Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 5th, 2004, 8:24 pm #2

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 5th, 2004, 8:25 pm #3

A German mountaineer in his 60s was feared dead after a fall while descending Pakistan's second highest peak, Nanga Parbat, expedition officials said on Monday.
The man was part of a six-member German expedition that set off in May to climb the 26,658-foot (8,125-m) peak, whose name in Urdu means "Naked Mountain."
The accident happened last week ahead of the 51th anniversary of the peak's conquest by a German climber.
"He slipped when he was descending along with his colleagues," said Esar Karim, the tour operator who organized the trip, adding that the team had successfully reached the summit.
The remaining members of the expedition returned safely, added Karim, who identified the missing man as Gunter Jung.
A German embassy spokesman confirmed a national was feared dead, but declined to give his name.
"We are still waiting for information from the Pakistani authorities," he said.
Nanga Parbat, also known as "Killer Mountain" for the risks associated with ascents, is the ninth highest mountain in the world and the westernmost mountain of the Himalayas.
Hermann Buhl, a German, was the first climber to reach the peak of Nanga Parbat on July 3, 1953, climbing Web sites say.
Pakistan's remote north boasts five of world's 14 peaks higher than 8,000 meters.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtm ... ID=5588694


At 65, Günter Jung was the oldest person to climb Nanga Parbat when he fell and went missing on descent.

Expedition leader Christian Walter led AlpinClub's first 8,000m expedition to Nanga Parbat in 1993. The team attempted the classical Rakhiot (Buhl) Route, but did not make the summit. Now, 11 years later, Christian made good on his vow to return. Joining him this year is his brother Markus (who has climbed four 8000ers), Jörg Stingl, the second German to climb Everest without oxygen, and Jens Triebel and Carsten Beichler, who each have made first ascents on rock climbs in Brooks Range and Grade X sport climbs. Rounding out the team was 65 year-old Günter Jung, who had 40 years of climbing experience and summited several 7,000m peaks.

Nanga Parbat lies in the Western Himalaya and is the 6th tallest mountain and the 2nd most dangerous after Annapurna. Statistically the summit/fatality rate is 28%.

http://www.k2climb.net/story/SummitandT ... 2004.shtml
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 6th, 2004, 8:16 pm #4

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.
MOOSE, Wyo. -- Grand Teton National Park rangers rescued two injured backpackers who slipped and fell through an opening in a snowfield during a holiday trek.
They were part of a family hiking down Teton Crest Trail west of 13,770-foot Grand Teton on Sunday.
Will Behrens, 78, of Windsor, Calif., suffered a head injury, and David Behrens, 50, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, injured a knee when they fell through the gap while descending a portion of Cascade Canyon below Hurricane Pass, officials said.
David Behrens' son, 16, was the first to fall, suffering facial injuries and losing several teeth. He fell into running water underneath the snow.
While attempting to help his son, David Behrens fell through the same opening. Will Behrens tried to move to a safer area, but he, too, slipped on the icy slope, dropping into the same hole.
The three managed to get out, set up their tent and put on dry clothes. The boy then hiked out and reached help on a cell phone.
Dodging thunderstorms, rescuers flew in six rangers by helicopter to provide initial care. The hikers were transported to a Jackson hospital.

http://166.70.44.66/2004/Jul/07062004/utah/181350.asp
Last edited by dipper on July 6th, 2004, 8:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 10th, 2004, 8:25 pm #5

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.
The bodies of the four French climbers who died on the Valdostan side of the Monte Rosa Massif have been recovered. The four bodies have been airlifted by the Valdostan national rescue service to the city morgue of Champoluc. At around six this morning, the helicopter was able to take off because the weather had cleared making it possible to recover the four victims' bodies. The climbers were found near Castore Mountain (4,225 m) between D'Ayas Valley and Gressoney Valley. It seems from the first inquiries, that they fell from the top of the Castore Mountain, slipping down its side. The tragedy took place yesterday. The four, together with two other French climbers were all well-equipped experts; the two survivors, a man and a woman, were brought to Aosta's regional hospital, are in "very serious conditions",
http://www.agi.it/english/news.pl?doc=2 ... .oggitalia
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 15th, 2004, 8:13 pm #6

