape. It was a religious thing.”

Schwartz noted that early natives were responsible for a number of stone
constructions throughout the Northeast, but that they were seldom mentioned
in early town records, making it hard to trace their origins.

Though Gaby confirmed that the stone was placed by human hands and was
not the result of a glacial movement, he hesitated to suggest its origin, noting
that it is almost impossible to come to any conclusions — at least not yet.

“No one knows today about anyone erecting it,” he said. “It predates our
conversational knowledge. The point is: It goes back before anyone recollects
it.”

Norman Hammond, the oldest son of the original Hammond family who lived
there, recalled that the stone's origins were a question when he was a child, but
that no one could come up with the answer then, either.

“It's always been there as far as I can remember,” said Hammond.

Gaby noted that he explores rock formations all the time, including the
“standing stones” of England, such as Stonehenge. In 1979, he published a
book entitled Day Trips Though Connecticut, a road map to various locations
where natural and native rock formations might be found.

“Those things are always kind of mysterious,” he said. “There are many stone
artifacts here in New England. The biggest question in your mind isn't so much
who did it, but how come it's still standing.”

Lyons admitted being wary of the stone at first, since it seemed to be
precariously balanced atop another rock. But after surveying it carefully and
having others do the same, he concluded that it would take a major force to
even budge the stone in any direction, partly because of a strategically placed
stone wedge that helps keep the object in place.

The massive stone is about 8 feet wide at its widest point at the base, about 14
feet high and about 20 feet long. The top of the wedge, a long edge, points
from east to west in what Schwartz defined as a “perfect line.” The fact that it
sits close to the top of a large hill adds another dimension to its possible origins
and use.

As far as Lyons is concerned, it is enough to own a piece of the rock, at least
for a little while. In fact, the way he sees it, the stone is not his, but the earth's,
part of the landscape.

“I don't feel like I own it,” said Lyons. “It will be here long after I'm gone and
this house is gone. It's part of the land, placed there by someone, sometime...
who knows when? I just think it's amazing.”
How did I miss this thing? is it east or west of the summit/pass??

I just returned from Stonehenge, etc. Very interesting place. An east-west alignment would imply equinox, not solstice, as per the news story. Any reports of Druids??
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