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.
A Florida woman is expected to be released from the hospital Thursday, after recovering from an illness that struck while she was hiking on the Appalachian Trail in northern Maine.
Sara Rahaim of Jacksonville became so ill Tuesday she couldn't walk without help. Seven other hikers, who included Outward Bound students and their instructor, carried Rahaim over five miles on their shoulders to a vehicle owned by the outdoors group.
The 63-year-old woman was taken to Charles Dean Memorial Hospital in Greenville and later transferred to Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor.
Rahaim had been hiking on the trail in a remote area west of Millinocket with a friend when she got sick.
Medical officials say Rahaim suffered from bleeding in her stomach caused by medicines she was taking for neck pains.
http://www.wmtw.com/Global/story.asp?S=2043172
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 15th, 2004, 8:20 pm #7

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Yosemite National Park (CA)
Rescue of Pack Mules

A park concession mule train supplying the Merced Lake High Sierra Camp wrecked on the Bunnell switchbacks in the Merced River Canyon around noon on July 9th. Four loaded mules, strung together by rope, tumbled and slid for approximately 200 feet across low-angle granite slabs below the trail and came to rest upon a granite bench. The animals sustained only slight injuries in their fall. An NPS trail crew working nearby responded and assisted in stabilizing the mules and assessing the situation. The trail crew members decided that more resources and equipment were needed to safely extricate the animals from where they were now stuck. The concession stables foreman, the park trails branch supervisor, and two SAR team members were flown to the scene in the park’s contract helicopter. The mules’ metal shoes were covered with tape to simulate “sticky rubber” climbing shoes. A rope system was set up to “belay” the mules as they made their way back across the slick rock and up to the trail. Three of four mules danced, high-stepped, and stumbled as they were lead across the slabs back to safety. One mule, weighing about a thousand pounds, slipped and rolled, but was caught by the rope team. She was able to right herself and safely continue. When all four mules were back on the trail, they were repacked and continued up the trail to the camp.[Submitted by Jason Gayeski-Peters, SAR Team] http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/ ... F13%2F2004
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 15th, 2004, 9:18 pm #8

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.
WILLIAMSTOWN -- An injured Brookline man spent about six hours in a remote, rugged area near the Mount Prospect Trail on Saturday as town and state emergency workers worked urgently to bring him to safety.
The rescue of 49-year-old Frederick Lawrence forced rescuers to hike about three miles in and out of extremely rugged mountain landscapes to reach Lawrence and carry him to a waiting ambulance. Two emergency responders were injured during their rescue efforts.
Town police Sgt. Scott McGowan said that Lawrence used a cellular telephone to alert police that he had slipped while walking and seriously injured his ankle. Lawrence reported the accident at 4 p.m., and police immediately assembled a rescue team. Town officers, Massachusetts Environmental Police, and emergency medical technicians with the Village Ambulance Service were assisted by a Massachusetts State Police helicopter during the initial rescue attempt.
According to McGowan, first reports indicated that that Lawrence was in an area accessible by all-terrain vehicles, and ATVs loaded with rescue gear were sent up the trail. But about 20 minutes into the trek, McGowan said he was notified by radio that the area was very treacherous and just a few minutes after that, one ATV plunged over a 10-foot embankment. The crash left EMT John Meaney of Village Ambulance with a shoulder injury and town police Officer Michael Ziemba with bruises and lacerations. Meaney was taken from the scene and brought to North Adams Regional Hospital; Ziemba continued to work with rescuers and was examined at the hospital after the rescue was completed, McGowan said.
Officials at the scene realized that the rescue would have to be accomplished on foot, and a 21-member rescue team was sent up the mountain. Team members included town and state police officers, EMTs, members of the Berkshire County Search and Rescue agency, state park rangers, state environmental police officers, and members of the Pownal, Vt., fire department.
"This was real dangerous at times," McGowan said, and noted that the rescuers hauled an emergency rescue basket, rope, medical stabilizing equipment, communication radios and portable lights as they made their way to Lawrence.
http://www.thetranscript.com/Stories/0, ... 19,00.html
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 15th, 2004, 9:19 pm #9

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.
Sixty-three college student hikers trapped on mountains as Tropical Storm Mindulle swept the nation were rescued by helicopter yesterday. All were recovered and no one was seriously hurt.
The Sea Gull Helicopter Rescue Team in Chiayi County yesterday morning flew into mountain areas in Nantou County to transport the marooned students to a medical station set up at a local stadium.
Most of the students had been trapped in the mountains for at least six days.
Seven students were from Chengchi University, six from National Taiwan Ocean University, eight from Tamkang University and 16 from National Chungshing University.
After alighting from the helicopter at the stadium, several students, some crying, called their parents to tell them they were fine. Others hugged friends and family who had been waiting for them.
The rescued students were tired, some badly bitten by mosquitoes. One student had suffered minor abrasions.
Students from National Taiwan Ocean University told reporters that because of the heavy rain, landslides and falling rocks, they had chosen to shelter in huts and wait for rescue.
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ ... 2003178112
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 15th, 2004, 9:20 pm #10

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.
CLIMBER died in Glencoe while trying to climb to the top of Buachaille Etive Mhor to leave a surprise bottle of champagne for a friend.
Trevor Walls, 51, editor of The Glaswegian weekly newspaper, slipped and fell while climbing on Friday.
His body was found in East Gully by members of Glencoe mountain rescue team, who found the bottle smashed inside Mr Walls's rucksack.
Last night his mother Jean, 71, said Mr Walls had wanted to leave a bottle of champagne at the summit in celebration of the 50th birthday of a friend, who had been due to climb the mountain later that day.
He had played a leading role in the Daily Record mountain club and members continued with their weekend plans to climb the mountain where he died in his honour.
A club spokesman said: "It was a very emotional day, but we felt it was the right thing to do, and it is what Trevor would have wanted."
Mrs Walls said her son, former supplements editor at the Daily Record, had died doing the thing he loved. "Just two weeks ago, we talked about the risks of his climbing. He said to me 'If I go off a hill, then I'll go happy'. He loved the hills, and we are getting comfort from the fact he died doing something that meant so much to him."
Mr Walls had climbed on Buachaille Etive Mhor several times. Friends and family plan to scatter his ashes on the mountain.
His father John, 75, of Monymusk, Aberdeenshire, said last night: "Trevor always wanted to make people happy and we weren't surprised when we heard what he was doing on the mountain."
Mr Walls's wife Lindsey and Peter, his 15-year-old son, are due to visit the spot where he died later today. "He was a great dad and just adored Peter," added Mrs Walls.
A CLIMBER died in Glencoe while trying to climb to the top of Buachaille Etive Mhor to leave a surprise bottle of champagne for a friend.
Trevor Walls, 51, editor of The Glaswegian weekly newspaper, slipped and fell while climbing on Friday.
His body was found in East Gully by members of Glencoe mountain rescue team, who found the bottle smashed inside Mr Walls's rucksack.
Last night his mother Jean, 71, said Mr Walls had wanted to leave a bottle of champagne at the summit in celebration of the 50th birthday of a friend, who had been due to climb the mountain later that day.
He had played a leading role in the Daily Record mountain club and members continued with their weekend plans to climb the mountain where he died in his honour.
A club spokesman said: "It was a very emotional day, but we felt it was the right thing to do, and it is what Trevor would have wanted."
http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/19827.html
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